Rob Hatch

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Because those city's names, due to their long-standing history and importance, are more normal vocabulary than proper names.
Also, I'm pretty sure both of those names are older than the current modern language pronunciation/name. Paris, pronounced the "english" way was the original pronunciation, it came from the Parisii tribe. I wouldn't be surprised if the same goes for Milan and it became Milano later.
 
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May 9, 2021
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Also, I'm pretty sure both of those names are older than the current modern language pronunciation/name. Paris, pronounced the "english" way was the original pronunciation, it came from the Parisii tribe. I wouldn't be surprised if the same goes for Milan and it became Milano later.
But not Paree-Nice?
 
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I'm watching this stage in French, in fact, and Jacky Durand just referred to "Ooh Kartie."

obviously H is difficult for French speakers, of course.
My uncle once brought his car to a French garage. The mechanic knew that the letter "h" isn't silent in English, so he asked my uncle if he wanted him to change the hoil. He definitely made an effort, although he didn't get it completely right.
 
Yes, and the race was established when modern French was the dominant language in France, so the pronunciation is fine. The city was known be the "English" pronunciation since the Romans and, unsurprisingly, that's the pronunciation that has survived in English.
I also wonder if some of it could be because of "flow". "Paris-Nice" just sounds a little... chunky... if you have to strongly pronounce the 's' in 'Paris'. Same with names; for me pronuncing the surname of the French 'Martin' in, well, the French way just comes naturally, because it comes after the very French name 'Guillaume', and please, OP, don't tell me you want commentators to somehow anglify 'Guillaume'.
 
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I also wonder if some of it could be because of "flow". "Paris-Nice" just sounds a little... chunky... if you have to strongly pronounce the 's' in 'Paris'. Same with names; for me pronuncing the surname of the French 'Martin' in, well, the French way just comes naturally, because it comes after the very French name 'Guillaume', and please, OP, don't tell me you want commentators to somehow anglify 'Guillaume'.
honestly, I don't know why. It could be Rob learnt the name of the race pronounced that way, but the city pronounced the other way. He might have started pronouncing it differently and that changed. I don't really care, I'm really just pointing out why saying Paris the English way when referring specifically to the city, and saying it the French way when referring to races, fits historically with the development of the different languages, the city and the races.


Gwilliam...
 
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I also wonder if some of it could be because of "flow". "Paris-Nice" just sounds a little... chunky... if you have to strongly pronounce the 's' in 'Paris'. Same with names; for me pronuncing the surname of the French 'Martin' in, well, the French way just comes naturally, because it comes after the very French name 'Guillaume', and please, OP, don't tell me you want commentators to somehow anglify 'Guillaume'.
Bill Martin?
We might as well spare some syllables while we're at it.
 
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I think literally every Eurosport commentator has pronounced Paris-Nice with the silent S, except Sean Kelly.

The talk earlier of going with dialectal pronunciations may be excessive, but I see nothing wrong with trying to pronounce a name as it would be in at least the standard phonology of the rider's native tongue, although I know that even that can cause some variation, such as use of the dental fricative for z and ci/ce in Spanish. You might not need to go as far as pronouncing a name in Züritüütsch or broad Boarisch, but you could at least enunciate the name in standard German. Sure, if you don't have a particular sound in your phonology then you might need to find some kind of substitute or approximation if you can't enunciate that sound comfortably or struggle to differentiate it, but that's all, really.
 
Oct 15, 2020
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So why was the finish in Milan not in Milano, why does the last day of the Tour de France come 'the run in to Paris' not Paree?
I'm not sure if you're just being deliberately obtuse here - but those places have English exonyms that have been taken into common parlance and Fribourg hasn't. To be even more specific, Milan is the name for Milano in Lombard language so our name for it probably stems from that; and the silent 's' in French (as in Paris) was only developed in the middle ages so perhaps the pronunciation is derived from the old French style that or just from seeing it written rather than spoken.

Exonyms are probably more common in other European languages as border areas and hinterlands see lots of crossover in language - it would be normal for an Italian to call Zürich 'Zurigo', a German to call Geneva 'Gänf/Genf' or a French person to call Basel 'Bâle'. Here's a wikipedia page with all English exonyms which you can see all of the place names if you're still confused with anything else https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_exonyms
 
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Oct 15, 2020
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Apparently Rob Hatch's normal voice is tinged with a strong Scottish accent which you would never know listening to his commentary - Think Hatch is talented at linguistics.
I just googled as his voice is hard to place accent wise to find out where he was from (Blackburn FWIW), and found this quote in an interview which elicited a chuckle

Cyc: What’s the thing you’re criticised for the most?

RH: Brexiters are the ones who give me crap on Twitter, about saying people’s names with the correct foreign pronunciation. Which is bizarre! I’m not saying everybody has to say the names like I do. You say it how you want – I couldn’t care less! Call him Ni-ba-li, Niba-li, whatever you want to, but why should I say it wrong?
From here: https://www.cyclist.co.uk/in-depth/7487/the-biggest-problem-in-our-business-is-ego-rob-hatch-qa
 
Actually there are some talking points here which are intermingling.

I don't want to dwell on the Anglo-Saxons, as some of them are really nice people :shortcake:, but from my experience it's really common for them to anglify foreigner's first names especially - Luciana becomes Lucy, Matthias Matt. I haven't experienced this in other languages as much, although sometimes Chinese or Thai for instance in Germany change their name themselves so that they won't feel like an outsider so much and their name doesn't constantly get butchered. It's actually sad, I'd rather make the effort to pronounce them (half-)correctly.

Isn't part of the discussion here actually the difference between how a word is written and how it's spoken, and whether you should follow the written letters or the sound of a name?

I would never say Milano in German. It's Mailand, because, yes, Milano sounds totally artificial if used in a German conversation. Same with Paris or London.

But I think there's a huge difference between using the common pronounciation in your country for a big, known city, and germanizing/anglifying, whatever, a town which has no such standard pronounciation.
Same goes for proper names, actually. Cäsar is Cäsar in German, Cesar in English. I wouldn't use Kai-ssar in a conversation.

To me it's less important to not change a city's name, I'm okay with it getting home-sized, but when it comes to people I'm actually annoyed because that feels disrespectful to me, like you are not respecting who that person is.

Which name you use for a city can be extremely political, sometimes I don't even know about it, but who has used the name before is quite important - not so much when it's about whether Fribourg should be pronounced French or English (personally I never know whether to pronounce it German or French when I'm in a German conversation), but for instance Stalingrad-Wolgograd, or cities in Eastern Europe which often have German names as well, but if you use them it's indicating a bit these cities should belong to Germany...

I would never have thought this question could be one of modern English politics, though, I'm quite surprised!
 
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I would never have thought this question could be one of modern English politics, though, I'm quite surprised!
Never underestimate the outright stupidity of English politics when it comes to language, we get articles in our right wing press about whether having road signs in English and Welsh in Wales causes English drivers to crash because they are confused by the Welsh language.
 

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