• The Cycling News forum is looking to add some volunteer moderators with Red Rick's recent retirement. If you're interested in helping keep our discussions on track, send a direct message to @SHaines here on the forum, or use the Contact Us form to message the Community Team.

    In the meanwhile, please use the Report option if you see a post that doesn't fit within the forum rules.

    Thanks!

Scott Mercier

hi everyone, long time lurker first time poster here.

Firstly want to thank you guys here who contribute to the forum here and have taught me alot about doping in cycling(even if i do think some of you are crazy ;) )

Anyway found an interesting article about bbc on a cyclist called scott mercier who i'd never heard of. Haven't heard anyone else mention him but you can really feel his frustration at how unfair and ridiculous the whole situation was back then and obviously he wasn't the only one who went through this. but like he said, he made the right decision and he doesn't now have to tell his kids now how he's a liar and a cheat.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/cycling/19930514
 
Jul 10, 2012
200
0
0
Visit site
After recently reading about Mercier in Tyler's book, I must say that he is one of my new heroes. Everyone should know the guy's name and what he did.

Cycling will clean up its act once it has more Merciers in the sport and fewer of the likes of Vaughters or Zabriskie or Leipheimer.
 
May 26, 2010
28,143
5
0
Visit site
babastooey said:
After recently reading about Mercier in Tyler's book, I must say that he is one of my new heroes. Everyone should know the guy's name and what he did.

Cycling will clean up its act once it has more Merciers in the sport and fewer of the likes of Vaughters or Zabriskie or Leipheimer.

I would prefer fewer Armstrongs, Bruyneels, Verbruggens, mcQuaids and Ferarris.
 
Jul 10, 2012
200
0
0
Visit site
Benotti69 said:
I would prefer fewer Armstrongs, Bruyneels, Verbruggens, mcQuaids and Ferarris.

Perhaps it is a chicken and egg scenario. Reading Tyler's book actually made me feel sympathy for the riders who had to choose between quitting on their dreams or taking drugs. It was the owners and the directors who pressured them to win, the doctors who provided, and the administrators (UCI) who turned a blind eye. However, when it all boils down, it was the riders who decided to do it. If it is our desire to have a clean sport, then the sport needs more riders principled enough not to do anything wrong in the first place; if 100% of the riders in the pro peloton were like Mercier then there simply wouldn't be any doping in the sport. Therefore, if the goal is a 100% clean sport, we should celebrate the Merciers, even above the remorseful ex-cheaters. Especially the remorseful ex-cheaters, who are as dirty as the unrepentant cheaters but do anything possible to survive, have their cake, and eat it too.
 
May 19, 2011
4,857
2
0
Visit site
motty89 said:
hi everyone, long time lurker first time poster here.

Firstly want to thank you guys here who contribute to the forum here and have taught me alot about doping in cycling(even if i do think some of you are crazy ;) )

Anyway found an interesting article about bbc on a cyclist called scott mercier who i'd never heard of. Haven't heard anyone else mention him but you can really feel his frustration at how unfair and ridiculous the whole situation was back then and obviously he wasn't the only one who went through this. but like he said, he made the right decision and he doesn't now have to tell his kids now how he's a liar and a cheat.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/cycling/19930514

http://velonews.competitor.com/2011...rider-says-hamiltons-charges-ring-true_174876
 
Actually, I was surprised by Mercier's account of his decision to quit the sport due to his not being ready to dope.

It sounded as if he almost regretted it... as if he genuinely didn't believe what he did was more commendable than what riders who doped did.
 
Sep 24, 2012
46
0
0
Visit site
In Mercier's CN article he also applies the business analogy to the UCI's role in oversight (like I did in a post here :). ie, if UCI and McQuaid were the board and CEO of a listed company, the shareholders and/or corporations law would have eaten them up long ago.
 
Sep 24, 2012
46
0
0
Visit site
bribery, corruption, non-disclosure, complicity, criminal activity rife within the "supply chain", failed oversight - they wouldn't have a hope in hell.
Maybe there's a good reason the UCI is based in Switzerland...
Perhaps the UCI should become a listed company in Aus, US or UK, where it has to report transparently to regulators, and where we can all buy shares and show up to the annual meeting and vote out any dodos who aren't doing their job properly.
 
May 26, 2010
28,143
5
0
Visit site
Surfdelux said:
bribery, corruption, non-disclosure, complicity, criminal activity rife within the "supply chain", failed oversight - they wouldn't have a hope in hell.
Maybe there's a good reason the UCI is based in Switzerland...
Perhaps the UCI should become a listed company in Aus, US or UK, where it has to report transparently to regulators, and where we can all buy shares and show up to the annual meeting and vote out any dodos who aren't doing their job properly.

All the sporting world federations should be dragged out of SwissTaxHavenLand into te real world where real laws apply.

IOC, FIFA, UEFA, etc etc.
 

TRENDING THREADS