Serena Williams Temper Tantrum

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Apr 20, 2009
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Alpe d'Huez said:
Can't believe some people here are almost acting like what she did was justified, because it was a relatively obscure call. Unreal.
Perhaps she was more justified making a mistake in the heat of the moment and losing her temper than ad hominem attacks behind the safety and anonymity of the internet. You stay classy.

Alpe d'Huez said:
Oh, and her body looks like a man with boobs.
RDV4ROUBAIX said:
...her man feet...
roid rage
 
Jun 2, 2009
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dirtybill said:
the linesman should recognize her place and let the athletes compete even if you do not find her physically attractive.
Recognize her place as an official? An official whose job is to identify infractions and make the call, regardless of degree of severity? That place or the place where they don't actually have a job or duty and let the athletes play through. Why have officials at all then?
I believe the official was watching over Serena with extra scrutiny due to - whatever - but the reaction was not becoming of a professional.
 
Apr 20, 2009
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Max Cadence said:
Recognize her place as an official? An official whose job is to identify infractions and make the call, regardless of degree of severity? That place or the place where they don't actually have a job or duty and let the athletes play through. Why have officials at all then?
I believe the official was watching over Serena with extra scrutiny due to - whatever - but the reaction was not becoming of a professional.
While I agree with both of your opinions that the official was just doing her job the way she should and Serena's "reaction was not becoming of a professional", John McEnroe on this said, "In my opinion, you can't call a foot fault there. Just out of the question. Can't do it. It was so close. Not as if it was an obvious foot fault-it was minuscule." FWIW
 
Generally a foot fault would only be called if the server is constantly taking advantage and getting too big a jump on the way to the net. It is one of those calls that is made to send a message and to keep the player within bounds. To make a call like that with potentially 2 points left in the match is bordering on disrespecting the player. I think that is why Williams reacted like she did. Was she right? He!l no. But it's not the most off the wall response I've seen on a tennis court. That same McEnroe guy once called the umpire at Wimbledon the "pits of the world" among other things.
 
Jul 8, 2009
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Hugh Januss said:
I played tounament tennis when I was young. Serena went crazy it's true. But calling a footfault at that point in a match is like if they would have disqualified Cunego for not riding a straight line in the last 200 meters.
I disagree. A foot fault is a foot fault, regardless of when it happens during the match.
 
Jul 23, 2009
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dirtybill said:
the linesman should recognize her place and let the athletes compete even if you do not find her physically attractive.
Nothing unattractive about that woman in my humble opinion.
 
gregod said:
John McEnroe on this said, "In my opinion, you can't call a foot fault there. Just out of the question. Can't do it. It was so close. Not as if it was an obvious foot fault-it was minuscule."
Ahhh yes, John McEnroe, whose methods were to insult and humiliate any official who didn't give him the calls he wanted in a very loud and vocal manner.

If what he says is true about not calling it, then they need to change the rules.

Still can't fathom why people think this call justifies Serena's profane laced threats to this official. Next time a police officer pulls you over for not signaling when there are no cars around, or blowing through stop signs on your bike, try telling him it's a stupid call, use the f word a lot, and threaten him physically. Do the same thing to the judge when you get to court. Then come back here and tell us how it went.

And physical attraction has little to do with it. Serena does have a body like a man. She is very muscular, with huge thighs, and a very defined physique.

Meanwhile, Roger Federer channeled McEnroe himself when he was getting his a** whipped today as well. Though at least he held his composure at the end and didn't threaten anyone.
 
Apr 20, 2009
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Alpe d'Huez said:
Still can't fathom why people think this call justifies Serena's profane laced threats to this official. Next time a police officer pulls you over for not signaling when there are no cars around, or blowing through stop signs on your bike, try telling him it's a stupid call, use the f word a lot, and threaten him physically. Do the same thing to the judge when you get to court. Then come back here and tell us how it went.
I, for one, never said her behavior was justified; just that her appearance has nothing to do with this. Furthermore, your analogy doesn't quite hold up. If the cop had been watching and letting people blow a stop sign (like the tennis officials who tend to ease up on technical faults near the end of matches) and suddenly John Law decides to ticket you, you would have a case for being angry. In fact, I got out of a minor speeding ticket with the very same argument many years ago. Of course, I didn't berate anybody. I calmly accepted the ticket, appeared in court, contested it and won.

Somebody alluded to the George Brett/pine tar incident earlier. Umpires had been letting that go for years, then after he gets a hit (a homerun?) and the other team's manager protests and the rest... you can imagine. Also, from baseball: When umpires stopped the "phantom second base tag" during double plays, they didn't just suddenly start enforcing the rule. They told all of the teams during the winter meetings that it would be enforced the following season. So, just because something is a rule, if it is not enforced or called only under certain circumstances, if the players have a certain expectation and that is arbitrarily changed by the official, while technically correct, is still unfair.

Alpe d'Huez said:
And physical attraction has little to do with it. Serena does have a body like a man. She is very muscular, with huge thighs, and a very defined physique.
I don't know what your looking at, but I see a very curvy woman. She's got big boobs and backside. 100% woman IMO.
 
You're analogy doesn't hold up as I see it. It's making the assumption that people have been making foot faults all tournament long, and it wasn't until then that the official called it. But there's not proof of that. And because CBS didn't have a camera on it, we'll never know just how much she faulted. But a fault is a fault is a fault.

She was still in the match at that point, but instead of keeping her composure and channeling her focus, she instead decided to launch into her profane laced tirade at the official.

Fine example she set.

You say curvy, I say manly.





She probably weighed 20lbs less a few years ago if one digs those photos up as well.
 
Apr 20, 2009
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Alpe d'Huez said:
It's making the assumption that people have been making foot faults all tournament long...
I am doing no such thing. As I said previously, toward the end of any big match officials tend to let slight foot faults slide so as not to affect the outcome of the match based on something that has no competitive advantage. The match commentary and sports reports from the newspaper, as well as my own experience from watching my brother when he played back this up. Even Kim Clijsters during the post-game presser said that it was an unusual call. Almost everybody who knows anything about tennis agrees Serena was right to be angry, but her tirade was NOT justified. She earned her $10,000 fine and effective disqualification and that should be the end of it.
 
Aug 3, 2009
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Are women tennis pros tested?Appears to be some serious drugging going on there.Yuccckkkk.They probably have to shave every morning.
 
Apr 20, 2009
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broken chain said:
Are women tennis pros tested?Appears to be some serious drugging going on there.Yuccckkkk.They probably have to shave every morning.
...their balls:D
 
Perhaps what surprises me most is that this entire topic was started on Venus deplorable behavior. And yet, some people, not only here but elsewhere, have turned the conversation to the foot fault, like that's what is the key issue here.

To me, the conversation wasn't about the foot fault. As I said, she was still in the match at that point. The conversation, and why I started this thread, had to do with her outburst, which is one of the worst I have seen in recent years in any sport.

Great first shot there BroDeal. What a perfectly cute little tush Hingis had:



-----------------------------------------

Very pretty as well (note lack of powerlifter muscles):



------------------------------------------

And adventurous too!



Not that she wasn't without her temper, though it was mostly directed at herself.
 
Mar 10, 2009
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What many people are forgetting when they see these 'abnormal' images of tennis women (or men), is that almost all these shots are taken right at or just after the point of impact.

That means that the arms are in a full swing forwards, muscles are contracted, and due to the motion and impact, the skin 'disappears' or lags behind, revealing the underlying muscle tissue. Some clever photoshoppers could even enhance these features, to make them look like freaks.

I beleive that most of these muscles can be grown just by working out in a gym, and without the use of PEDs. The increase in popularity of power tennis, fueled partly by different/better rackets, could thus mean that they have to work their arms a lot harder in order to remain competitive.
 
Apr 20, 2009
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Alpe d'Huez said:
Perhaps what surprises me most is that this entire topic was started on
--->Serena's deplorable behavior. ...
Serena is neither the first nor the last athlete to have a tantrum and you are right that her behavior was deplorable (and she was punished), but aren't athletes entitled to get angry once in a while without the over-the-top attention? As someone once said, "there is no such thing as bad publicity." It seems to me that by focusing so much attention on this, it is more of an example of what-to-do than what-not-to-do in the current media obsessed culture.

Also, my main objection to your first post was the name calling, not the calling out of Ms. Williams' behavior.

PS Why doesn't work?
 
Apr 21, 2009
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Hotheads

Alpe d'Huez said:
Can't believe some people here are almost acting like what she did was justified, because it was a relatively obscure call. Unreal.

So the linesman should have just let it pass? What if TV cameras caught it, and it was an obvious fault - the officials ignored it, then Serena goes on to win the match? Would that have been okay?
I agree with you on this one. Seems like sportsmanship is no longer valued, anywhere. I have never liked hotheads, whether it's John McEnroe, Robbie McEwen, or anybody else. Athletes are held up as examples to be admired and emulated but bad behavior seems to be pretty consistently tolerated in our society. Even a bad call (which the athlete or fan is not in a position to judge) does not EVER justify an athlete's abuse of an official.

I think the officials must make their best calls at the time and should not be questioned (except where there are procedures established, like video review or consulting with another official). I played and refereed in Rugby for many years, and talking back to the referee was NOT tolerated. And referees were not allowed to change a call, except in a couple of specific situations.
 
Apr 20, 2009
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Rupert said:
I agree with you on this one. Seems like sportsmanship is no longer valued, anywhere. I have never liked hotheads, whether it's John McEnroe, Robbie McEwen, or anybody else. Athletes are held up as examples to be admired and emulated but bad behavior seems to be pretty consistently tolerated in our society. Even a bad call (which the athlete or fan is not in a position to judge) does not EVER justify an athlete's abuse of an official.

I think the officials must make their best calls at the time and should not be questioned (except where there are procedures established, like video review or consulting with another official). I played and refereed in Rugby for many years, and talking back to the referee was NOT tolerated. And referees were not allowed to change a call, except in a couple of specific situations.
I am not sure I agree with you that sportsmanship is no longer valued; just look at all of the outcry over Serena's behavior. She was fined, as well. My original complaint was over the ad hominem nature of the criticism of her. My subsequent defense of her, although unstated, was based on my own experience of my own temper during sporting events. I find it hard to criticize others for things I have done, too.
 
Rupert said:
I agree with you on this one. Seems like sportsmanship is no longer valued, anywhere.
It's part of the culture it seems. Winning means more than anything. Take a look at advertisers like Nike. Or just look at Wall Street. Me first, no matter how much I already have, and how many people I impoverish in the process.

gregod said:
My subsequent defense of her, although unstated, was based on my own experience of my own temper during sporting events. I find it hard to criticize others for things I have done, too.
That explains it to me.

I don't understand why someone should be excused, and those who follow the rules, and respect officials, having to deal with it. There is no room for screaming profanities and making threats as I see it, no matter what the sport, or place in society.

By the way. A page or so ago you accused me of hiding behind a computer. If you spend a little time here you'll find I do anything but. It isn't hard at all to find out my name, who I am, where I live, where I work. And I have said in other posts, anyone can PM me for any such information. I have nothing to hide.
 
Apr 20, 2009
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Alpe d'Huez said:
...
I don't understand why someone should be excused, and those who follow the rules, and respect officials, having to deal with it. There is no room for screaming profanities and making threats as I see it, no matter what the sport, or place in society.

By the way. A page or so ago you accused me of hiding behind a computer. If you spend a little time here you'll find I do anything but. It isn't hard at all to find out my name, who I am, where I live, where I work. And I have said in other posts, anyone can PM me for any such information. I have nothing to hide.
either way, just as it is bad form to "scream profanities and mak[e] threats", name calling hardly elevates the discourse.

by the way, never said she should be excused. she was rightly penalized money and the match.

cheers.
 
Apr 21, 2009
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Outcry

gregod said:
I am not sure I agree with you that sportsmanship is no longer valued; just look at all of the outcry over Serena's behavior. .... I find it hard to criticize others for things I have done, too.
Some, but there's also a lot of questioning of the referee's call (in some of the media), and a lot of excuses made for her (Williams') behavior. I think much of the population seems accept such behavior as part of (any) game. I think it degrades what is supposed to be one of the positive aspects of sports (sportsmanship). At least in the US, it starts with little league Dads yelling at the umpire and continues all the way through profesional sports. I don't think it should be tolerated at any level.

Not that I've never lost my head in a sporting setting, but when I did I was /or should have been penalised immediately. Once an official establishes that they're not going to take any crap, the players generally settle down and just play, as they should. I learned that refereeing college rugby, which can be a pretty challenging environment. And we should expect a pretty high level of professionalism from professionals.
 

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