Sinkewitz, positive for rHGH

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sniper said:
That search tip is interesting indeed. Gave me this:
http://gototennis.com/2010/09/25/rafael-nadal-knee-update-his-doctors-spin-on-prp-therapy/

Dr. Anthony Galea, the prominent sports-medicine specialist who administered PRP injections to Tiger Woods and many other professional athletes, was arrested late last year in Toronto for attempting to smuggle Human Growth Hormone across the U.S./Canadian border. According to the New York Times, he was also “suspected of providing athletes with performance-enhancing drugs.”
:eek:

Say it isn't so!

Dave.
 
Dec 30, 2010
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Prp

By the way, PRP is an approved treatment for tendonitis. Growth hormones are injected directly into the tendon, and if administered in the approved way, has no performance enhancing effect.

Problem is, studies have shown PRP is mostly in-effective at curing tendonitis. Many of the cynics (myself included) believe that the PRP treatment is used as a ruse to administer growth hormones for performance enhancement.
 
Jun 5, 2010
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JPM London said:
Or maybe it's even as simple as the doctor in the article said - when they believe the drug can't be detected it's easy to become careless...
Is it also possible that the systematic across-the-team doping described by Landis (the real eye-opener for me in his testimony, i have to admit) has become too expensive for routine use. Note that i didn't say risky - i said expensive. Budgets are being cut because of the commercial unattractiveness of the sport & one has to assume that these drug programmes are expensive; so instead of team doctors supervising a proper plan, riders are having to do it for themselves - & as others have pointed out previously, most riders aren't exactly rocket scientists

One of the oddities of PN & TA this year (& Oman & Qatar before that) is that the power domestiques seem less powerful. Breakaways have been staying away; & when the bunch does sprint, there seem to be less people in the bunch

With regards
Robert
 
ksmith said:
Tony Martin, Andreas Kloden 1st & 2nd in the Paris-Nice, a nice one -two for Germany. Things are looking up for German cyclng fans then good old Sinkewitz pops a positive. Just what German cycling needed and cycling in general

I really couldn't give a rats ar... if he was targeted. If he was, they were correct (subject to B-test). If they got him through the Bio- Passport great.
All that matters is they got him.

Kick him out of cycling for life in all aspects, enough is enough.
I, for one am tired of hearing it was a mistake. Blah Blah bloody Blah.
I'm going to leave Tony Martin out of this, but frankly I still hold the belief that Patrik Sinkewitz has done more for the fight against doping than Andreas Klöden ever will.

Sinkewitz is also, going by past form, not the kind of guy to be all "it was a mistake, blah blah". Last time around he was all "yup, I did it, I did this, I did that and this is how I evaded the testers". If he's guilty, I expect him to come quietly.
 
Jul 6, 2010
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Libertine Seguros said:
I'm going to leave Tony Martin out of this, but frankly I still hold the belief that Patrik Sinkewitz has done more for the fight against doping than Andreas Klöden ever will.

Sinkewitz is also, going by past form, not the kind of guy to be all "it was a mistake, blah blah". Last time around he was all "yup, I did it, I did this, I did that and this is how I evaded the testers". If he's guilty, I expect him to come quietly.
HE may go quietly into that dying of the light, but should we (or anyone) allow him?

Isn't this a perfect example of what many have railed against? The repeat offender, the archetypical 'professional cyclist'? As much as I've loved his contribution to some wicked-*ssed racing, his time has obviously come.

As I've said before, the penalty should not rest solely on HIS shoulders. If the UCI has any sort of b*lls they'll stick their guns (as they so recently expounded at the team meeting) and look into spanking the team.

I realize they wouldn't be able to hit them this season, but after this disclosure it sure makes for some good talking points and allows them to present a team for an example.

Someone's got to pick a 'zero point' to work from, and since it's not going to be this season, they might as well start ramping it up for next with a pretty goat to beat upon...
 
I meant quietly as in without any protest against those who would be banning him - like he did first time.

Given that he has nothing left to lose, and he was pretty open back when he was caught the first time around, we could learn a lot from Patrik Sinkewitz if he talks. And he could well talk.

On the other hand, because co-operation meant a faster return last time, whereas this time the ban is likely to be life, co-operation or no co-operation, he may try the Contador tack. I don't expect the German federation to be so easy-going though.
 
Libertine Seguros said:
I meant quietly as in without any protest against those who would be banning him - like he did first time.

Given that he has nothing left to lose, and he was pretty open back when he was caught the first time around, we could learn a lot from Patrik Sinkewitz if he talks. And he could well talk.

On the other hand, because co-operation meant a faster return last time, whereas this time the ban is likely to be life, co-operation or no co-operation, he may try the Contador tack. I don't expect the German federation to be so easy-going though.
If he wants to ride again he needs to go with the complete denial route this time around.
 
Libertine Seguros said:
I meant quietly as in without any protest against those who would be banning him - like he did first time.

Given that he has nothing left to lose, and he was pretty open back when he was caught the first time around, we could learn a lot from Patrik Sinkewitz if he talks. And he could well talk.

On the other hand, because co-operation meant a faster return last time, whereas this time the ban is likely to be life, co-operation or no co-operation, he may try the Contador tack. I don't expect the German federation to be so easy-going though.
I don't think he could afford the Contador tack.
 
Jul 6, 2010
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Libertine Seguros said:
I meant quietly as in without any protest against those who would be banning him - like he did first time.

Given that he has nothing left to lose, and he was pretty open back when he was caught the first time around, we could learn a lot from Patrik Sinkewitz if he talks. And he could well talk.

On the other hand, because co-operation meant a faster return last time, whereas this time the ban is likely to be life, co-operation or no co-operation, he may try the Contador tack. I don't expect the German federation to be so easy-going though.
Agreed.

His primary disclosure may have been one to 'save his *ss' (or his conscience). If he feels he's done enough and achieved enough, he may start spilling.

These are the guys I'm waiting on to turn the tide. Totally solid riders who have paid their dues, getting sold by UCI testing. It's going to be a rare day when the primaries get their due. That may sound obtuse with what's going on with AC and LA, but you've gotta look at what's actually getting done.

Fear the Germans. That's a tough media gauntlet to run through...
 
Well, I hope he talks. We'll see.

It's sad though, it just shows that even people that confess can't really be trusted or let back into the sport. Or the few that do confess are going to get blindsided by those like Patrick who will take advantage of any good will.

A friend who talked to him more than once told me he was pretty dense. Still, I don't feel much sympathy for the guy to be honest. He must sleep in any bed he makes at this point.
 
Sep 16, 2009
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95% of the peloton is on the juice. If you were unlucky to be caught the first time, you have a decision to make. Stay on the juice and remain competitive or don't take it and be out the back every race? Easy choice to make if you are in the position.

This shouldnt' be a surprise to anyone. You can't learn from your mistakes because you have to use to be competitive and keep your job.
 
Sasquatch said:
95% of the peloton is on the juice. If you were unlucky to be caught the first time, you have a decision to make. Stay on the juice and remain competitive or don't take it and be out the back every race? Easy choice to make if you are in the position.

This shouldnt' be a surprise to anyone. You can't learn from your mistakes because you have to use to be competitive and keep your job.
This coincides with my parallel world theory.

Dope, get caught, confess (or not), claim you have learned your lesson, serve your time - then slip right back into that parallel world that is pro cycling where doping is a normal daily occurrence. "Clean" in the outside world even when on the full program in the parallel world.

As Sasquatch says, difficult to quit the parallel world as long as a majority of the competition are living there.
 
Alpe d'Huez said:
Well, I hope he talks. We'll see.

It's sad though, it just shows that even people that confess can't really be trusted or let back into the sport. Or the few that do confess are going to get blindsided by those like Patrick who will take advantage of any good will.

A friend who talked to him more than once told me he was pretty dense. Still, I don't feel much sympathy for the guy to be honest. He must sleep in any bed he makes at this point.
He may not be the smartest, but from meeting him I found him to be a nice guy. So was Isidro Nozal, and he popped twice (2005 50% test and 2009 Volta a Portugal). So, by all accounts that I've read, is Tyler Hamilton.

Still, if you've shown you can be tempted once (and let's face it, Patrik was hardly a non-complicit guy who was 'tempted once' before his 2007 positive, even in his own words) then you're always susceptible to being tempted again. Especially when you're trying to rebuild a career, and spend nearly half a season without a team; compared to many dopers Patrik was ostracized but not fully blacklisted à la Rasmussen. He said a few months ago that this was the first time in years that he's been able to prepare properly for a season, knowing who he's riding for and where he'll be riding. Now we know what preparing properly for a season means in Patrik Sinkewitz' world.

This does raise questions about those who confess and get the lesser bans though. Riccò got his ban reduced by about 4 months because he named some already well-known names and was thought of as being dishonest, had to fight to get those months knocked off - but he still got them and look where he is. Sinkewitz got a one year ban for his honesty and coöperation, talked about a lot of things for the first time and look where he is.

I'm just waiting for Emanuele Sella to go ballistic in the mountains of the Giro again. Savio said he was a guy who could have stayed clean but was naïve and easily led, and surrounded by bad people. Savio should know - he's presided over many a doping positive.

Oh, as an aside: "-witz" is a German rendering of a Slavic root (like "Szmyd" is a Polish rendering of the German "Schmidt"). There is also a German noun "Witz". It means "joke".
 
Lets hope this is the first of more hGH positives.

Libertine Seguros said:
I'm just waiting for Emanuele Sella to go ballistic in the mountains of the Giro again. Savio said he was a guy who could have stayed clean but was naïve and easily led, and surrounded by bad people. Savio should know - he's presided over many a doping positive.
Haha, hope not. Watched that Giro the other day, looked so obvious/crazy in retrospect.
 
Sep 9, 2009
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on3m@n@rmy said:
Das ist schade.
Does Sinkewitz have a rider nickname?
So-Cals Stinkypits might do..
or Sinking-Wits
"Stinky pits" is what Christian Vandevelde publicly called him, after Sinkewitz was ejected from the 2007 Tour. He also wished violence on the guy.

You will note that this is the same Vandevelde who didn't utter a peep when his former team leader at the Fuentes-fueled Liberty Seguros team, Roberto Heras, was popped for EPO in 2005. VDV was also characteristically silent when his team leader at the Fuentes-fueled CSC team, Ivan Basso, was popped in 2006. And golly gee, never said a word about David Millar, either. Nor about the Landis allegations.

Easy pickins is easy pickins, eh Christian?
 
filipo said:
"Stinky pits" is what Christian Vandevelde publicly called him, after Sinkewitz was ejected from the 2007 Tour. He also wished violence on the guy.

You will note that this is the same Vandevelde who didn't utter a peep when his former team leader at the Fuentes-fueled Liberty Seguros team, Roberto Heras, was popped for EPO in 2005. VDV was also characteristically silent when his team leader at the Fuentes-fueled CSC team, Ivan Basso, was popped in 2006. And golly gee, never said a word about David Millar, either. Nor about the Landis allegations.

Easy pickins is easy pickins, eh Christian?
Can we still hold out hope for saying something about LA?

Dave.
 
Ferrari!

Sinkewitz is probably going to keep his mouth shut and take his medicine, like he did before. If he didn't snitch on Ferrari then, it's not likely he'll snitch on him now.
 
Mar 4, 2010
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Andynonomous said:
By the way, PRP is an approved treatment for tendonitis. Growth hormones are injected directly into the tendon, and if administered in the approved way, has no performance enhancing effect.

Problem is, studies have shown PRP is mostly in-effective at curing tendonitis. Many of the cynics (myself included) believe that the PRP treatment is used as a ruse to administer growth hormones for performance enhancement.
Huh? :confused:
 
Mar 13, 2009
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webvan said:
8 to 24 hours detection window apparently, not a lot to worry about then...
Andynonomous said:
growth hormone works slowly
So does this mean it is detectable 24 hours max, but only actually starts working later than that? If so, it really does make a tempting doping-choice, especially for 1-day races

ksmith said:
Tony Martin, Andreas Kloden 1st & 2nd in the Paris-Nice, a nice one -two for Germany. Things are looking up for German cyclng fans then good old Sinkewitz pops a positive. Just what German cycling needed
+1. Martin had already won Algarve, Degenkolb is looking strong, Klemme has taken his first victory, Greipel will probably have a good season ... I was really hoping this would be the beginning of the turnaround for German cycling, but this comes now as a major setback.

I must also admit I was pro-Sinkewitz when he came back, believed he was clean ... I guess there was a good reason that he had such a hard time finding a team
 
Dec 30, 2010
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Tyler'sTwin said:
Growth hormones can be administered in a way that doesn't enhance performance (directly into an injured tendon), or it can be administered in a way that does enhance performance.

The PRP treatment is directly into the tendon. If an athlete fakes an injury to their tendon, then schedules a PRP treatment that is actually a PED treatment using growth hormones, it will "explain away" a doctors visit that was for performance enhancement. It also protects the physician (why he has growth hormones in his clinic).
 
Dec 30, 2010
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Christian said:
So does this mean it is detectable 24 hours max, but only actually starts working later than that? If so, it really does make a tempting doping-choice, especially for 1-day races

The performance enhancing effects are long term (usually used in conjunction with a faster acting substance). The window for testing positive is very short term (less than 3 days, with some types clearing the system in less than 1 day). Although it "clears the system" quickly, it's Performance enhancing effects lasts weeks, or months.

Used by itself during competition, it will have limited, or no effect, so no, I don't believe that it will help in 1 day races (unless it is used with a "booster" just before competition).
 

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