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Team Kits? Your Views.......

Page 5 - Get up to date with the latest news, scores & standings from the Cycling News Community.
Nov 3, 2009
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I don't wear pro kit because 1) its expensive and 2) I'd rather promote my club's sponsors and our local shop than a Kasakh airline.

Now, if you're going to don a Festina or Saunier Duval jersey? That's just funny.
 
Jun 24, 2009
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excelerator said:
I don't wear pro kit because 1) its expensive and 2) I'd rather promote my club's sponsors and our local shop than a Kasakh airline.

Now, if you're going to don a Festina or Saunier Duval jersey? That's just funny.

:pI just love people with such an Explosive sense of Humor!:D:D
 
Oct 29, 2009
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Recreational cyclists seem to be anything but going by their hang-ups. As a social group, we seem to have a lot in common with other groups like so-called 'outlaw' motorbike gangs when it comes to displaying our 'colours' even when we have no such affiliations.

Take, for example, the rainbow jersey. To say one has to earn the right to wear a white jersey with five colours on it seems to imply we belong to an association where these colours mean something in particular, like a high rank in some type of military or hierachical context. To say that somebody doesn't deserve to wear these colours is to say that somebody belongs to a corporate entity of some type, even if that person doesn't identify with this entity.

In short, why does riding a bicycle mean you belong to a hierachical group? I, for one, used to race many years ago and now ride for the fresh air, the birdsong, the fitness, the peace and the sheer joy of expanding my lungs. This crap about earning such and such a right smacks of elitism, conservatism and puritanism (which is three too many isms for anyone). It also betrays a self-importance that assumes an exclusive association with the elite performers of a sport. By not wearing their colours out of some type of distant fan-mania, you are flattering yourself by association, which is pretty sad.

And why do these arbitrary restrictions end with certain forms of clothing? Don't we, by the same logic, have to earn the right too to wear pro team clothing as these are elite teams comprised of national and world champions? By this logic we shouldn't be riding pro-level bikes either as these are surely something to earn as well.

Cyclists endure real hardship at the hands of others, from negligent motorists to indifferent road and transport planners and authorities. The last thing any of us needs is to suffer condemnation from others who like to pedal.

Cycling isn't inherently competitve. If you think you're better or more important than the person you just blew past, or holier than thou because of the clothes you choose to wear whilst cycling, I am glad I don't suffer your friendship.
 
Jun 24, 2009
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CycloErgoSum said:
Recreational cyclists seem to be anything but going by their hang-ups. As a social group, we seem to have a lot in common with other groups like so-called 'outlaw' motorbike gangs when it comes to displaying our 'colours' even when we have no such affiliations.

Take, for example, the rainbow jersey. To say one has to earn the right to wear a white jersey with five colours on it seems to imply we belong to an association where these colours mean something in particular, like a high rank in some type of military or hierachical context. To say that somebody doesn't deserve to wear these colours is to say that somebody belongs to a corporate entity of some type, even if that person doesn't identify with this entity.

In short, why does riding a bicycle mean you belong to a hierachical group? I, for one, used to race many years ago and now ride for the fresh air, the birdsong, the fitness, the peace and the sheer joy of expanding my lungs. This crap about earning such and such a right smacks of elitism, conservatism and puritanism (which is three too many isms for anyone). It also betrays a self-importance that assumes an exclusive association with the elite performers of a sport. By not wearing their colours out of some type of distant fan-mania, you are flattering yourself by association, which is pretty sad.

And why do these arbitrary restrictions end with certain forms of clothing? Don't we, by the same logic, have to earn the right too to wear pro team clothing as these are elite teams comprised of national and world champions? By this logic we shouldn't be riding pro-level bikes either as these are surely something to earn as well.

Cyclists endure real hardship at the hands of others, from negligent motorists to indifferent road and transport planners and authorities. The last thing any of us needs is to suffer condemnation from others who like to pedal.

Cycling isn't inherently competitve. If you think you're better or more important than the person you just blew past, or holier than thou because of the clothes you choose to wear whilst cycling, I am glad I don't suffer your friendship.

Alright by me!! Good way to get off the ground! Welcome aboard, Enjoy.:) yourself
 
Oct 29, 2009
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racerralph said:
Alright by me!! Good way to get off the ground! Welcome aboard, Enjoy.:) yourself

Thanks for the welcome, racerralph, it's nice to be here. BTW, I like some of your jersey redesigns - to me they look even better without the company tags, especially the Saxo (which now bears a resemblance to the Estonian national colours!) Back in the day, and maybe this is still done, clubs used to base their designs on proteam jerseys. My old club was based on ONCE, while others had the Motorola colours and design.
 
Jun 19, 2009
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By the time you have the chops to pull off wearing a GT classification jersey in your weekend group, you're well past thinking it'd be cool.

I wear pro jerseys, club jerseys, brand jerseys (got a campy long-sleeve that's in like-new condition after 25 years), and no-name jerseys, but I pick them for looks. The '04 Brioches la Boulanger and '05 Illes Balears are my current faves. The only '09 jersey I'd want is the black Cervelo. The rest of the peloton were dressed by chance.

anthonygeslin.jpg


vkarpets.jpg
 
Jun 24, 2009
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derailleur said:
By the time you have the chops to pull off wearing a GT classification jersey in your weekend group, you're well past thinking it'd be cool.

I wear pro jerseys, club jerseys, brand jerseys (got a campy long-sleeve that's in like-new condition after 25 years), and no-name jerseys, but I pick them for looks. The '04 Brioches la Boulanger and '05 Illes Balears are my current faves.

I agree 100%! the Illes Balears colors were great, even when they mixed it up with Caisse D'Epargne. In fact, that's when the Caisse jersey looked the best, with that boisterous splash of colors on the black background, good stuff!:)
 
once you've been riding long enough, it wouldnt matter if you wore club colors or pro team colors. I keep away from the basic no print stuff because I have noticed that wearing pro team or club colors (matching bibs and jersey) gets you more respect from motorists (i.e they give more space to me when passing).
 
May 6, 2009
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Don't know about the rest of you guys, but I was reading an article with Columbia pro Adam Hansen, and he was talking about going training the full wearing the T-Mobile kit (this being 2007, the year that he joined), where motorists (ie male), slow down to have a perv thinking that it is a female, only to realise that it is a dude
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I have heard similar stories here.
 
Murray said:
+1

The whole matching ensemble really looks bad... shoes, socks, water bottles, cap, etc..

Respectfully disagree. To me, cycling -- or any of the other sports I've competed in throughout the years -- is simply an extension of who I am. And since I like to dress neatly, I carry that over into all aspects of my life -- thus I do match my riding clothes w/my bike and accessories.

An old man now, I no longer compete, thus I ride my bike purely for fitness purposes. That I get passed by all and sundry makes no difference to me...nor the way I chose to keep dressing to engage in my (current) favorite form of exercise.

Simply put, the whole ensemble makes me feel good. And at the end of the day that is the only thing that matters -- not what others might be reading into it.

Don't worry. Be happy.
 
Nov 2, 2009
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Standing behind the barricades at the final stage of the Jayco Herald Sun Tour a month or so ago, I met some older men in cycling kit. We got chatting. One of them was wearing a jersey and racing cap with the WC rainbow. I admired the cut of the cap, and the man mentioned something about having got the cap in Austria. I assumed it might have been a holiday souvenir.

It turned out he had won the 2002 WC Veterans 75+ road race.

He had also raced in the very first Sun Tour in 1952.

And at over 80 years of age, he had ridden 25 km to get to that day's street circuit. I hope he wears the gear every time he rides.
 
@Spare Tyre

At a "mere" 53 y.o. it's stories such as the one you posted that not only inspire me, but actually might make me re-think my current non-competitive attitude towards riding. Well that's not entirely true as I do compete against *myself*...but it does make me want to expand my horizons.

Anyway, appreciate your post and hope the old gent in your story has many years of competitive riding left in him.

TY.
 
Jun 24, 2009
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RedFury said:
Respectfully disagree. To me, cycling -- or any of the other sports I've competed in throughout the years -- is simply an extension of who I am. And since I like to dress neatly, I carry that over into all aspects of my life -- thus I do match my riding clothes w/my bike and accessories.

An old man now, I no longer compete, thus I ride my bike purely for fitness purposes. That I get passed by all and sundry makes no difference to me...nor the way I chose to keep dressing to engage in my (current) favorite form of exercise.

Simply put, the whole ensemble makes me feel good. And at the end of the day that is the only thing that matters -- not what others might be reading into it.

Don't worry. Be happy.

I couldn't agree with your thoughts more. You know who you are, and it sure sounds like you're happy in your own skin, not to mention whatever kit you choose to ride in, too!:)
Love life, and live it to the fullest!
 
Jul 22, 2009
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RedFury said:
@Spare Tyre

At a "mere" 53 y.o. it's stories such as the one you posted that not only inspire me, but actually might make me re-think my current non-competitive attitude towards riding. Well that's not entirely true as I do compete against *myself*...but it does make me want to expand my horizons.

Anyway, appreciate your post and hope the old gent in your story has many years of competitive riding left in him.

TY.

Competeing against oneself is perhaps the best, most honest form of competition, because it doesn't matter who you are, there will always be someone who is better than you, either genetically, equiptment, suitability for the course etc etc.- but going out and hammering a route or routine and trying to do better than before- that is a real race of truth, where you cannot deny your effort or lack thereof. Being able to beat someone who is less gifted or equipt, where is the glory ? Compare to being able to shave a few seconds off an absolute best time- there is a sense of true accomplishment. It may lack in crowds, but it gives winning a much deeper meaning.
 
Jun 24, 2009
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BTW, to borrow a little bit of this, from a little bit of that. Do you think that any NFL fans would really read these people the riot act, lay any kind of judgements down, or demand to know if wearing these jerseys was earned, or not?........I mean, I'm just wondering.:eek:
1zvx4l3.jpg
2i1pfdy.jpg
:p
 
Mar 18, 2009
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Spare Tyre said:
Standing behind the barricades at the final stage of the Jayco Herald Sun Tour a month or so ago, I met some older men in cycling kit. We got chatting. One of them was wearing a jersey and racing cap with the WC rainbow. I admired the cut of the cap, and the man mentioned something about having got the cap in Austria. I assumed it might have been a holiday souvenir.

It turned out he had won the 2002 WC Veterans 75+ road race.

He had also raced in the very first Sun Tour in 1952.

And at over 80 years of age, he had ridden 25 km to get to that day's street circuit. I hope he wears the gear every time he rides.

Great story. Thanks Spare Tyre.
 
May 6, 2009
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racerralph said:
BTW, to borrow a little bit of this, from a little bit of that. Do you think that any NFL fans would really read these people the riot act, lay any kind of judgements down, or demand to know if wearing these jerseys was earned, or not?........I mean, I'm just wondering.:eek:
1zvx4l3.jpg
2i1pfdy.jpg
:p

Nice fake b00bs.
 

buckwheat

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Sep 24, 2009
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pedaling squares said:
well I haven't seen anyone wearing the maillot jaune, but no doubt it would bring out some competitiveness and of course trash talk. Buddy would have to ride like a champion or hear about it forever.

I had the chance to buy some genuine Discovery Yellow Jerseys for $30 apiece and reasoned that I shouldn't.

Of course it looks ridiculous riding around or in a group ride, but you know what, who cares? If you have a good sense of humor and are sociable, what the heck difference does it make? They're selling the things, why not buy one?

Now I'm kind of kicking myself.
 

buckwheat

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Sep 24, 2009
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Gee333 said:
I have a Toyota United long sleeved jersey I bought when the ToC Prologue was in San Francisco in 2007. I got it because it was lined and cheap. I think it's the 2006 jersey. And I got it because I had just moved back to SF from Texas so I didn't have any long sleeved jerseys or arm warmers to fight the cold coastal winds and fog. I also have a ToC Most Aggresive jersey I won in a contest.

But to be honest with you, I stopped wearing the Toyota jersey because of comments I saw on various forums that said it was faux pas. Plus it is kind of loud. But it is warm. I still wear the ToC jersey though because I like the way it looks and I did win it... just not for my cycling skills (or lack thereof) haha!

I hate to say it but I, too, am a slave to the cycling snobs. It seems that many feel the same way as the masses do on here that you shouldn't wear team kit.

But I'm fighting the feeling that if you can wear a jersey of your favorite baseball team, football team, fubol team, etc. why then can't you wear a jersey of your favorite cycling team? Why must you be a Pro to wear it?

So I'm torn. I like lots of team kits out there but I'm still apprehensive when it comes to actually buying and wearing one now.

I guess I'll continue to wear the kit of the site my friend works at and that I freelance for occassionally. <shrugs>

They're selling it for a reason. If you have the money and want it, buy it and wear it.

This is a very silly thread.
 
Mar 10, 2009
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only question that needs to be asked is should I get the ISD kit ? It was designed by Cipo and has his name on it too. The man is a legend and love the outrageous stuff he used to wear when he was racing