Teams & Riders The Remco Evenepoel is the next Eddy Merckx thread

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According to PCS 40 days, which isn't out of this world. 1 month no races after Liège. 2 weeks between Norway and the TdS.
41 race days after Switzerland. 43 after the NC. That's a lot at this moment of the season, for a youngster that still wants to peak in August and September. No races after Liège and 2 weeks after Norway does not have much influence, because he was then fully training. Not resting.
The number of race days is one aspect. But not resting enough (so training again) is an important negative aspect.
 
41 race days after Switzerland. 43 after the NC. That's a lot at this moment of the season, for a youngster that still wants to peak in August and September. No races after Liège and 2 weeks after Norway does not have much influence, because he was then fully training. Not resting.
The number of race days is one aspect. But not resting enough (so training again) is an important negative aspect.
it is a lot of race days, imo.

also he has entered every single one of them with the idea of winning or podium. apart from FW, but even then he was working hard for Ala up until the last km, helping to position him.

i also wonder whether his personality (to always compete) also needs to be monitored more during "rest" and even training. I wonder if he consistently goes "too hard"...

I know that when I used to compete in TTs, I would often feel like I needed to "see" how fast I was able to go, constantly testing my legs even up to the day before to reassure myself. The time I did this the most I ended up with my worst result.
 
I know that when I used to compete in TTs, I would often feel like I needed to "see" how fast I was able to go, constantly testing my legs even up to the day before to reassure myself. The time I did this the most I ended up with my worst result.
Surely they check his parameters on a weekly bases? If he's overtraining they would notice it.
I think there are a lot of factors why he's not performing as we expected a few years ago;

  • more bulk to be more explosive that costs him in endurance
  • he/they still have seemed to figure out what kind of preparation makes him the best
  • can't rule out that there are still physical effects that hinder him from has lombardy fall
  • don't underestimate the battles that rage in his head. Until his fall in Lombardy he won everywhere he started (almost literally). Since then he has struggled and never underestimate what doubts in the head can do with the leggs
  • pressure on him might just costs him a couple of % that might be the difference between hanging in there or having to let go
Still, he's prefectly on his scedule to some day win a grand tour à la Wiggins or Thomas. But it'll take him a few more years to figure out what needs to be done to be top tier for 3 weeks.
As far as one day races are concerned: Literally every one day race is up for grabs for him besides perhaps Fleche, MSR and roubaix. And even those 3 might not be out of his reach if the race itself unfolds into his favour.
 
it is a lot of race days, imo.

also he has entered every single one of them with the idea of winning or podium. apart from FW, but even then he was working hard for Ala up until the last km, helping to position him.

i also wonder whether his personality (to always compete) also needs to be monitored more during "rest" and even training. I wonder if he consistently goes "too hard"...

I know that when I used to compete in TTs, I would often feel like I needed to "see" how fast I was able to go, constantly testing my legs even up to the day before to reassure myself. The time I did this the most I ended up with my worst result.
Wasn't an issue of too many days

Take Armstrong in 2003. He suffered from the heat in the TT, shedding a boat load of time to Ullrich. He was then dropped on back to back days in the Pyrenees before recovering on day 3.

Exact same thing that happened to Remco here. He probably wins the race if he just chooses the proper helmet. That is partially on Quikstep. What in the world were they doing? Are they that oblivious?
 
As far as one day races are concerned: Literally every one day race is up for grabs for him besides perhaps Fleche, MSR and roubaix. And even those 3 might not be out of his reach if the race itself unfolds into his favour.
He can win MSR without something weird happening. His chance isn’t great because it’s always a lottery among twenty possible winners and he has to win solo, but it would be in no way a shock if he pulled it off.
 
He can win MSR without something weird happening. His chance isn’t great because it’s always a lottery among twenty possible winners and he has to win solo, but it would be in no way a shock if he pulled it off.
He has a bigger chance to win Amstel, Lombardy, Brabantse Pijl, WC, Harelbeke and so on. Fleche Walloon, MSR or Roubaix (and even rond v vlaanderen) are usually targeted by a very specific crowd; punchers, sprinters, 75 kgs classic type riders. He'll never be any of those. But in either what race, you can never aford to give him 20 seconds lead without at least 4-5 good domestiques still there to chase.
 
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He has a bigger chance to win Amstel, Lombardy, Brabantse Pijl, WC, Harelbeke and so on. Fleche Walloon, MSR or Roubaix (and even rond v vlaanderen) are usually targeted by a very specific crowd; punchers, sprinters, 75 kgs classic type riders. He'll never be any of those. But in either what race, you can never aford to give him 20 seconds lead without at least 4-5 good domestiques still there to chase.
I would think Remco to be better at RVV than at Amstel or FW. Seeing what Pogacar did this year, I don't see why an in form Remco wouldnt contest.
 
He can win MSR without something weird happening. His chance isn’t great because it’s always a lottery among twenty possible winners and he has to win solo, but it would be in no way a shock if he pulled it off.
It's hard for me to see how that would play out. The gaps even the best puncheurs can get are relatively small in the best of circumstances, and then they have to descend brilliantly to hold it. While he's certainly improved as a descender, I just am not sure he's ever going to be good enough in that aspect to hold a lead.
 
It's hard for me to see how that would play out. The gaps even the best puncheurs can get are relatively small in the best of circumstances, and then they have to descend brilliantly to hold it. While he's certainly improved as a descender, I just am not sure he's ever going to be good enough in that aspect to hold a lead.
He could attack where Stuyven/Kragh Andersen attacked, it doesn't have to be on the climb.

I would think Remco to be better at RVV than at Amstel or FW. Seeing what Pogacar did this year, I don't see why an in form Remco wouldnt contest.
I think Amstel would suit him best of those. It resembles best the hilly terrain where he has often been successful with a solo.
 
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yep... he's recovered from overheating

Good to learn that lesson at a young age in Suisse than to blow a TDF lead making that same mistake
Well not sure about the lesson, he was overheating again because he lost his bidon :p

But yeah, looks much sharper and kept his pace constant (where in sweden he seemed to drop of). Hopefully a good ride in BK RR.. will be very hard to win here given the parcour but still... at least we expect animo!
 
Well not sure about the lesson, he was overheating again because he lost his bidon :p

But yeah, looks much sharper and kept his pace constant (where in sweden he seemed to drop of). Hopefully a good ride in BK RR.. will be very hard to win here given the parcour but still... at least we expect animo!
His pace actually increased throughout the race.

Check point 1: 13:31
Check Point 2: 26:58 (13:27)
Final 40:22 (13:24)
 
It was his 32nd title today. If I count it right on PCS, Merckx has also 32 titles at the same age. So maybe he is the new Merckx after all!? :)) Merckx didn't win a GT yet but had 2 MSR titles vs 1 LBL title for Evenepoel so lets conclude that Evenepoel is still (just) behind the legend ;)

I don't want to start an other Merckx comparison discussion. Let's forget about that. I do wonder how many pro's have so many titles at such a young age? Pogacar comes close. I assume there are also a few with a good sprint in that list (like Merckx). For somebody without a sprint it's probably rather unique.
 
If he keeps eating as much as he did when he weighted 60 kg then he will be back at 60 kg soon and apparantly that is not the plan. I can't imagine they put him on a diet when he needs the calories simply to fill his energy tank. Frankly, after the numerous errors in that 5th TdS stage I start to wonder if they actually watch over him at all? Clothing, supplies, use of ice, etc is apparantly all up to the rider's choice. Other teams basically count the grams each rider takes prior to each stage but at QST it looks like there is no plan and if there is a plan it's not executed in detail. Experience obviously helps in doing the right things but I assume they know that their leader has the least experience of all!

I start to believe that the only thing the team really cares about at the moment are the classics. That's why you train somebody getting a better punch. In the mean time they let him play in stage races of 1 week to get "experience" but without the same support. Maybe they do it differently in the Vuelta? I am not that sure. Stage wins could be the real goal here. They know he can succeed in both hilly stages and the TT.
I have trouble imagining having an opinion on his nutrition and weight without knowing the details of his physiological testing or how we could know exactly what QuickStep is doing with his nutrition. We don't have a clue what he's eating or how much. How do we know what he weighs? Team given weights are the biggest bunch of BS "info" in the sport.

Anyway, watching his training like this is pointless. I think fair to say he might to better as a GC rider on a team with more GC experience, but dissecting it to this level...not sure I get that.
 
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From https://www.demorgen.be/sport/een-onderdeel-van-ronderenner-zijn-beheers-ik-al-nu-nog-klimmen-remco-evenepoel-toont-zich-van-zijn-beste-kant-op-bk-tijdrijden~b60ee073/

NEXT GOAL THIS YEAR: 'WIN A STAGE IN THE VUELTA'
Before the World Cup, he has another important appointment: the Vuelta a España. “The Vuelta is a big goal. I go there to try something good. The most important thing is that I can win a stage and that I can follow uphill. Stage 10 is a time trial. I already know it quite well, that stage is also a goal.”

Evenepoel is not talking about the classification. He wanted to talk about something else. “I'm sure I just need more experience. I already master one part of being a GC racer and that is the time trials. Now I have to keep working on the climbing. We will do that in the coming months. The Vuelta will be the next step. Then maybe some questions can be answered. In any case, you always have to rehearse and study before you can take an exam.”

He referred, among other things, to the Tour de Suisse. “That was the first time I raced above 2,000 meters. I felt I was missing experience there, I just haven't done that enough. When we went really high, I couldn't accelerate like the rest. But this is still only my fifth year on a bike. I think a lot of riders sit on their bikes for much longer before they become champions for the first time. I am sure that over the years I will put even more stability in my performance. In the meantime, I'm not going to let my head be fooled anymore, like I did last year."
Sounds like a mature approach to the Vuelta. Don't expect a GC result, just go there to learn. And try to win a stage.
 
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^ This part is interesting:


"Is Evenepoel in the right team to become the rider he wants? QuickStep has the DNA of the classics in its body, much less that of stage races.

But he has no doubts. Yes, he can develop further in this environment, also because the team will continue to grow.

“Patrick Lefevere had warned me in advance that 2022 was going to be a transition year. Next year there will be a new sponsor and also a little more budget. I trust him in that. They have to give me time, but I also have to be patient with the team. That works in two directions.”

“I have no say in where that extra budget will go. I think it will go to riders as well as internships, support and medical supervision. Basically all of it. I think we can learn from Jumbo, Ineos and Bora. We have to try to copy them, but that is not easy, because we get very little inside information.”
 

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