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Teams & Riders The Remco Evenepoel is the next Eddy Merckx thread

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Campenaerts: "I have no words. I've never seen someone riding that hard as Remco did. Following him was one thing, but taking turns was something else. I'm not fully convinced that I would have been able to keep up with Evenepoel to the finish line."

"I'm not really sure what happened in that turn. Maybe because of fatigue or maybe I made a little steering error, I don't know. It is a pity!"

"I do know how to ride a bike myself, but now I understand what other riders were experiencing last week in the Hammer Series and last year at the junior world championship."
 
Re:

Wvv said:
Campenaerts: "I have no words. I've never seen someone riding that hard as Remco did. Following him was one thing, but taking turns was something else. I'm not fully convinced that I would have been able to keep up with Evenepoel to the finish line."

"I'm not really sure what happened in that turn. Maybe because of fatigue or maybe I made a little steering error, I don't know. It is a pity!"

"I do know how to ride a bike myself, but now I understand what other riders were experiencing last week in the Hammer Series and last year at the junior world championship."
Immense praise, really. And this is not a scrub like the late Chris Anker Sørensen or Benjamin Noval, but a real bikerider who just got totally smashed in the wheel of Remco. Wow!
 
Re:

Wvv said:
Campenaerts: "I have no words. I've never seen someone riding that hard as Remco did. Following him was one thing, but taking turns was something else. I'm not fully convinced that I would have been able to keep up with Evenepoel to the finish line."

"I'm not really sure what happened in that turn. Maybe because of fatigue or maybe I made a little steering error, I don't know. It is a pity!"

"I do know how to ride a bike myself, but now I understand what other riders were experiencing last week in the Hammer Series and last year at the junior world championship."

I love this. So glad to see a young guy come up with this kind of power and inspire this kind of wonder in outstanding professionals. Cannot wait to see what he does.

How refreshing to see such a talent. It's been a long, long time.
 
Re: Re:

Valv.Piti said:
Wvv said:
Campenaerts: "I have no words. I've never seen someone riding that hard as Remco did. Following him was one thing, but taking turns was something else. I'm not fully convinced that I would have been able to keep up with Evenepoel to the finish line."

"I'm not really sure what happened in that turn. Maybe because of fatigue or maybe I made a little steering error, I don't know. It is a pity!"

"I do know how to ride a bike myself, but now I understand what other riders were experiencing last week in the Hammer Series and last year at the junior world championship."
Immense praise, really. And this is not a scrub like the late Chris Anker Sørensen or Benjamin Noval, but a real bikerider who just got totally smashed in the wheel of Remco. Wow!

"The late Chris Anker Sørensen". I really think he's still alive...

But yeah, pretty insane performance by Remco. What an absolute freak of nature.
 
Re: Re:

tobydawq said:
Valv.Piti said:
Wvv said:
Campenaerts: "I have no words. I've never seen someone riding that hard as Remco did. Following him was one thing, but taking turns was something else. I'm not fully convinced that I would have been able to keep up with Evenepoel to the finish line."

"I'm not really sure what happened in that turn. Maybe because of fatigue or maybe I made a little steering error, I don't know. It is a pity!"

"I do know how to ride a bike myself, but now I understand what other riders were experiencing last week in the Hammer Series and last year at the junior world championship."
Immense praise, really. And this is not a scrub like the late Chris Anker Sørensen or Benjamin Noval, but a real bikerider who just got totally smashed in the wheel of Remco. Wow!

"The late Chris Anker Sørensen". I really think he's still alive...

But yeah, pretty insane performance by Remco. What an absolute freak of nature.
Yeah, Im not that good at english unfortunately. What I was meant was obviously in the later stages of their respective careers. :D
 
Re:

Red Rick said:
His results so far seem much more TT and rouleur heavy than anything else.

He's a steam engine, and he doesn't care if there is wind, or a mountain, he just powers through. It's the same way he climbs. He rides the exact same way uphill as how he killed Campenaerts on the semi flat. Puts his ass down, and starts pumping. But his results in UAE and Turkey don't lie. He goes uphill fast too. Don't worry. In the UAE tour, he got dropped very early in the climb, one of the first. And then he just set a pace, and passed maybe 80 or so riders (Porte, Nibali, Sivakov, Lambrecht...) and finished within one minute of Valverde & Gaudu, right behind Dumoulin & Kelderman.

They should put a sticker on his back "keep on trucking".

red_flanders said:
Wvv said:
Campenaerts: "I have no words. I've never seen someone riding that hard as Remco did. Following him was one thing, but taking turns was something else. I'm not fully convinced that I would have been able to keep up with Evenepoel to the finish line."

"I'm not really sure what happened in that turn. Maybe because of fatigue or maybe I made a little steering error, I don't know. It is a pity!"

"I do know how to ride a bike myself, but now I understand what other riders were experiencing last week in the Hammer Series and last year at the junior world championship."

I love this. So glad to see a young guy come up with this kind of power and inspire this kind of wonder in outstanding professionals. Cannot wait to see what he does.

How refreshing to see such a talent. It's been a long, long time.

There have been other talents, but what makes it so refreshing is the absolute naivety with which he races. The thing they normally teach kids, at a far earlier age NOT to do. Not to attack all the time, not to attack from too far away... because it's not sustainable, because you need to manage your energy. "*** that", he thinks. He just happens to have the engine to back it up. The fact that he races just the same way vs guys twice his age (literally, yesterday Weening was with him in the break) is the way he raced vs 17-18 year olds last year. And thank god he did/does, or we wouln't have known what he was capable of. Had he raced the way the other kids were taught to race. He wouldn't have won nearly as much, because he can't rely on a sprint, and by saving himself, he wouldn't have made the race tough for the other kids. Maybe he would even have dropped out because he didn't like it and got bored, or only developed as an ITT'er.

I remember last year, after he won the WC and it had been known he'd skip the U23. A lot of riders, including De Gendt, saying he'd be amazed about how fast the pro's ride. He'd be lucky not to get blown out the back of the peloton in a windy or hilly race. Fast forward 8 months and the peloton is hanging on for dear life. :lol: :D

In fact, the only rider that has a little bit of the same vibe going, is Mathieu van der Poel. But, Remco is that x5. From kilometer 60 (to go) on, he attacked about every 5 km. That's why Jakobsen was angry at him "you're choking me to death", Jakobsen told him.
 
Re: Re:

Logic-is-your-friend said:
red_flanders said:
Wvv said:
Campenaerts: "I have no words. I've never seen someone riding that hard as Remco did. Following him was one thing, but taking turns was something else. I'm not fully convinced that I would have been able to keep up with Evenepoel to the finish line."

"I'm not really sure what happened in that turn. Maybe because of fatigue or maybe I made a little steering error, I don't know. It is a pity!"

"I do know how to ride a bike myself, but now I understand what other riders were experiencing last week in the Hammer Series and last year at the junior world championship."

I love this. So glad to see a young guy come up with this kind of power and inspire this kind of wonder in outstanding professionals. Cannot wait to see what he does.

How refreshing to see such a talent. It's been a long, long time.

There have been other talents, but what makes it so refreshing is the absolute naivety with which he races. The thing they normally teach kids, at a far earlier age NOT to do. Not to attack all the time, not to attack from too far away... because it's not sustainable, because you need to manage your energy. "**** that", he thinks. He just happens to have the engine to back it up.

I haven't seen anyone like this since the 80's. At least that's what I think right now, but I can't name anyone who has inspired this kind of awe in seasoned pros since then.

He rides like he does because he has the engine, rather than he rides like he does and happens to have the engine to back it up. IMO. It's just a natural result of being so strong.

I'm excited about the kid!
 
I honestly think, it's because he only started cycling 26 months ago. By age 18, they would have drilled it into his head, not to attack from far, not to attack every 5 minutes had he been cycling since he was a small kid... but since he only started at age 17, he isn't burdened with conventional wisdom, lol. I think that's the main reason why he races like he did, and by doing so, discovered his superpowers :)

Today 4th in the ITT at 3 seconds. But it was only a short one (9k).
 
Who the hell would drill a kid to attack less/ride more conservatively.

MVDP is doing bike races from the age you're allowed to, yet still attacks at places where everyone would say it's stupid but he's just that strong it doesn't matter. Same goes for Remco. For now, that is. He'll surely tone it down when he faces stronger riders.
 
Re:

Flamin said:
Who the hell would drill a kid to attack less/ride more conservatively.

MVDP is doing bike races from the age you're allowed to, yet still attacks at places where everyone would say it's stupid but he's just that strong it doesn't matter. Same goes for Remco. For now, that is. He'll surely tone it down when he faces stronger riders.
Probably about every father that wants his boy to win.
 
Re: Re:

Logic-is-your-friend said:
Flamin said:
Who the hell would drill a kid to attack less/ride more conservatively.

MVDP is doing bike races from the age you're allowed to, yet still attacks at places where everyone would say it's stupid but he's just that strong it doesn't matter. Same goes for Remco. For now, that is. He'll surely tone it down when he faces stronger riders.
Probably about every father that wants his boy to win.
Recently saw a documentary about Boonen where Boonen kept riding stupid in juniors and his dad just said "You're not gonna attack next time" and he won the bunch sprint by a few seconds
 
Re: Re:

Red Rick said:
Logic-is-your-friend said:
Flamin said:
Who the hell would drill a kid to attack less/ride more conservatively.

MVDP is doing bike races from the age you're allowed to, yet still attacks at places where everyone would say it's stupid but he's just that strong it doesn't matter. Same goes for Remco. For now, that is. He'll surely tone it down when he faces stronger riders.
Probably about every father that wants his boy to win.
Recently saw a documentary about Boonen where Boonen kept riding stupid in juniors and his dad just said "You're not gonna attack next time" and he won the bunch sprint by a few seconds
But it was probably all that stupid riding that made sure he developed the necessary power and knowledge of his limits.
 
Re: Re:

Squire said:
Red Rick said:
Logic-is-your-friend said:
Flamin said:
Who the hell would drill a kid to attack less/ride more conservatively.

MVDP is doing bike races from the age you're allowed to, yet still attacks at places where everyone would say it's stupid but he's just that strong it doesn't matter. Same goes for Remco. For now, that is. He'll surely tone it down when he faces stronger riders.
Probably about every father that wants his boy to win.
Recently saw a documentary about Boonen where Boonen kept riding stupid in juniors and his dad just said "You're not gonna attack next time" and he won the bunch sprint by a few seconds
But it was probably all that stupid riding that made sure he developed the necessary power and knowledge of his limits.
Which was the point i was making.
 
Re: Re:

Logic-is-your-friend said:
Flamin said:
Who the hell would drill a kid to attack less/ride more conservatively.

MVDP is doing bike races from the age you're allowed to, yet still attacks at places where everyone would say it's stupid but he's just that strong it doesn't matter. Same goes for Remco. For now, that is. He'll surely tone it down when he faces stronger riders.
Probably about every father that wants his boy to win.

Fathers, lol. Surely those deluded examples who think their kid is by far the most talented, aren't the benchmark, right? :eek:

Having fun should be what's it all about, and I'm sure that's how youth teams work as well. Winning is a nice bonus and you can give those kids tips in trying to do so. But I don't believe for a second that they teach them to ride like they do in the pro peloton.
 
Re: Re:

Red Rick said:
Logic-is-your-friend said:
Flamin said:
Who the hell would drill a kid to attack less/ride more conservatively.

MVDP is doing bike races from the age you're allowed to, yet still attacks at places where everyone would say it's stupid but he's just that strong it doesn't matter. Same goes for Remco. For now, that is. He'll surely tone it down when he faces stronger riders.
Probably about every father that wants his boy to win.
Recently saw a documentary about Boonen where Boonen kept riding stupid in juniors and his dad just said "You're not gonna attack next time" and he won the bunch sprint by a few seconds

His father said that indeed because Tommeke was getting more and more frustrated. That's completely different obviously than actively encouraging a kid to ride defensively.