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The Women's Road Racing Thread 2017

Page 25 - Get up to date with the latest news, scores & standings from the Cycling News Community.
Re: Re:

jaylew said:
PremierAndrew said:
Gigs_98 said:
TourOfSardinia said:
Alexandre B. said:
Splendid race of Simon Garfoot.
it worked though for silver
:(
At the same time she now knows that she would be world champion if she hadn't f*cked up the chase.

I mean no, she would probs have been beaten in the sprint by van der bregen if she'd chased

But no respect for anyone who doesn't race to win, and only the dutchies and barnes rode to win there
Barnes messed up as well. You can't let a Dutch rider attack in that scenario, wait until there is a 20 second gap to start chasing and then when you finally do not go all out. Unless she was the one who had just brought back Van Vleuten but I thought that was Kasia?

In any case, very well-deserved win. She crashed, chased solo, and went on the attack multiple times.

Barnes was in two breaks, many km, and was just cooked I think.

Dutch deserved it and for Blaak to do it after the crash is really nice, clearly she was strong today.

Nice course. Whenever I see Norway in the sunshine, I want to go there.
 
Apr 11, 2011
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Barnes was advised to pick one of the Dutch wheels and stick to it - unfortunately she didn't choose Blaaks. Maybe she could have jumped to Blaak but then the others would have looked to her when the next Dutch rider attacked. It was very disappointing that there was a lack of cooperation from the chasers and in particular Garfoot. It seems she was happy to settle for second which makes her reaction at the line all the more bizarre. Disappointed for the Brits today given how well they rode in both races.
 
Re:

Jaunty Monty said:
Barnes was advised to pick one of the Dutch wheels and stick to it - unfortunately she didn't choose Blaaks. Maybe she could have jumped to Blaak but then the others would have looked to her when the next Dutch rider attacked. It was very disappointing that there was a lack of cooperation from the chasers and in particular Garfoot. It seems she was happy to settle for second which makes her reaction at the line all the more bizarre. Disappointed for the Brits today given how well they rode in both races.

To be honest, they shouldn't have been all in for Lizzie today, given her recent issues. Barnes had been on the attack all day, burnt too many matches early, and I have a feeling she would have been 4th or 5th if the 7 had sprinted it out. Great ride from her though. The onus really was on Garfoot to chase Blaak down and she dogged it. The really annoying thing was how it paid off for her.
 
I thought Niewiadoma tried tbh, but Barnes and Cordon had nothing to really give, neither of the two Dutch were going to chase. Garfoot was despicable and annoyed the hell out of me that she got 2nd place. They'd have caught Blaak if she rode through after Niewiadoma's attack that brought it back to 12 seconds.
 
craigmalone said:
I thought Niewiadoma tried tbh, but Barnes and Cordon had nothing to really give, neither of the two Dutch were going to chase. Garfoot was despicable and annoyed the hell out of me that she got 2nd place. They'd have caught Blaak if she rode through after Niewiadoma's attack that brought it back to 12 seconds.
Do Australians ride more negatively, generally, than other nations? Im inclined to say yes
 
craigmalone said:
I thought Niewiadoma tried tbh, but Barnes and Cordon had nothing to really give, neither of the two Dutch were going to chase. Garfoot was despicable and annoyed the hell out of me that she got 2nd place. They'd have caught Blaak if she rode through after Niewiadoma's attack that brought it back to 12 seconds.

This sums it up perfectly for me. I assumed Garfoot was nailed on in a sprint the way she rode, but also the Dutch had it sewn up. I think Van der Breggen would have won if it came back together, but Niewaidoma did look strong as well. Everyone complains about the negative racing, but it is these intricacies and tactics that make cycling so interesting for me. Far more interesting than watching one team control things so their sprinter can ride 200m to win a World title.
 
Having seen it now, I quite liked the race. Certainly better than I expected with this course. At first glance it looked like it would be a boring straight shootout between attackers from the last climb to the line.

As predicted, some corners are quite dangerous and it's good there was no rain or there would be so many crashes. Hearing whoever it was crying in pain after that main crash was really unpleasant.

yaco said:
Imagine AVV will be upset because Garfoot's negative racing cost her a medal - And they are team-mates at Orica.

Probably not for long. Garfoot's considering retirement to have a kid

In any case, while it was perfectly in character for an australian rider to wheelsuck the entire race, it wasn't in character for Garfoot (not to mention she isn't really australian). It's like she was possessed by the ghost of Michael Matthews.

edit: She says she thought van der Breggen or van Vleuten might chase.....WAT? That's...definitely Matthews level reasoning there.
 
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Eyeballs Out said:
Garfoot would have been worked over by the dutch regardless of what she did. There was no possible way for a non-dutch rider to win that race

That's about the sum of it. Whilst watching, I was as critical as many here but the hard reality was that once the non-Dutchies failed to mark Blaak's move (either due to out of gas or more concentrated on AVV or VDB); they were only over going to be "worked over" by VDB & AVV. Whilst they would've liked to medal themselves, they were quite prepared to have their group reeled in by the following group in order that their team-mate would win. Perhaps to satisfy the "aesthetes" here, both Garfoot & Niewiadoma should've continued to launch forlorn hope after forlorn hope but there was no way any of those attempts would've stuck.
 
Re: Re:

dirkprovin said:
Eyeballs Out said:
Garfoot would have been worked over by the dutch regardless of what she did. There was no possible way for a non-dutch rider to win that race

That's about the sum of it. Whilst watching, I was as critical as many here but the hard reality was that once the non-Dutchies failed to mark Blaak's move (either due to out of gas or more concentrated on AVV or VDB); they were only over going to be "worked over" by VDB & AVV.
Exactly the point I was making. It was over the second they let Blaak get up the road. The one thing they couldn't do was let that happen and they all just sat there looking at each other because no one wanted to be the one to grab her wheel.
 
Re:

yaco said:
Missed opportunity for Garfoot - Reckon she was the strongest rider in the race, and if she'd shown more initiative when Blaak attacked, believe she could have won solo - Never seen Garfoot sprint so well - Garfoot is actually German who married an Aussie who introduced her to cycling when she was 29, so she's done well as a newcomer to cycling - Actually the non-deserving medal was Didrieksen who got her medal by default because the chase group sat up - Imagine AVV will be upset because Garfoot's negative racing cost her a medal - And they are team-mates at Orica.

She still had to do well enough in the sprint to actually get the medal. I hardly think the other riders just went; "Right, we caught the chase, then we'll let Amalie get her medal."
It's entirely possible she might have faltered completely in the sprint, or just been good, but still oversprinted by enough people to miss out on the medals.
 
Re:

GuyIncognito said:
Having seen it now, I quite liked the race. Certainly better than I expected with this course. At first glance it looked like it would be a boring straight shootout between attackers from the last climb to the line.

As predicted, some corners are quite dangerous and it's good there was no rain or there would be so many crashes. Hearing whoever it was crying in pain after that main crash was really unpleasant.

yaco said:
Imagine AVV will be upset because Garfoot's negative racing cost her a medal - And they are team-mates at Orica.

Probably not for long. Garfoot's considering retirement to have a kid

In any case, while it was perfectly in character for an australian rider to wheelsuck the entire race, it wasn't in character for Garfoot (not to mention she isn't really australian). It's like she was possessed by the ghost of Michael Matthews.

edit: She says she thought van der Breggen or van Vleuten might chase.....WAT? That's...definitely Matthews level reasoning there.

Women's cyclists on the whole are poorly paid, so it can be a battle to make ends meet - Garfoot has mentioned more than once that she will re-consider her future in the sport - Must also mention that Aussie cyclists receive money for medals won at Olympics and World's, so this may have been a consideration in Garfoot's mind, notwithstanding the honour of a bronze and silver at the World's - Definitely think Garfoot can win a gold medal in the ITT in the future, if she continues cycling - I believe she is riding on in 2018, but beyond that is anyone's guess - Finally, I doubt Van De Breggen had the legs to win yesteray as she was hanging on for dear life after any attacks.
 
Re: Re:

RedheadDane said:
yaco said:
Missed opportunity for Garfoot - Reckon she was the strongest rider in the race, and if she'd shown more initiative when Blaak attacked, believe she could have won solo - Never seen Garfoot sprint so well - Garfoot is actually German who married an Aussie who introduced her to cycling when she was 29, so she's done well as a newcomer to cycling - Actually the non-deserving medal was Didrieksen who got her medal by default because the chase group sat up - Imagine AVV will be upset because Garfoot's negative racing cost her a medal - And they are team-mates at Orica.

She still had to do well enough in the sprint to actually get the medal. I hardly think the other riders just went; "Right, we caught the chase, then we'll let Amalie get her medal."
It's entirely possible she might have faltered completely in the sprint, or just been good, but still oversprinted by enough people to miss out on the medals.

The reality is race tactics played their part in Diedriksen getting a bronze medal - In saying that, she was a million miles back after the last climb
 
It was probably over when the final group had three Dutch from seven, as long as they don’t wait for a sprint. If the others had gone with Blaak, the next attack, or the next, would have been the one.

Blaaki was arguably most likely to make one stick, given that she’d crashed and the other two were always likely to be perceived as more dangerous. But really, it reflects the dominance of the Dutch women – they are the leading nation and the top ranked by a mile. Maybe, on a different day, there could have been two GB or two Aussies in that final group and a different dynamic, but the Dutch are always likely to have a superior presence in the final of a tough race like that. They have five of the top fifteen in the UCI ranking.

Best race of the week for my money.
 
Re:

yaco said:
Will add, I am surprised anyone is shocked that Blaak won the RR - She is a quality cyclist who rode for the strongest team - The Dutch team was so strong.

She's a quality cyclist who rides/rode (depending on how you look at it) for a team that has Annemiek Van Vleuten, and Anna Van Der Breggen. She wasn't exactly the Dutch team's first choice, was she?
 
No, but at the same time she certainly wasn't the last choice either on a course like this. That's why they put her in the break, she was too dangerous to other teams to be allowed that much space, and as somebody that the Dutch could likely trust to take it home from the group they had up the road; with the likes of Vos and Pieters for a sprint and van der Breggen and van Vleuten for a more selective outcome also in the race she could sit up and make the others do the work if it came to it in the latter stages, they would hope that she could outclimb Barnes (although Barnes has been really impressively durable this season it must be said) and outsprint Cordon-Ragot, so if that group succeeded, they'd have the upper hand.

It's not surprising that the Dutch would outnumber the other teams at the end, especially once Longo Borghini was out, leaving Italy a bit less strong up front and reliant on a few interesting moves that weren't given the leeway they might have hoped. It's no secret that I'm a fan of Rossella Ratto, and I was happy to see that she was strong and taking those risks late on in such a long race; the fallout from the Estado de México collapse and that she's never settled at a team has been a real staller for her development, after such a great start to her career, but ultimately when the A-listers put their cards on the table, the Italians had no response. It was intriguing that the Dutch would take control of the pacing, although whether that was in the intention of allowing Blaaki the freedom not to work up front or because they had a chaque that the gap wasn't enough and wanted to burn off sprinters I'm not sure. It certainly wasn't surprising that the big attack to make the selection came from Niewiadoma, but the problem that is the super-strength marchers in orange meant that even once she'd trimmed the group of those who had looked strong in the initial forays, such as Ferrand-Prévot, and made it into the selection that we thought would contest the medals, the Dutch held all the cards and realistically it was just a matter of which of them was away when the elastic snapped.

Now, it may not have been Chantal's original move that had had this effect had Garfoot contributed, sure, and I suspect this gambit was similar to the Spanish one in 2009 that eventually cost them the gold in the men's RR, with Rodríguez, who had been in the early break, the one to attack, so when Evans shook Samu and Valverde off his wheel, they were left waiting on Cancellara, while the exhausted Rodríguez couldn't answer Evans' attack - send the most tired rider up the road first, to foster indecision in the chase with two fresh riders sitting on. And Blaak is plenty strong enough to pull it off from that kind of position, as we've seen from previous solo wins in places like the Boels Rentals Tour and Gent-Wevelgem. It is ironic, therefore, that Australia have picked up (and not without reason) this reputation for negative racing in the major one day events in national teams, yet the one time they've successfully taken it to the house was with a rider with a negative reputation taking unexpected risks and completely rejuvenating himself. Ultimately, the chase had to be led by Kasia and Garfoot, because Barnes and Cordon were willing contributors but were exhausted; Kasia did her bit but she also has the problem that of the 7, in a sprint to the line you would expect her to have little to no chance. She's also spent a lot of the last two seasons getting worked over when isolated in similar fashion, doing far more work than she should and getting dusted in the sprint at the end, or left behind by opposition doing the double or triple team, be it Boels or Wiggle or Orica in the trade events, or the Dutch or Australians in the national events. Garfoot's gambit may have been less negatively received had she not done a Gerrans and then acted upset by the silver medal. Ultimately, we should remember Emma Johansson at the Olympics. She still got a silver, when she would win a sprint vs. van der Breggen 9 times out of 10, and if she sat on and let Mara win, she'd have won the sprint for silver and not lost anything. But she sacrificed her sprint in order to have a chance to sprint for the gold. Emma had a right to be disappointed. If you didn't contribute to the chase in the hope of winning the sprint, you have no right to be upset that that sprint is for a silver medal.

Now, in response to the comment about Amalie being the lucky medal, let it be known that I agree. That doesn't mean I don't wholelheartedly respect her defence of her championship, but that sextet behind Blaak should never have been caught. Yes, that's mainly due to them essentially being limited in numbers due to having at least 2 (arguably 3 with Garfoot not contributing) passengers, so while it's great of the bunch not to have given up in pursuit of the minor medals, and she deserves it for having that sprint left and being the best of the sprinters behind, she also can count herself lucky to have been granted that opportunity by the group in front.

It was interesting that the UK team decided to spend Barnes on that early move, clearly Lizzie was as usual the main plan, but it actually shows evidence of a plan B. However, having her used like that so early in the race did have a negative effect in the long run, in that she was clearly spent because she was the strongest sprinter of the chasing six and yet was completely blown out of the water in the sprint to the line. Similarly, Australia's tactics were somewhat baffling, although clearly Sarah Roy is turning into more than a fast finisher, you would have thought she was not the engine that they would want to burn in a chasse-patate like that. I know that the silver medal will be claimed as vindication of their work, but everything from the selection controversy to the negative race tactics point to a fairly difficult picture at Cycling Australia. It was hard to see how most teams would find their way around trying to beat the Dutch superteam, admittedly, but placement riding is even more frustrating in single-day racing than it is in stage racing, and I'm not sure how the team can argue that they thought Garfoot not contributing to the chase was in any way a strategy for victory, at least from that selection, unless they thought Gillow, Spratt or the exhausted Roy could have won the sprint from the péloton, which seems fanciful.

Now, who will be favourites next year? If their years are anything like this one, then Annemiek and Anna VDB will obviously be candidates, along with Kasia, Ash Moolman-Pasio, Longo Borghini, but what of development for Cille and Nosková? How about PFP transitioning back to a heavier road calendar? Having won the Supergà nationals, can Cecchini survive the climbs? Will Amialiusik be able to return? Will Jolanda return to the road? Will a new climbing queen emerge? Will my endless protests be heard and Claudia Lichtenberg reverse her retirement decision in order to ride such a challenging World Championships so close to home?
 
Re:

Libertine Seguros said:
It's no secret that I'm a fan of Rossella Ratto, and I was happy to see that she was strong and taking those risks late on in such a long race; the fallout from the Estado de México collapse and that she's never settled at a team has been a real staller for her development

In an interview she blamed it on a recently diagnosed gluten allergy.

I hope it's true and her career gets back on track, but realistically I'm thinking it's more likely to be a case of what a former Lotto team doctor talked about last year (generically, not regarding her of course).

He said that quite a few riders convince themselves they're allergic to whatever the current "trendy" food allergen happens to be and the team doctors don't contradict them because, hey, whatever helps you be more confident that this is going to be your season.

Regarding the race in general, this year's Euros and Worlds, with the strength in depth of the dutch team and the fact that they played to those strengths (you'd think I wouldn't have to praise a team for doing something that basic, but it's surprisingly uncommon at national team level) both had the feeling of.....the winner is going to be whichever dutch rider is in the first break to go after the moment when others decide "That's enough. someone else chase this next one"

Remember the 2008 men's Worlds with Italy having 3 guys in the decisive break attacking out of it in turn a total of 8 times until one of the attacks wasn't chased? Ballan won simply because he won that particular roulette. Both the Euros and Worlds looked like that same situation just waiting to happen...and eventually happening

I'm in no way saying Blaak's win wasn't deserved. The opposite, I have no doubt the jersey is in good shoulders and will be honored for the next 12 months.

That said, I'm curious if the race would've gone any differently with Longo Borghini and especially Guarnier still in the race. The latter especially seems like the rider who would be in moves like Blaak's at the end.
 
Re:

RedheadDane said:
Quick question: Cille... is that Uttrup?

It's what the team calls her.

The alternative is trying to pronounce something danish which is....uhh....well...counterintuitive what with the introduction of vowels that don't seem to be in the spelling. There's a reason at Boels they call Dideriksen "Vicki"
 
Cille uses that name on some social media too. I'm not sure why Amalie becomes Vicki, because it's not a very difficult name. I've taken to using Cille because it's quicker than Cecilie, and I would typically call her Ludwig if going on surname, but RedheadDane uses Uttrup and is a Danish native-speaker.

A lot of transfer news around Worlds weekend, we've got some serious upheaval ready for next season.

First up, the two young Italian supertalents, Elena Pirrone (who won both the junior RR and ITT at Bergen along with the junior ITT at the Euros in Herning) and Letizia Paternoster (who took silver at the Euro ITT and RR bronze at both Herning and Bergen) have signed for Astana, which gives them two very talented young Italians alongside their two Latin American signings.

Following on from the discussion of Dideriksen and Cille above, more young Danish supertalents are on the move. We were already aware that Emma Norsgaard, 2016 national champion and barely 18 years old, has joined her compatriots at Cervélo-Bigla, but also Pernille Mathiesen, winner of both the RR and the ITT at the U23 European Championships in Herning, is on the move from Virtu to join Team Sunweb. The 20-year-old is a pretty major prospect and finished 14th in the elite TT at Bergen, ahead of some very established names such as Longo Borghini, Duyck and Worrack. Sunweb do have a large number of young riders coming through, also having Liane Lippert and Juliette Labous on the books, and have also managed to pick up junior talent Lorena Wiebes from under WM3's noses. They've also signed Ruth Winder, who albeit a few years older has been absolutely smashing the US domestic calendar and going very well on UHC's infrequent European Tours, so as long as she can adapt to the European calendar she will be well-served. And given how well Sunweb's last two forages into the North American teams for talent have gone - Kirchmann and Rivera - you could say look out world. The team have also lost Tayler Wiles, who has signed for Drops and will return to the European péloton as a result. United Healthcare have plugged the gap in their roster by signing Leah Thomas from Sho Air-Twenty20; she's been consistently up there in the TTs and has been very good throughout the year, capped by her GC podium in the Tour de l'Ardêche; the signing of Wiles by Drops is complemented by picking up Parkhotel Valkenburg's durable sprinter Eva Buurman and Molly Weaver, coming back from a serious injury but finding herself increasingly lost in the shuffle at the rapidly-improving Sunweb squad.

All three are essentially signings aimed at trying to cover the obvious loss that will be felt with the British team's main results-getter, Alice Barnes, moving on to join her sister at Canyon-SRAM. What with the massive step up made by Hannah this season along with the big-ticket signings of Alice, Niewiadoma, and also promising young German TT specialist/durable sprinter Lisa Klein, as well as PFP returning to a fuller road calendar, it is perhaps unsurprising that there's only so much space at Canyon and therefore, like with Boels last year, a couple of established talents are being lost in the shuffle. Barbara Guarischi is finding herself increasingly usurped with Barnes taking on the sprinting role, and so the Italian has sought pastures new, moving to Virtu. There are rumours of Brennauer also moving on, but that has yet to come to fruition.

Of course, the biggest ticket item of the last week has already been touched upon, which is Jolien d'Hoore moving from Wiggle to Orica; especially with prior sprint options like Sarah Roy developing into more rouleur types, the team really lacked a reliable sprint option, so the signing of Jolien points at two things - firstly, a commitment to strong results and shoring up one of the team's acknowledged deficits, and secondly, a partial return to the more international days of a few years ago, as the last couple of seasons have essentially been an all-Australian squad supplemented by Annemiek van Vleuten. It is another year of upheaval for Wiggle though, as losing d'Hoore will leave an enormous void in their results as well as a card to play; Elinor Barker is a talent, but she's the only signing the team has made, while losing d'Hoore to a main rival and Lichtenberg to retirement. On the plus side, they can safeguard results to some extent with securing an extension for Elisa Longo Borghini and Bronzini is considering prolonging her career another year once more, but will Elisa find herself outnumbered in the groups the same way Niewiadoma did this year or can the team make a big ticket signing to plug that gap?

Another interesting set of movers and shakers are FDJ. They have nudged their way forward in the standings this season, thanks mainly to results obtained by Fournier and co in the sprints, and Shara Gillow; having used the former Rabobank team as a source of their international talent last year, they've gone back to the same well again, taking two riders off of WM3's books, signing Lauren Kitchen to keep Gillow company, and also veteran domestique Moniek Tenniglo. The two signings are tempered by the loss of another experienced former Rabobank rider, Roxane Knetemann, who joins 18-year-old prospect Karlijn Swinkels in increasing the Dutch diaspora at Italy's Alé-Cipollini team, after the team extended Janneke Ensing's contract for obvious reasons - the former speed-skater has been one of the success stories of the season, easing into the role formerly filled by Małgorzata Jasińska at the team, being a frequent early attacker and secondary GC presence, and often being the one to light the blue touchpaper at major races.

The continued losses don't make good reading for WM3, however, with Niewiadoma, Kitchen and Tenniglo all leaving and only (at present) Stultiens joining the team, as well as being snubbed by Wiebes in favour of Sunweb. I thought a couple of ex-riders may find their way back to Vos' team now that they're no longer roadblocked by a dominant leadership-by-committee, but 'twas not the case; in addition to Knetemann moving on to Italy, Thalita de Jong, who left Rabo in frustration at not having sufficient freedom, has moved from Lares after just one year, but has elected to take lead at the Experza-Footlogix team (formerly Sport Vlaanderen-Etixx aka Team Druyts). The Belgian squad is increasing its international element, also signing young Pole Agnieszka Skalniak, falling down the priorities list at Astana after the success of Arlenis Sierra and the signing of the two young talents mentioned above.

There are a couple of rumours around for WM3 however; the most persistent one connects them to Dani King, although it's worth noting that Kirsten Wild is confirmed as leaving the Cylance team as well; the veteran Dutch sprinter would seem an ideal fit for the team, if they have the budget available.
 
Re:

RedheadDane said:
And... how does "Amalie Dideriksen" become "Vicki"? :confused:

No idea. No doubt some inside joke.

Libertine Seguros said:
Cille uses that name on some social media too. I'm not sure why Amalie becomes Vicki, because it's not a very difficult name. I've taken to using Cille because it's quicker than Cecilie, and I would typically call her Ludwig if going on surname, but RedheadDane uses Uttrup and is a Danish native-speaker.

Unless I'm mistaken, the 2nd from last surname is more commonly used in Denmark. From memory Kasper Klostergaard Larsen, Michael Mørkøv Christensen, same as in Spain. However, some people like to be treated differently for whatever reason, see Perdiguero for the ultimate example.

Libertine Seguros said:
have also managed to pick up junior talent Lorena Wiebes from under WM3's noses.

A sponsor investing in men's cycling as well is likely to leave a women's team with comparatively more "spare" money. I wonder if that's a factor in Sunweb snagging so many of the best young talents.

Libertine Seguros said:
They've also signed Ruth Winder, who albeit a few years older has been absolutely smashing the US domestic calendar and going very well on UHC's infrequent European Tours, so as long as she can adapt to the European calendar she will be well-served.

As with Sierra and Rivera last year, this is one signing I'm very eager to see how it turns out. If only Stephens followed suit...

Libertine Seguros said:
a partial return to the more international days of a few years ago, as the last couple of seasons have essentially been an all-Australian squad supplemented by Annemiek van Vleuten.

I assume this is linked to the team's relationship with Cycling Australia becoming more distant

As for WM3, I'd argue a sprinter like Wild might be less of what they need, and maybe more a climber. Vos can cover the sprints after all. The trouble being no great climbers appear to be available. Of course, they do need a 2nd road captain like Wild if they want an experienced rider at every calendar race, as the team is otherwise very green (no pun intended)
 
Well, yes, ideally they'd have somebody who is an established climber to help fill the gap in the results that will inevitably be caused by losing a rider of Kasia's level, but I was thinking more along the lines of simply getting somebody who will give a guaranteed stream of results so that it's not all on Marianne's shoulders. And with the team's only signing thus far having been Sabrina Stultiens, who has decent enough climbing ability but has been rather lost in the shuffle at Sunweb after a long-term injury and then the team's success this season with the likes of Brand and Rivera, and the other marquee riders potentially available in the market not being climbers - it's confirmed that Wild and Duyck are leaving their teams, but there are also extant rumours about Bastianelli, Brennauer and Jasińska - they may have to sacrifice their presence in the hillier races (unless Marianne can build her level back up in those kinds of profiles) in the pursuit of a more solid bank of results in the flat to rolling part of the calendar.
 
Re: Re:

GuyIncognito said:
Unless I'm mistaken, the 2nd from last surname is more commonly used in Denmark. From memory Kasper Klostergaard Larsen, Michael Mørkøv Christensen, same as in Spain. However, some people like to be treated differently for whatever reason, see Perdiguero for the ultimate example.

I think it's mostly a matter of "-sen names" being hella boring and forgetable, so if you want to make a name for yourself it might be smarter to use a more unusual name.
As for Uttrup; I don't actually know if it's a general thing as I haven't been able to watch enough races with her to notice a pattern, it was simply a matter of the commentators at referring to her as 'Uttrup'.