Tiesj Benoot thread

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“I felt very good for most part of the day. When we rode over the Gulpenerberg the second time I was on top five of the peloton at the top and also on the Kruisberg all was going well, but on the Eyserbosweg I lost all power and stood almost still. I left the race before the last lap. I had hoped for more, but this can’t be changed. We’ll see tomorrow if I race both Flèche Wallonne and Liège-Bastogne-Liège.”

Maybe that altitude camp wasn't the right choice...
 
Jul 13, 2016
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Valv.Piti said:
Why was he going on altitude camp anyways between Flanders and Amstel?....
Not sure. I think he wants to peak for Amstel and Liege, but as a Flemish guy he can't skip on Flanders. So he does altitude in between, but it doesn't work for Amstel apparently.
 
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Samamba said:
“I felt very good for most part of the day. When we rode over the Gulpenerberg the second time I was on top five of the peloton at the top and also on the Kruisberg all was going well, but on the Eyserbosweg I lost all power and stood almost still. I left the race before the last lap. I had hoped for more, but this can’t be changed. We’ll see tomorrow if I race both Flèche Wallonne and Liège-Bastogne-Liège.”

Maybe that altitude camp wasn't the right choice...
at Barbantse Pijl it didn't had a bad effect, maybe the distance played him a bad trick?
 
No, Benoot was already good at 250km+ races when he was a neo pro. He discovered there he had a big engine (it wasn't as prominent in less km races).

But the Amstel is a very peculiar race. Because there are so many short hills over 260km (35) that it can drain you by surprise. It's one of the reasons Valverde never won. A few times he was suddenly 'empty' on the Keuteberg especially. And now it happened to Benoot on the Eyserbosweg. *** happens.

FW and LBL are very different with far fewer and longer hills, so it isn't as 'draining' (hard, but different)
 
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Valv.Piti said:
Why was he going on altitude camp anyways between Flanders and Amstel?....
Last time he did a follow up altitude camp was just before the Tour last year (he did a longer one before the Dauphine and then a shorter one between the Dauphine and Tour). It worked so he tried it again.
 
Jul 13, 2016
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Dekker_Tifosi said:
Have the feeling both Benoot and Wellens peaked a bit early.
Wellens was strong in Amstel, I didn't expect more than 7th from him on the Mur. Don't think it has anything to do with peaking too early, just with not being good enough.

If Tiesj wants to decide if he's more of a cobbled rider or one for the Ardennes, he shouldn't ride them all like this in the same season. You could see he was already spent at the Amstel.
 
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Vasilis said:
So, Benoot has gone full climber now? Strong week from him
I've been saying for literally years, that he has a lot of potential for GC, but my comments on this forum were usually "lol'ed" away by others. To me this is no surprise at all. It was just a matter of him committing to it. In the past he already had some very good results (12th Dauphiné, 20th TDF... all without specific GC/climbing preperation). But ofcourse, 4th in Suisse is not the same as winning Utah for instance :eek:
 
Of course he has shown promising climbing signs before, I've seen him as an all-round talent since, well, basically his first pro year I guess, but I this is a little different. If you're 20th in the Tour, it basically means you can go in the breakaway for the last week to gain back time, but if you're 4th here, it means you actually have to stick with the best in the race. Maybe the best in this race wasn't that good, but you still have to race differently and he did well.

And he didn't just outclimb those two this week, since only 3 people finished in front of him (though some of that must be attributed to the TT's). Still, even matching these guys is impressive from him.
 
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Vasilis said:
Of course he has shown promising climbing signs before, I've seen him as an all-round talent since, well, basically his first pro year I guess, but I this is a little different. If you're 20th in the Tour, it basically means you can go in the breakaway for the last week to gain back time, but if you're 4th here, it means you actually have to stick with the best in the race. Maybe the best in this race wasn't that good, but you still have to race differently and he did well.

And he didn't just outclimb those two this week, since only 3 people finished in front of him (though some of that must be attributed to the TT's). Still, even matching these guys is impressive from him.
Being in the break and taking back 3 minutes, might gain you 2 or 3 spots in GC. It won't catapult you from spot 113 to 20. Not to mention, that being in a break, often has a negative effect on GC the following day/days. That said, i can't remember if he was ever in a break taking back time, in that TDF or Dauhiné.
 
I fail to understand how a rider as big and powerful as him can climb so well while simultaneously being s miserable tt’er. I know it’s a lot about position on the bike and aerodynamics but it’s very strange.
 
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Logic-is-your-friend said:
Vasilis said:
Of course he has shown promising climbing signs before, I've seen him as an all-round talent since, well, basically his first pro year I guess, but I this is a little different. If you're 20th in the Tour, it basically means you can go in the breakaway for the last week to gain back time, but if you're 4th here, it means you actually have to stick with the best in the race. Maybe the best in this race wasn't that good, but you still have to race differently and he did well.

And he didn't just outclimb those two this week, since only 3 people finished in front of him (though some of that must be attributed to the TT's). Still, even matching these guys is impressive from him.
Being in the break and taking back 3 minutes, might gain you 2 or 3 spots in GC. It won't catapult you from spot 113 to 20.
No, but he was never climbing with the sprinters anyway, he was always decent already.
 
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Bushman said:
I fail to understand how a rider as big and powerful as him can climb so well while simultaneously being s miserable tt’er. I know it’s a lot about position on the bike and aerodynamics but it’s very strange.
He isn't a gifted ITT'er, that's true, but calling him "miserable" might be overdoing it.
He was 33rd and 32nd in this Tour de Suisse. He was 17th in San Juan. He was 51st in Tirreno Adriatico.

But his TT results this year have been a lot better than for instance last year. I think he's also been working with Kevin De Weert (who's been training Campenaerts this year).

Vasilis said:
No, but he was never climbing with the sprinters anyway, he was always decent already.
That's what i meant. Finishing 20th in your first Tour, age 23, does show some potential, surely. Especially after riding a the classics and without any prep for GC.
 
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Bushman said:
I fail to understand how a rider as big and powerful as him can climb so well while simultaneously being s miserable tt’er. I know it’s a lot about position on the bike and aerodynamics but it’s very strange.
Hmm looking at his results he is a worse TT'er than I thought he was, but he's not that bad either.
 
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Logic-is-your-friend said:
Bushman said:
I fail to understand how a rider as big and powerful as him can climb so well while simultaneously being s miserable tt’er. I know it’s a lot about position on the bike and aerodynamics but it’s very strange.
He isn't a gifted ITT'er, that's true, but calling him "miserable" might be overdoing it.
He was 33rd and 32nd in this Tour de Suisse. He was 17th in San Juan. He was 51st in Tirreno Adriatico.

But his TT results this year have been a lot better than for instance last year. I think he's also been working with Kevin De Weert (who's been training Campenaerts this year).

Vasilis said:
No, but he was never climbing with the sprinters anyway, he was always decent already.
That's what i meant. Finishing 20th in your first Tour, age 23, does show some potential, surely. Especially after riding a the classics and without any prep for GC.
Come on now, his 17th place in San Juan is very unimpressive when looking at the field. Alaphillippe won the race in front of freaking Valerio Conti and Evenepoel riding his very first race for Quickstep. Take a look at some of the riders in front of him: Oscar Sevilla (lol), Consonni, Quintana, Connor Dunne, Mäder, Cattaneo and some random Russian guy.

His tt’s this week was actually decent but it’s weird that he is a rider who has to defend himself in tt’s instead of taking time on some of the lightweights.
 

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