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Todays idiot masters fattie doper

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Today's "winner", Luca Zanasca. Doping to finish 57th in a virtual race. How to suspend him? Take away his computer?

5.5 w/kg for 20min, according to him.

I'm sure the first 56 were clean as a whistle though!
 
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Today's "winner", Luca Zanasca. Doping to finish 57th in a virtual race. How to suspend him? Take away his computer?
Hugh...we both probably thought this thread was dead but another former "Continental racer" wannabe from before wanted to relive imagined past glory.
A guy I raced against in Masters was busted for 'roids and hormones. He "came clean" and got a short 6 month suspension for admitting he'd been doing it for 12 years because a "doctor told him his testosterone levels were low..."
Now he's got a prescription and is racing again. How? Don't know but some folks live in a world of their own.
 

5.5 w/kg for 20min, according to him.

I'm sure the first 56 were clean as a whistle though!
Wait! He's desperate enough to be on a Zwift "team". This gets funnier by the minute.
 
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Wait! He's desperate enough to be on a Zwift "team". This gets funnier by the minute.
I mean, the team is the Italian national team isn't it?

I went searching for info on that guy to see what kind of character he was. He's using an anabolic steroid but he looks like a typical waif-thin climber. And he's 40 (looks 55). And he's pretty full of himself. And he rode professionally around 2008. So I think he's just a typical hyper-competitive aging dude who's seeing his T drop due to age, over-exercise and starvation, and this is basically his TRT. He definitely didn't dope because of Zwift. Zwift is a symptom of his personality as much as doping is.

I think becoming an internet laughing stock and possibly losing his Assos gig is punishment enough for this sad little dude.
 
I mean, the team is the Italian national team isn't it?

I went searching for info on that guy to see what kind of character he was. He's using an anabolic steroid but he looks like a typical waif-thin climber. And he's 40 (looks 55). And he's pretty full of himself. And he rode professionally around 2008. So I think he's just a typical hyper-competitive aging dude who's seeing his T drop due to age, over-exercise and starvation, and this is basically his TRT. He definitely didn't dope because of Zwift. Zwift is a symptom of his personality as much as doping is.

I think becoming an internet laughing stock and possibly losing his Assos gig is punishment enough for this sad little dude.
A short professional career in your 20's likely means you were middle of the field Conti rider. In many cases you could be an upper category amateur and buy your pro license without a pro team's support or contract. You'd also escape most oversight on your, ahem, training regime. If you're good and passionate you'd likely ride longer but financially it makes no sense. If doesn't mean the rider wouldn't want to feel the winning feeling again.
 
In the 3rd world you can get a pro license fairly easy. What good it does is really subjective. You have it sure, but if you are looking for big, lucrative events to race in Bolivia, Costa Rica, Peru, or Botswana.. good luck and if history tells us anything, there are always quality racers outside the system.. So as shown in a recent YouTube series by a group of Northern California racers, they went to Tahiti , after all how hard could it be, and they got their aszs handed to them. Competition was crushing it.
In the first world, Italy for example, if you get a pro license and you try to use it, why? There is no such thing as an easy professional bike race anywhere and you can be a fake coffee shop pro , they are in all big cities but there is no such thing as a fake pro bike racer..this all goes to the gravel discussions.. You can live a gran fondo life, line up next to a pro racer because you both have a license, but make believe will be over in a few seconds. Swift all all the other fantasy cycling stuff is after all fantasy.. Because you can beat Cavendish in a video game does not translate to reality, same with people going to famous climbs and trying to best the times of a pro racer, it's not real. We all need to feel shame and pity for a clown that is so desperate for recognition that cheating on Zwift gets him wood and he is standing on a podium in his garage next to cardboard cutouts of Jasper Philipsen and Filippo Ganna..people have no dignity.. I eat breakfast each morning with my lifelike dolls of Valverde and Olaf Ludwig but I don't let other people see me, that would be ridiculous.
I hope people enjoy life and have the money to do so but if being a fake Zwift champion is your thing that's sad..can't wait to show up to a race and Wout actually waits for me at each little climb out of respect for my pro license..
 
Hugh...we both probably thought this thread was dead but another former "Continental racer" wannabe from before wanted to relive imagined past glory.
A guy I raced against in Masters was busted for 'roids and hormones. He "came clean" and got a short 6 month suspension for admitting he'd been doing it for 12 years because a "doctor told him his testosterone levels were low..."
Now he's got a prescription and is racing again. How? Don't know but some folks live in a world of their own.
That slap on the wrist showed him!
 
A short professional career in your 20's likely means you were middle of the field Conti rider. In many cases you could be an upper category amateur and buy your pro license without a pro team's support or contract. You'd also escape most oversight on your, ahem, training regime. If you're good and passionate you'd likely ride longer but financially it makes no sense. If doesn't mean the rider wouldn't want to feel the winning feeling again.
I actually recognised Zanasca's name, it rang a bell with me. I think it's probably because of this race on the rogue's gallery of the 2010 Italian domestic calendar, with people like Riccò, Sella, Chiarini, Baliani and Scarponi.

Back in the late 2000s the Italian domestic calendar was really strong and a couple of the Conti teams could afford to pay some OK salaries, it's part of why Przemysław Niemiec stayed with Miche for so long. CDC-Cavaliere were hardly big but they'd got some good results in the late 2000s with Daniele Callegarin and Miguel Ángel Rubiano.

It looks like they became Team Nippo in 2011 and brought in some guys like Luca Ascani (off a ban), Max Richeze (off a ban) and Fortunato Baliani so Zanasca became surplus to requirements and went to Team WIT for a couple of years. Odd that they'd let him go when he was one of their best results-getters in 2010 though.

Feels like he had something as a pro, but the financial crisis hurting a lot of that Italian calendar and the dwindling away of the Italian ProConti scene that sustained that strong domestic scene and he hadn't done enough - or what he had done was regarded as a bit too suspicious perhaps - to merit anybody at the ProConti level taking a chance on him, and he didn't do anything memorable enough in his stint with WIT to merit anybody giving him a contract at age 29 at the end of his time there. Maybe he'd have plugged away a bit longer had he come around earlier with more teams and options available in Italy at the time, as clearly he never lost the competitive feeling, as he crops up in the Swiss amateur scene for a while afterward.
 
With Photoshop and buying trophies and medals online can't you just create a fake awards ceremony at your house and tell people you won the TDF or come up with a name of a race Tour of the Parsley Patch in Northern Germany.. I know for a fact that if you said that you won a race in Romania or Bulgaria, rural Hungry.. only 20 people in total would know if you are lying or telling the truth and that includes, racers,organizers and spectators.. Trust me I was there.. I have met racers in Mexico that put out protection hay bales and traffic cones before the race,do the race and in their clammy shammy clean up after.. And then we drink a beer, met too many of both kinds of racers..kind that would mainline EPO to be the champion of the Wednesday office park crit and the other people who love racing of any kind and their ego is checked at the door..
 
I bet the performance enhancing drug abuse is about the same in Masters cycling as in adult hockey and baseball and other leagues where 45+ guys who never quite made it as pros gather to work out their mid life crises fueled by anti-aging drugs and what the guys at the local gym are taking. But only cycling tests old guys.
For sure. I mentioned working out for awhile in a very plush gym with well-heeled members using personal trainers. They made no attempt to conceal the testosterone patches the wore. All for appearance's sake as few were athletically inclined but the climate persists. Telltale sign: biceps and neck bigger than circumference of the head and beet-red complexion.
 
It looks like they became Team Nippo in 2011 and brought in some guys like Luca Ascani (off a ban), Max Richeze (off a ban) and Fortunato Baliani so Zanasca became surplus to requirements and went to Team WIT for a couple of years. Odd that they'd let him go when he was one of their best results-getters in 2010 though.
Looks like CDC-Cavaliere was more or less the 'acquired' part in the merger between them and Nippo in 2011, with Nippo sports director (and former yellow jersey wearer) Alberto Elli becoming the team manager of the merged team. Very few contracts seem to have been carried over to what looks like essentially a new team. I could also easily buy your suspicious argument about Zanasca. A crazy amount of conti riders got busted around that time.

As I began to really follow cycling outside of the grand tours around 2009-10, I'm quite nostalgic for that period. If you look past the frequent doping scandals, cycling felt like a much more healthy sport when all the big nations had flourishing 'national series'. It also helped give the Giro and Vuelta a more interesting flavour, with local teams actually being competitive in the GC quite often. It's a shame how both the Italian and Spanish scenes went almost extinct.
 
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In the 3rd world you can get a pro license fairly easy. What good it does is really subjective. You have it sure, but if you are looking for big, lucrative events to race in Bolivia, Costa Rica, Peru, or Botswana.. good luck and if history tells us anything, there are always quality racers outside the system.. So as shown in a recent YouTube series by a group of Northern California racers, they went to Tahiti , after all how hard could it be, and they got their aszs handed to them. Competition was crushing it.
In the first world, Italy for example, if you get a pro license and you try to use it, why? There is no such thing as an easy professional bike race anywhere and you can be a fake coffee shop pro , they are in all big cities but there is no such thing as a fake pro bike racer..this all goes to the gravel discussions.. You can live a gran fondo life, line up next to a pro racer because you both have a license, but make believe will be over in a few seconds. Swift all all the other fantasy cycling stuff is after all fantasy.. Because you can beat Cavendish in a video game does not translate to reality, same with people going to famous climbs and trying to best the times of a pro racer, it's not real. We all need to feel shame and pity for a clown that is so desperate for recognition that cheating on Zwift gets him wood and he is standing on a podium in his garage next to cardboard cutouts of Jasper Philipsen and Filippo Ganna..people have no dignity.. I eat breakfast each morning with my lifelike dolls of Valverde and Olaf Ludwig but I don't let other people see me, that would be ridiculous.
I hope people enjoy life and have the money to do so but if being a fake Zwift champion is your thing that's sad..can't wait to show up to a race and Wout actually waits for me at each little climb out of respect for my pro license..
The number of riders bailing on the combined field event in Valencia kinda says it all.
Regarding your 3rd world comparison: a collected US amateur team containing some buddies raced by invitation in several Central American countries. The retained impression they had was the "snapping" noise as they started the race; rolling over excess drugs dropped on the pavement. The Norcal guys probably found something similar in Tahiti.

Regarding the First World: still the province of retired pros who, if they don't plan to cheat and win they cheat and offer up their pack assistance to some MegaDouche that pays them to pull to victory. The retirees simply drop out ala' Valencia to avoid any possible testing. Testing? Bahahaaa.
 
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The number of riders bailing on the combined field event in Valencia kinda says it all.
Regarding your 3rd world comparison: a collected US amateur team containing some buddies raced by invitation in several Central American countries. The retained impression they had was the "snapping" noise as they started the race; rolling over excess drugs dropped on the pavement. The Norcal guys probably found something similar in Tahiti.

Regarding the First World: still the province of retired pros who, if they don't plan to cheat and win they cheat and offer up their pack assistance to some MegaDouche that pays them to pull to victory. The retirees simply drop out ala' Valencia to avoid any possible testing. Testing? Bahahaaa.
that story was so stupid. "Usually about half of the peloton finishes the race in Villena" but instead "52 of the 182 starters came through the finish line".

What does dropping out do anyway? I did a pro/am stage race one time where USADA was present and DNFing did not exempt you from the requirement to share your pee if your name was drawn out of the hat. (Also only the top few guys had their names "randomly" drawn anyway.)
 
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that story was so stupid. "Usually about half of the peloton finishes the race in Villena" but instead "52 of the 182 starters came through the finish line".

What does dropping out do anyway? I did a pro/am stage race one time where USADA was present and DNFing did not exempt you from the requirement to share your pee if your name was drawn out of the hat. (Also only the top few guys had their names "randomly" drawn anyway.)
They certainly can’t test them if a rider decides to ride off into the sunset instead returning to the finish area.
 
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They certainly can’t test them if a rider decides to ride off into the sunset instead returning to the finish area.
but if you have any authority to sanction a rider for failing a test, you can also sanction a rider for failing to appear for a test / refusing to give a sample, which AFAIU is the same as failing a test (unlike the OOC whereabouts rules).

In my case I had to stick around after the race to see if they drew my name, but of course they did not because no one would care if I doped to get 112th place anyway.
 
but if you have any authority to sanction a rider for failing a test, you can also sanction a rider for failing to appear for a test / refusing to give a sample, which AFAIU is the same as failing a test (unlike the OOC whereabouts rules).

In my case I had to stick around after the race to see if they drew my name, but of course they did not because no one would care if I doped to get 112th place anyway.
Didn’t realize the whereabouts rules were different for this or similar races. Good to know.
 
The number of riders bailing on the combined field event in Valencia kinda says it all.
Regarding your 3rd world comparison: a collected US amateur team containing some buddies raced by invitation in several Central American countries. The retained impression they had was the "snapping" noise as they started the race; rolling over excess drugs dropped on the pavement. The Norcal guys probably found something similar in Tahiti.

Regarding the First World: still the province of retired pros who, if they don't plan to cheat and win they cheat and offer up their pack assistance to some MegaDouche that pays them to pull to victory. The retirees simply drop out ala' Valencia to avoid any possible testing. Testing? Bahahaaa.
It's a thing that happens in NY,FL and California, the lure of the podium, the want to be recognized as special. You can buy almost anything in pharmacies in the 3rd world, and at this point EPO, CERA and half dozen other common things have almost how to classes online of how to administer substances for dramatic gains. Nothing new there.
But what is going on in your head, what deep character flaws exist when you are a chubby middle aged clod who is doping to win a gran condo or local crit or gravel event.. Gravel is a slow moving train wreck in the US. Divide and conquer is a thing and w lots of big races skipping involvement with USA Cycling, drug tests are an afterthought if thought of at all. Profoundly sad if kids and age graders are getting gassed to get results that mean literally nothing.
I watched some video of the Belgian Waffle Ride( BWR) done recently in Arizona and it was confirmation that everything is already out of control. Anyone still silly enough to believe amateur spirit or essence of gravel are high. The story in Valencia and others, people are acting like pros when nothing, absolutely zero is on the line.. many of the age graders are getting trophies and some getting $200 for the win and $50 bucks for3rd.
Talk about return on investment!! Entry, hotel, food, equipment, training, travel and gas, plus doping time and trouble and all for a chance at $200 smacks and a photo, a free beer? Sounds futile.
You would think that it's a 911 for the federations. Nobody should think that Valencia is a one off,..wonder what a pre or post race peepee test would look like at Leadville, or Unbound?
 
that story was so stupid. "Usually about half of the peloton finishes the race in Villena" but instead "52 of the 182 starters came through the finish line".

What does dropping out do anyway? I did a pro/am stage race one time where USADA was present and DNFing did not exempt you from the requirement to share your pee if your name was drawn out of the hat. (Also only the top few guys had their names "randomly" drawn anyway.)
The US only drew the finishers and any seriously known doper. If they couldn't find someone that could pursue a suspension but that never happened in the years I was involved. Nat Champs was the more "diligent" exception and they usually knew who they needed to test. Especially Masters racers because they whine a bit more about losing.
 
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