UCI Spitting their dummy.

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Benotti69 said:
well if you cant see how transparency cleans up the sport you're not trying. Weekly blood tests. Not difficult since most riders live in proximity to the south of Europe, Girona, Nice, Northern Italy and Tuscany. Values taken by and tested by an independent body and posted on a website. Paid for by teams.

the riders do not believe they are risking their lives by taking dope. If they did they wouldn't do it. They are happy to ***** about descents on a mountain in the Giro but not ***** about what they are being told to take by Docs and DSs
So you are talking about more testing.
I would describe transparency as something else, but fair enough.

Maybe the quote below will put into context the levels of risk some athletes are prepared to take as far as doping.

"Dr. Bob Goldman, author of Death in the Locker Room: Drugs and Sports. Goldman told the Associated Press in 2003 that, over the years, he has asked groups of world-class athletes if they would take a magic pill that would let them win every competition for five years but then kill them. Consistently, more than half the athletes have said they'd take the pill"

More testing might catch more dopers, but there will still be plenty willing to take the risk.
 
May 26, 2010
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andy1234 said:
So you are talking about more testing.
I would describe transparency as something else, but fair enough.

Maybe the quote below will put into context the levels of risk some athletes are prepared to take as far as doping.

"Dr. Bob Goldman, author of Death in the Locker Room: Drugs and Sports. Goldman told the Associated Press in 2003 that, over the years, he has asked groups of world-class athletes if they would take a magic pill that would let them win every competition for five years but then kill them. Consistently, more than half the athletes have said they'd take the pill"

More testing might catch more dopers, but there will still be plenty willing to take the risk.
I bet most of those who answered yes had not seen the side effects or experienced the death of another competitor.

But just because athletes are prepared to take dope does not mean they should be allowed because for every single 1 who wants to compete fairly the sport owes it to those to prevent or catch the cheaters.

As for those willing to take the risk currently. Look at Di Luca for example. 3 times caught and still riding. Hardly a deterrent! longer sentences for first time offense and no chances after that.
 
Jul 2, 2009
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Benotti69 said:
the riders do not believe they are risking their lives by taking dope. If they did they wouldn't do it.
What about those riders in the 90s who had to get up in the middle of the night to exercise to avoid having a heart attack?
 
Jul 6, 2010
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Mambo95 said:
What about those riders in the 90s who had to get up in the middle of the night to exercise to avoid having a heart attack?
'Nuff said... Welcome to the 21st century, it's all good...
 
Jul 2, 2009
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JMBeaushrimp said:
'Nuff said... Welcome to the 21st century, it's all good...
Has there been a fundamental change in human nature in the last 15 years then? (Apart from the internet making stupid people more opinionated)
 
JMBeaushrimp said:
I was being sarcastic...
LES ESSARTS, France (VN) ─ Well the UCI has done it once again.

On Saturday commissaries controlling bikes before the day’s time trial decided to check whether or not saddles were level (UCI rule 1.3.012 states that “the saddle support shall be horizontal”). This caught out almost every one of the 22 teams at this year’s Tour de France.

In fact over half of the Saxo Bank team had to change their saddle position minutes before the start. Team manager Bjarne Riis was livid.

“This is bull****,” he said. “I’ve never seen something like this before. Bull****.”

Quite frankly, he was right.

There was no warning from officials that they would be enforcing the largely ignored rule. And it’s ignored with good reason. There is no consistent way to measure the hundreds of different saddles that pros use. Those with a cutout or valley in the tail make determining whether it is level especially hard.

Team Radioshack’s Johan Bruyneel echoed Riis, directing his comments to the UCI WorldTour Manager, Philippe Chevallier.

“The whole season you’ve ruled like this (with last minute decisions and poor communication with the teams),” Bruyneel complained. “We spend thousands each year in the wind tunnel and today in front of the world’s press, at the most important race of the year, you do this!”

Chevallier replied curtly, “I won’t discuss this here.”
 
thehog said:
LES ESSARTS, France (VN) ─ Well the UCI has done it once again.

On Saturday commissaries controlling bikes before the day’s time trial decided to check whether or not saddles were level (UCI rule 1.3.012 states that “the saddle support shall be horizontal”). This caught out almost every one of the 22 teams at this year’s Tour de France.

In fact over half of the Saxo Bank team had to change their saddle position minutes before the start. Team manager Bjarne Riis was livid.

“This is bull****,” he said. “I’ve never seen something like this before. Bull****.”

Quite frankly, he was right.

There was no warning from officials that they would be enforcing the largely ignored rule. And it’s ignored with good reason. There is no consistent way to measure the hundreds of different saddles that pros use. Those with a cutout or valley in the tail make determining whether it is level especially hard.

Team Radioshack’s Johan Bruyneel echoed Riis, directing his comments to the UCI WorldTour Manager, Philippe Chevallier.

“The whole season you’ve ruled like this (with last minute decisions and poor communication with the teams),” Bruyneel complained. “We spend thousands each year in the wind tunnel and today in front of the world’s press, at the most important race of the year, you do this!”

Chevallier replied curtly, “I won’t discuss this here.”
Classic UCI sleight of hand.

You know something funny is going on. The UCI, in order to look like they are doing something, decides to count how many wheels are on each bidycle.

The official UCI rule says a bicycle must have two.

Dave.
 
Jul 6, 2010
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As I said in some earlier post - the UCI loves RULES, they just have a hard time with the rules...

Really? Horizontal seats are your biggest concern? How about a heads-up to the teams before they're warming up?

Another example of the pointless, and unending, stream of d*ouche-baggery from the UCI.
 
Mar 17, 2009
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thehog said:
LES ESSARTS, France (VN) ─ Well the UCI has done it once again.

On Saturday commissaries controlling bikes before the day’s time trial decided to check whether or not saddles were level (UCI rule 1.3.012 states that “the saddle support shall be horizontal”). This caught out almost every one of the 22 teams at this year’s Tour de France.

In fact over half of the Saxo Bank team had to change their saddle position minutes before the start. Team manager Bjarne Riis was livid.

“This is bull****,” he said. “I’ve never seen something like this before. Bull****.”

Quite frankly, he was right.

There was no warning from officials that they would be enforcing the largely ignored rule. And it’s ignored with good reason. There is no consistent way to measure the hundreds of different saddles that pros use. Those with a cutout or valley in the tail make determining whether it is level especially hard.

Team Radioshack’s Johan Bruyneel echoed Riis, directing his comments to the UCI WorldTour Manager, Philippe Chevallier.

“The whole season you’ve ruled like this (with last minute decisions and poor communication with the teams),” Bruyneel complained. “We spend thousands each year in the wind tunnel and today in front of the world’s press, at the most important race of the year, you do this!”

Chevallier replied curtly, “I won’t discuss this here.”
I never thought that I'd feel sympathy for Bruyneel but he is absolutely right in his assertions. How they have the nerve to fine them 200CHF is beyond me.
 
May 30, 2010
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ARD/ZDF coverage is a bit like this:

Cycling; A. Rider attacks on a mountain stage "Rider launches an attack, look at him go. We don´t want to have to talk about doping but when you see someone attack like that at the end of a stage...." etc etc.

Athletics; Usain Bolt finishes a 100m race 90m ahead of the second placed sprinter. "Look at Bolt go, an exception athlete miles ahead of the competition. Simply brilliant".

The problem with ARD/ZDF is their blanket doping accusations against every rider in the peleton, while they deny doping in every other sport. I wonder why they haven´t stopped covering the olympics yet.
 

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