US Start for Giro??? Can we think about the riders for once?

Jun 18, 2009
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Why would you subject the riders and teams to a cross ocean transfer for a couple of stages? Does this sound crazy to anyone else?

I can't imagine the logistics nightmare much less the stress on riders due to a 6 hour time change.

Just more of the big tours not being concerned with the rider's health/welfare in my opinion.
 
To be honest, I think that this would be much harder for those that have to pack up all the equipment and ship everything across the Atlantic. The riders can decide to make the next few stages as hard or as easy as they want based on the pace that they set. These unsung team members will have some much harder days without any relief in sight - and they won't even get some TV time out of it.
 
Mar 10, 2009
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Highlander said:
To be honest, I think that this would be much harder for those that have to pack up all the equipment and ship everything across the Atlantic. The riders can decide to make the next few stages as hard or as easy as they want based on the pace that they set. These unsung team members will have some much harder days without any relief in sight - and they won't even get some TV time out of it.
I live in DC and would love to be a true tifosi for a day if the Giro comes here here - but agree - this could be a nightmare for the riders.
 
Mar 11, 2009
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If they do this, the rest will follow.
Prepare for Tokyo, Sydney, Dubai and Bogota prologues.

La Paz would be awesome.
 
Mar 18, 2009
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I say bring it on. The Giro should start on a Tuesday, race three days in the U.S., and resume after a two day travel break on Sunday to begin its normal three weeks, making the race nearly four weeks long. The travel and the jet lag would just be an obstacle that has to be overcome, much like mountains or bad weather.

The U.S. race should go north and hit towns and neighborhoods settled by Italians.
 
Mar 18, 2009
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Race around the Mall in DC, then down to Peru for a stage in the Andes, then a short TT in Antarctica (I'm sure they can snow-plow a few kilometers), a stage in Australia, then India, Turkey and bang--home in Italy. Around the world in a week. Maximum publicity for the race, and I'm sure only a few riders would die.
 
Mar 11, 2009
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Wallace said:
Race around the Mall in DC, then down to Peru for a stage in the Andes, then a short TT in Antarctica (I'm sure they can snow-plow a few kilometers), a stage in Australia, then India, Turkey and bang--home in Italy. Around the world in a week. Maximum publicity for the race, and I'm sure only a few riders would die.
Just get someone with loads of money cycling crazy. Offer a prize pool of as little as 20 million with 8 million for the winner(s team). Most pros would be dying to participate.
 
Mar 10, 2009
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ak-zaaf said:
Just get someone with loads of money cycling crazy. Offer a prize pool of as little as 20 million with 8 million for the winner(s team). Most pros would be dying to participate.
What happened to that good old 'cyclists are slaves of the road' attitude ;)
 
Mar 11, 2009
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Bala Verde said:
What happened to that good old 'cyclists are slaves of the road' attitude ;)
I saw a 'cycling is the new golf' topic on another board.
I didn't even want to click it :)
 
Jun 27, 2009
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At least all the riders will have to travel. A rough equality of conditions. Maybe they can all ride in the same jet liner!
 
Jun 19, 2009
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richwagmn said:
Why would you subject the riders and teams to a cross ocean transfer for a couple of stages? Does this sound crazy to anyone else?
Only if they cross it on their bicycles.

Otherwise, I think cyclists can take pretty much anything you throw at them.

Actually, they could probably cross it on their bicycles too, with fat enough tires.
 
May 6, 2009
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BroDeal said:
I say bring it on. The Giro should start on a Tuesday, race three days in the U.S., and resume after a two day travel break on Sunday to begin its normal three weeks, making the race nearly four weeks long. The travel and the jet lag would just be an obstacle that has to be overcome, much like mountains or bad weather.

The U.S. race should go north and hit towns and neighborhoods settled by Italians.
New Jersey it is. I suppose Katusha would like a stage around Brighton Beach as well.
 
Mar 18, 2009
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craig1985 said:
New Jersey it is. I suppose Katusha would like a stage around Brighton Beach as well.
I'm not sure if the orange guidos can still be classed as Italian.





Not a Photoshop job either--unfortunately.
 
Jun 12, 2009
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So...if they start the Giro in Washington D.C., how is that a tour of Italy? It is somewhat interesting when the three major tours venture out of the national borders for a stage or two, but going all the way across the Atlantic sounds absolutely stupid. Also, I dare say there are fewer Tifosi in the US than in Italy. To make it worth while, they would really need to run 5-7 stages in the US and transfer during a standard rest day --aren't the 3 major tours required to stay within 21 total race days and no more than 2 rest days?
 
May 6, 2009
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Everytime I look at BroDeal's pics that he put up, I just want to punch those ****s in the face and tell them to 'HTFU'.
 
May 7, 2009
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**Uru** said:
So...if they start the Giro in Washington D.C., how is that a tour of Italy? It is somewhat interesting when the three major tours venture out of the national borders for a stage or two, but going all the way across the Atlantic sounds absolutely stupid. .........
+1. It also seems very wasteful, from at least an energy consumption point of view, to fly all that stuff & people across the Atlantic Ocean for a bike race. But no one seems to really care about that. It seems like a tacky gimmick to me.....
 
Jul 1, 2009
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I still give this a good chance of happening. There's some compelling strategic reasons.

ASO is aligned with the TOC which has moved into competition with the Giro's timing. TOC will be broadcast in Europe in late evening on Eurosport, so it will get some EU recognition. TOC guys have said they want to get bigger too, maybe 10 days, maybe 3 weeks eventually? Ultimately it could become a competition for the best riders between TOC and the Giro.

To most US sports fans, there's the TdF and that's it (and only LA rides in it). The Giro probably has low US recognition beyond avid cyclists, but a great product/route/competition (some think even better than TdF).

So it makes good sense for the Giro to counter and even preempt moves by the ASO TOC-TdF alliance, build some US recognition, and maintain their position in the global tour landscape. Otherwise they risk becoming a regional race with less value to sponsors and riders.

Hard on the riders? Start the last US stage at 10 AM, create a rest/xfer day, blend in a flat Italian stage starting at 1 or 2 PM (not the Mortirolo first day back), and arrange an all business/sleeper class charter - should work.

The 8 hr flight is probably equal to the time of the 500+ mile xfer this year from Amsterdam. My guess is elite athletes can handle it. The elite guys at least get some benefit too, name recognition in the biggest untapped cycling market. I agree, harder on the support staff, and broadcast entourage

Also if I'm RCS, I get a deal with ESPN for US TV distribution. Enough with this Versus, NBCU, Direct TV-Comcast fight. Let the TdF share the screen with freakin' Bull Riding! ESPN could put it on "2" during the day and replay at night. Maybe even show some big stages live on "1". What else are they broadcasting in May? Imagine: "Basso, he Could-Go-All-The-Way!" "There goes Garzelli! WhoooooP!" Get Boomer on a bike and maybe he can get off that Nutrisystem food.
 

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