Whatever happened to...?

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You mean, Contador would have won, surely.

But yes, I think if Dumoulin had just ignored Lopez and Carapaz playing silly games with each other in his slipstream, and put his head down either when Froome was behind and losing time, or ahead and gaining, the Giro was there for him.
How much of the 3 minutes were one being stronger and how much were tactical blundering we'll never know.
 
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What happened to Remco? I remember him being one of the sports biggest talents, but recently he has really disappointed me and last year he didnt he race. I assume his form was just too bad for DQS to race him in 2020? Anyways hope he will get it back in the near future.
He's the Luca Brecel of cycling. Showed early promise, but then faded a lot. They both have time on their side, so big things could still be in store.
 
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What happened to Remco? I remember him being one of the sports biggest talents, but recently he has really disappointed me and last year he didnt he race. I assume his form was just too bad for DQS to race him in 2020? Anyways hope he will get it back in the near future.
Don’t worry Remco mentioned in his documentary yesterday that he was just not ready yet but he will be back...
belgian tv will, of course, follow this comeback :cool:
 
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A few oldies, Roberto Lezaun, won his first ever race as a pro 1991 Ruta del Sol, was all downhill after that.

Heinrich Trumheller, a Russian/German, turned pro in 1992. Finished 6th in debut Tour of Switzerland a few weeks short of his 20th Birthday, including 2nd on a stage to King Kelly. Then won the German Road Race title a week later and had several other Top 10s in races in his first year as a pro. Touted as a future star, made the bad decision to join a French team and his career quickly went off the tracks.

Ivan Quaranta, Italian sprinter from early 2000s who beat Super Mario at the Giro more than once and was expected to take over from Cipo, but never happened and instead Petacchi took over the mantle.
 
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Oh, Ivan Quaranta. My favorite Quaranta moment was La Vuelta 2003. He was dropped about 1k into the opening TTT, on a slight bump in the road, and didn't make the time cut. Actually, I'm not even sure he finished the TTT. Kinda sad/kinda funny. He was not much of a climber.

Anyway, what happened to Jérôme Coppel? Talented time trialist who turned into a very handy GC rider. 13th in Le Tour, top-5/10 in Dauphiné and Paris-Nice, multiple winner of Etoile de Bessèges. 3rd at Worlds TT in 2015 and he was consistently great at the time trials in his final season of 2016, in which he retired halfway through. 30 years young. Was he hampered by injuries? I don't remember.
 
*** climbs tho, no way you gain massive time on Cervinia.
Could have attacked earlier like Gotti in 1997 at Saint Pantaleon, he also had a very strong team. The climbs before Cervinia were Tzecore and Saint Pantaleon, both tough climbs.

Tzecore was 16 km at %7.7 and Saint Pantaleon was 16.5 km at %7.17 from this:
 
Anyway, what happened to Jérôme Coppel? Talented time trialist who turned into a very handy GC rider. 13th in Le Tour, top-5/10 in Dauphiné and Paris-Nice, multiple winner of Etoile de Bessèges. 3rd at Worlds TT in 2015 and he was consistently great at the time trials in his final season of 2016, in which he retired halfway through. 30 years young. Was he hampered by injuries? I don't remember.
Kienböck's disease (breakdown of the lunate bone in the wrist that articulates with the radius ) according to his article in fr.wiki (although a Spanish source attrubutes in as much to psychological reasons as physical)


Moreno Moser???

Perhaps he was never going to be the equal of his uncle Francesco, but in 2012-13 it seemed like there was going to be another great in the family. At 21 he won Eschborn Frankfurt, Tour of Poland, and Laigueglia, all from late attacks, and came second in Montreal GP: he was 26th in the CQ rankings that year (Pogacar and Bernal were older before they hit the top 30, I suspect he is the youngest to do so).
The next year he won Strade Bianche, was second in Frankfurt, third in the TdF stage to Alpe d'Huez, top ten in San Sebastián.
But thereafter, the most occasional of glimpses of what had seemed probable: a couple of stage podiums in 2016 Giro, bronze in 2016 Euro TT, a second Laigueglia win (2018)
Then retired 5 months into a contract at Nippo Fantini, saying that he knew he wasn't good enough.
He is still only 30, younger than 64 of the riders in the recent Giro.
But given where he was at age 21/22, why has he not been one of the giants of the last ten years?
 
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Kienböck's disease (breakdown of the lunate bone in the wrist that articulates with the radius ) according to his article in fr.wiki


Moreno Moser???

Perhaps he was never going to be the equal of his uncle Francesco, but in 2012-13 it seemed like there was going to be another great in the family. At 21 he won Eschborn Frankfurt, Tour of Poland, and Laigueglia, all from late attacks, and came second in Montreal GP: he was 26th in the CQ rankings that year (Pogacar and Bernal were older before they hit the top 30, I suspect he is the youngest to do so).
The next year he won Strade Bianche, was second in Frankfurt, third in the TdF stage to Alpe d'Huez, top ten in San Sebastián.
But thereafter, the most occasional of glimpses of what had seemed probable: a couple of stage podiums in 2016 Giro, bronze in 2016 Euro TT, a second Laigueglia win (2018)
Then retired 5 months into a contract at Nippo Fantini, saying that he knew he wasn't good enough.
He is still only 30, younger than 64 of the riders in the recent Giro.
But given where he was at age 21/22, why has he not been one of the giants of the last ten years?
Dont' do this to me :(
 
Great thread (although it may sometimes be a crossover to the clinic).

Name that first popped up for me was Moreno Moser too. His sharp decline came so suddenly. But since he was already picked up in the posts above, I will add: Löfkvist and Kessiakoff. Would be great if someone has more insights on them.
 
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Heinrich Trumheller, a Russian/German, turned pro in 1992. Finished 6th in debut Tour of Switzerland a few weeks short of his 20th Birthday, including 2nd on a stage to King Kelly. Then won the German Road Race title a week later and had several other Top 10s in races in his first year as a pro. Touted as a future star, made the bad decision to join a French team and his career quickly went off the tracks.
Blames it on (EPO) doping that started when he started in the pro ranks. He also says that the French team was a poor decision but to quote him "I had one or two years in the good old times, then the aliens came."
 
Lövkvist was really good from the start but went downhill after he left FDJ. He decided to quit after two years with IAM. Kessiakoff was still really good when he stopped riding. He was mad at Astana because they sent him to races injured so he couldn't heal and get better and took longer to get over the injury. When his contract was up he didn't have recent results and so could not find another team.
 
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Blames it on (EPO) doping that started when he started in the pro ranks. He also says that the French team was a poor decision but to quote him "I had one or two years in the good old times, then the aliens came."

The original version of the article including English translation and an epilogue.

Indeed an interesting story I read some years ago, after I was trawling through old gc results.
 
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Lövkvist was part of that HTC squad that flattered to deceive. With the team's history, definitely if they had been a GC-targeted team rather than a sprint team they'd have attracted a lot more attention in another part of the forum than they did. Even allowing for the injuries to explain away Gerdemann, you've still got Peter Velits going from winning GT 47km flat TTs and finishing on the podium to complete anonymity and retirement aged 31; Matt Goss going from durable sprinter and potential classics man extraordinaire to retiring at 29 and barely being able to finish a race on the continental circuit (though we also know personal demons played a large part for him); and hell, even some of the people that did do well post-HTC like Boasson Hagen and van Garderen haven't quite hit the heights forecast for them based on their showings in Bob Stapleton's Misery Express.
 
Lövkvist was part of that HTC squad that flattered to deceive. With the team's history, definitely if they had been a GC-targeted team rather than a sprint team they'd have attracted a lot more attention in another part of the forum than they did. Even allowing for the injuries to explain away Gerdemann, you've still got Peter Velits going from winning GT 47km flat TTs and finishing on the podium to complete anonymity and retirement aged 31; Matt Goss going from durable sprinter and potential classics man extraordinaire to retiring at 29 and barely being able to finish a race on the continental circuit (though we also know personal demons played a large part for him); and hell, even some of the people that did do well post-HTC like Boasson Hagen and van Garderen haven't quite hit the heights forecast for them based on their showings in Bob Stapleton's Misery Express.
Wasn't Lövkvist rumored to have been over trained & raced by HTC and hence ended up with some kind of chronic exhaustion?
 
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