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Your best memory of Le Tour 1903-2009

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Anonymous

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Clemson Cycling said:
Oscar Pereiro dragging George Hincapie up the Pla D'Adet only to be blown by at the top by the great American

Lance Armstrong making sure Simeoni didn't win the stage because he "did not deserve to win a stage"

stupid2.jpg
 
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Anonymous

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Back on topic. Fignon's 1992 Stage 11 win. I remember just being in awe of his determination and resolve on that day. I can still picture him with his ponytail in the wind and tongue hanging out just hammering away.
 
Jun 28, 2009
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Hincapie has always been my favorite rider since I live here in Greenville and have met him on several occasions so that win honestly was one of my favorites. I understand that he is not an elite rider (probably in the top 10 of greatest American riders though) but always has been my favorite (so great in that sense). The Lance thing was more wit but quite memorable none the less.
 
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Anonymous

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Rasmussen's Time Trial...

Failing that Roche v Delgado - la plagne 87
but im sure ive said this is many many favourite moment threads...

Another one to be sent to GENERAL!
 
Mar 18, 2009
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apologies CC - whilst I wouldn't call Hincapie 'great' in the bigger scheme of things, I appreciate your reasons for regarding him as great.

Indurain's Luxembourg TT was possibly the greatest solo effort seen in the race - though I always enjoyed Mr 60%s fine bike toss in the Risneyland Paris TT
 
Too many to list. Probably reading about in the paper, then seeing (as there was no live TV then in the USA) Greg's 1986 win got things going.

We didn't get to see Roche live in 1987, and it was covered in too much of a narrative fashion. :(

The stage to Luz Ardiden in 1987 when Davis Phinney was in that long break and climbed as good as he ever had (pretty good for a sprinter, actually!), and that helped teammate Dag Otto Lauritzen win the day.

Of course Greg's 1989 win. That's still the top to me.

PDM dropping out of the 1991 Tour when it looked like they, and especially Erik Breukink, were going to seriously challenge Lemond. That whole year was memorable, for the way Greg faltered, and how unreal the whole race seemed.

Andy Hampsten's win on Alpe d'Huez in 1992.

Les Arcs 1996, simply because Mig had never cracked before like that, and when the attacks came, it was something astonishing to see.

Lance winning in 1999 was inspiring. Though in retrospect, I feel cheated.

Same with Tyler's stage win in 2003 at Bayonne.

Ullrich crashing in the final 2003 ITT, when at the moment he appeared to be gaining time on Lance.

Same sinking feeling afterwards with Floyd's magnificent win in Morzine in 2006. But when I turned on the TV that morning and saw that he was in a long solo break and maintaining his lead I couldn't believe my eyes. When Sastre, Frank Schleck, Rasmussen and Kloden wouldn't (or couldn't) help Periero chase, I thought Floyd had a chance. When he crested the Joux Plane and held the time gap, it took my breath away. Even in looking back it was amazing that he even tried it.

Sorry for such a long list! Lots of memories!
 
1- 2006 Floyd Landis escapade to Morzine. That was epic. I felt like I was witnessing a piece of history that repeats every 20-30 years. Those stage escapades are rare in modern cycling for some reasons. Pantani almost did it but he abandoned in 2000, so that was an unfinished business. I felt cheated afterward, but I still watch that stage as one of my favorites. Now I realized in this Forum that Chiappucci did it in 1992. I guess I did not watch that Tour.

2- Ulrich dropping Lance Armstrong in Plateau de Bonascre in 2003. I could not believe my eyes that something was wrong with Armstrong. It was fairly dramatic at that moment. When I watched the stage few times again afterwards I saw Lance "sunken eyes". I guess Ulrich missed an opportunity right there.

BTW: I did not like Lance "persecution" of Simeoni
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Anonymous

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Clemson Cycling said:
And there is nothing wrong with that. It was Lance being arrogant

There was plenty wrong with that. Only a fanboy with no perspective on what actually took place would make such a statement.....that or a Clemson grad.
 
Alpe d'Huez said:
Same sinking feeling afterwards with Floyd's magnificent win in Morzine in 2006. But when I turned on the TV that morning and saw that he was in a long solo break and maintaining his lead I couldn't believe my eyes. When Sastre, Frank Schleck, Rasmussen and Kloden wouldn't (or couldn't) help Periero chase, I thought Floyd had a chance. When he crested the Joux Plane and held the time gap, it took my breath away. Even in looking back it was amazing that he even tried it.
That was the most stunning Tour event since I've followed bike racing. I enjoyed the moment.... lets put it that way.
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Apr 9, 2009
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Lemond vs. Hinault battles in '86. Unfortunately, we didn't see two thirds of it on TV. Steve Bauer probably saved Greg's Tour that year.

Any of Sean Kelly's sprint wins.

At the time, Armstrong on Sestrieres.

As for Chiapucci's wins, just can't get excited about that Conconi-prepped guy.
 
Apr 8, 2009
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mickkk said:
If you look at LeMonds career, you see a steady improvement. He was racing against Fignon and Hinnault abd co. who were over the peak of their careers.

There were no impossible 10 minute gains over mountains, nothing spectacular, just steady chipping away.

Psychology played a huge part back then. Riders did not have radio comms, it was more a tactical game of cat and mouse.

I stand behind the statement that LeMond was clean.

I am an Aussie, I hate cheats, Ive studied doping for 20 years and believe me, if there was a shadow of doubt I would tell you.

The career of LeMond, when placed on a graph, represents a gentle natural "n" shape. If you overlay some of the more recent riders, you can see the difference.

In those days, amphetamines were the most commonly used performance enhancing drug. When used, they resulted in spectacular performances, not gradual improvements. Blood transfusions were used back then, as were IVs of various substances, however, LeMond was one of the first to be tested for abnormalities in his blood. Nothing was found in him. At the same time, abnormalities were being found in other cyclists using the same tests.

When LeMond was racing, there was hardly a cent in the sport. I cant find a motive for cheating. His personality is also very different from many other riders. He did not have the "win at all costs" mentality.

However, I do not know the man, so stand willing to be corrected should anyone have any facts to the contrary.

Not to be a smart **** about it, but I am qualified to comment on this topic. I am a member of the ASADA, WADA and USADA.

At present, we are faced with a number of criminal organisations that are putting all of their resources into developing new PEDs.

There is more money and less police attention in PEDs. Many who were producing MDMA, MDEA, MMDA etc are now concerntrating on producing PEDs.

The former USSR States, Netherlands, Sth Africa, NK and China are the major centres of research into these drugs.

If you want to know who is clean and who is dirty, look at Olympic records.

Doping is now a crime, once upon a time it was not. We now have chemical markers that are added to professionally manufactured drugs, that are only detectable if you have the right "key" to reveal them, as has been revealed recently.

Naturally it is a game of cat and mouse, we do not have the money and resources to win this battle at present. Consider all the billions of dollars that are involved in producing "recreational drugs" being switched to PEDs. There would not be 1% of this being spent on prevention and detection at present. One school of thought is that certain countries are encouraging research by criminals into these drugs, so that they may be bought out by the State at a future stage.

"Crooks" for want of a better word, are trawling through the scientific and medical literature from the 1600s to present to find new PEDs. Recently, a team of sham "Scientists" was discovered in Borneo of all places, looking at plants that may have Beta blocking properties. Pretty similar to how the western world is now exploiting Hoodia.

Everything can be found in nature if you look hard enough.

No country or organisation is willing to put the same amount, or more money into prevention and detection.

We are playing catch up and are generally 2-4 years behind the race.

LeMond was clean.

This is your 'best' memory of the Tour 1903-2009. How sad
 
Apr 8, 2009
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Any mountain stage that Merckx rode, where he just went to the front and gradually decimated the field.

Thats the way to win a GT.
 
Apr 8, 2009
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bianchigirl said:
1983 Pascal Simon takes the yellow jersey then crashes the next day. He struggles on through the Pyrenees and is finally forced to abandon in the Alpes. In 2001, as the race enters the Alpes, Pascal tells his brother Francois 'I had the jersey here but I had to leave it behind - will you go and find it for me?' At the end of the stage to Alpe d'Huez, Francois Simon is the Maillot Jaune and keeps the jersey for the next 2 stages.
I remember that so well. I think he broke a bone in his shoulder and managed to hold the jersey in the time trial from Fignon, only to get off the next day.
I felt every moment for him in the TT up Puy de Dome.

That and Merckx riding with a broken jaw defined for me how much value the yellow jersey has.
 
Mar 12, 2009
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does anyone else remember the long solo break by Eros Poli in '94 over Ventoux?? i still remember it vividly....its the stuff of dreams, made a huge impression on me as a kid.