2014 Giro heading to Ireland

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I am from US and Giro does not belong here. Giro does not belong in Ireland either. If UCI want race there create a one week Tour of Ireland and make the teams go there.
If I want to see a GT I will fly there.
 
Zam_Olyas said:
It will be the first foreign start for any Grand Tour since the implementation of a new UCI regulation prohibiting rest days on three-week Tours until the completion of at least seven days of racing
Sorry, I'm not sure I understand.
This means they will take a flight straight after the third stage and then race the fourth stage the day after?
 
element said:
You'd all change your tune if it was starting in your hometown! Can't wait for this, will be the first WT race I get to see.
In 2012 the Giro started close to me(40 km). It was a terrible decision! The Giro simply doesn't belong in Denmark, and Denmark has nothing to offer to the Giro. They only did it to increase the audience (It was sent for the first time on national (TV) :eek:

PS: I also think it was terrible that the Worlds was in Copenhagen in '11.
 
Nov 14, 2011
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I read that they wont be having a rest day between the third and fourth stages. Presumably just jumping on a few chartered flights from dublin to italy
 
Jun 4, 2011
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williamp78 said:
I read that they wont be having a rest day between the third and fourth stages. Presumably just jumping on a few chartered flights from dublin to italy
for the riders it won't be a problem, but it will be a major issue for all the organization material and veichles, team equipment and all the sponsor carousel.
Quite expensive to transport all those stuff by plane.
 
Jul 19, 2011
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williamp78 said:
I read that they wont be having a rest day between the third and fourth stages. Presumably just jumping on a few chartered flights from dublin to italy
I'd put money on a TTT on the first day in Italy. Not only does that mean the riders won't need to be racing in the morning the next day, but the teams can arrange for the time trial bikes to be waiting for the riders in Italy. Meanwhile it gives the racing bikes an extra day to arrive.
 
Sep 22, 2012
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Cult Classics said:
I'd put money on a TTT on the first day in Italy. Not only does that mean the riders won't need to be racing in the morning the next day, but the teams can arrange for the time trial bikes to be waiting for the riders in Italy. Meanwhile it gives the racing bikes an extra day to arrive.
Another reason to be disgusted by the move.
These kind of stupid decisions make me so angry.

And to those saying it is good decision because they get to see racing, you are just putting your own selfish desires above the good of the Giro and the sport.
 
I'm a bit taken aback by the negative reaction to this to be honest. I'd seen a stage finish of the Rás in Tramore when I was a kid, and I knew Seán Kelly grew up nearby (although I was too young to appreciate his achievements in his heyday), but the excitement of seeing the fittest people in the world fly past me on the quay in Waterford during that infamous 1998 Tour, on the same roads I walked up and down every day, was what really kickstarted my cycling fandom, and is something that'll stay with me for the rest of my life.

The Tour de France is the de facto World Cup/Champion's league of cycling (the World Championships and Olympics being a crapshoot) and as such such is bigger than just the nation of France, and can and has taken in trips to other countries without diluting its identity in any way. Similarly, I see the increasing number of Giro stages outside Italy as a positive sign of it being more than just an Italian event, and part of a return to greater parity with the Tour after a definite drop in prestige during the monobollock years.

Mad Elephant Man, I'll at least give you credit for consistency as you raised the same objections when it was announced that Yorkshire was getting the Tour start.

And who wants to ride in the rain and colder than already is in Italy?
Late May is generally the nicest time of the year in Ireland - people call it exam weather as schoolkids/students have to study for/do exams during what is often the only decent bit of sun all year. And if it did rain, so what? You won't melt, unless you're Jan Ullrich. No matter how bad it is it'll still be a hell of a lot warmer than last year's penultimate stage finish on the Stelvio.

Everybody wants to milk the Sky cow.
I'm not sure what point you're making here? Considering the state of the economy both sides of the border, there won't be much milk to be had.

I am from US and Giro does not belong here. Giro does not belong in Ireland either. If UCI want race there create a one week Tour of Ireland and make the teams go there.
The Rás is an 8 day stage race and has been run since the 50's. The Tour of Ireland (for a while the Nissan Classic - check out some clips on YouTube) was another 8 day stage race that started in the 50's but is no longer run. Neither is the same as having a Grand Tour come to town.
 
Dazed and Confused said:
Italy with the best cycling terrain in the world wants to find roads in Ireland. Everybody wants to milk the Sky cow.
You know if they had decided to start anywhere else but freekin Belfast, one might detect a bit of willful projecting on your part. However, given the history Northern Ireland has with Britain means that your assertion is grounded.

Then this is what La Gazzetta dello Sport had to say in today's paper:

"Once again La Gazzetta's race is unleashed from abroad, while it's not by chance that it will be an English speaking country that hosts the "Great Departure." It's not by chance because the world of cycling has expanded its horizons, and in recent years the sport's growth has largely taken place in countries that speak the Queen's tongue (the US, Australia, Great Britain, Ireland...)."

The article goes on to report that it was through the auspices of Darach McQuaid, Pat's brother, who raced in Coppi's time, and 5 million euro supplied by the local administration, that the improbable design has worked out. Improbable, because it's the most complicated Grand Tour start ever, given that the first two stages will be held in Belfast (capital of N. Ireland, which is part of Great Britain), while Monday 11 the stage takes off from Armagh and arrives in Dublin, the capital of the Republic of Ireland.

It would have been impossible, according to La Gazzetta, just fifteen years ago to unify the two antagonistic states because of the legal, cultural, religious and political dichotomies that have separated them through centuries of conflict. Great strides, however, have been made over recent years, again according to La Gazzetta, along the path of reconciliation and harmony, while the Giro intends to be a symbol of that progress and will be an occasion to emphasize the trend.

PS: As well as tapping into the Sky cash cow.

PSS: As an aside, in a second article in the same daily, an interview with Stephen Roche, who lives between Antibes and Majorca (lovely places!), the Irish ex-champion says his son Nicholas is strong and this year with Contador at Saxo Bank will have some nice satisfactions. Yet his other son, 14 year-old Alex, who has just started racing with a Nice based team - naturally on Carrera bikes - Roche claims is a phenomenon. "He's got the peddle stroke of athletes of talent. I'm sure he will win the Giro and Tour of 2024. You wanna bet?"

So there you have it, you heard it first hear.
 
Zam_Olyas said:
Me, i love murals so i love the belfast murals. I wish they could show that.
Ok, but I was being ironic of course. I mean Belfast usually isn't considered one of the top tourist attractions in Ireland, nor is it exactly synonomus with urban charm - no offense to any from the city on here.

I understand all the symbolic and business reasons for holding it there, personally, though, I'd much rather it have been in the area around Cork, if it must begin in Ireland.
 
Dec 28, 2011
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rhubroma said:
Ok, but I was being ironic of course. I mean Belfast usually isn't considered one of the top tourist attractions in Ireland, nor is it exactly synonomus with urban charm - no offense to any from the city on here.

I understand all the symbolic and business reasons for holding it there, personally, though, I'd much rather it have been in the area around Cork, if it must begin in Ireland.
I agree that the Cork area is more typically Irish and has bigger hills/more rugged backdrops, but Belfast itself has a unique character and is quite befitting of the dramatic ethos of the Giro. Hopefully the prologue takes in some of the murals etc. Also, the road stage will probably go up the Antrim Coast Road and into the Glens of Antrim, which will make for some spectacular scenery and racing.

And yes, me being glad about the Giro coming here might be a bit selfish, but only in the same way as fans who pray for rain before Paris Roubaix, or who complain when there aren't enough mountain top finishes in a GT.
 
rhubroma said:
As an aside, in a second article in the same daily, an interview with Stephen Roche, who lives between Antibes and Majorca (lovely places!), the Irish ex-champion says his son Nicholas is strong and this year with Contador at Saxo Bank will have some nice sadisfactions. Yet his other son, 14 year-old Alex, who has just started racing with a Nice based team - naturally on Carrera bikes - Roche claims is a phenomenon. "He's got the peddle stroke of athletes of talent. I'm sure he will win the Giro and Tour of 2024. You wanna bet?"

So there you have it, you heard it first hear.
Brave lad, by all accounts. As a 9 year old, gave a bone marrow transplant to the youngest of the three brothers, Florian, then 7, who had leukaemia (Nick Roche, 'Inside the Peloton', chapter 9).
 
rhubroma said:
Ok, but I was being ironic of course. I mean Belfast usually isn't considered one of the top tourist attractions in Ireland, nor is it exactly synonomus with urban charm - no offense to any from the city on here.

I understand all the symbolic and business reasons for holding it there, personally, though, I'd much rather it have been in the area around Cork, if it must begin in Ireland.
Fodor's listed Belfast as one of "The 21 places in the world to visit."

Most comments here seem to be 10-15 years out of date.

While I also know and like Cork more, it is Belfast who have come up with the cash, which is the only meaningful factor in determining stage locations.

Cavehill and Upper Springfield, and then a loop through the mountains of Mourne might not be selective among a field like the Giro, but will be a lot more scenic than many flatlands opening stages.
 
element said:
I agree that the Cork area is more typically Irish and has bigger hills/more rugged backdrops, but Belfast itself has a unique character and is quite befitting of the dramatic ethos of the Giro. Hopefully the prologue takes in some of the murals etc. Also, the road stage will probably go up the Antrim Coast Road and into the Glens of Antrim, which will make for some spectacular scenery and racing.

And yes, me being glad about the Giro coming here might be a bit selfish, but only in the same way as fans who pray for rain before Paris Roubaix, or who complain when there aren't enough mountain top finishes in a GT.
Well, then, I look forward to the Irish scenery, while your comment about Belfast being befitting of the drama and ethos of the Giro is certainly intriguing.

I'd still prefer Cork county, however, you raise some valid points and, given that I'm certain the Irish will embrace the Giro with exceptional spirit, the event should be memorable.
 
Armchair cyclist said:
Fodor's listed Belfast as one of "The 21 places in the world to visit."

Most comments here seem to be 10-15 years out of date.

While I also know and like Cork more, it is Belfast who have come up with the cash, which is the only meaningful factor in determining stage locations.

Cavehill and Upper Springfield, and then a loop through the mountains of Mourne might not be selective among a field like the Giro, but will be a lot more scenic than many flatlands opening stages.
Well, no offence, but my list of "21 places in the world to visit," if that be all, would not include Belfast. Although I'm sure you are correct about a certain perception being 10-15 years passé.

At any rate, the Giro will certainly afford an occasion to reformulate sensibilities toward Northern Ireland's capital.
 

Dr. Maserati

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Mad Elephant Man said:
Another reason to be disgusted by the move.
These kind of stupid decisions make me so angry.
Just to be clear - you have gotten angry about someone guessing what may happen?

Mad Elephant Man said:
And to those saying it is good decision because they get to see racing, you are just putting your own selfish desires above the good of the Giro and the sport.
Now you are saying that your selfish interests are better than other peoples selfish interests, fair enough.

The Giro organizers seem happy to accommodate the start - surely they are the ones to know what is best for their race. While I don't like the idea of a rest day so early in a GT that may not happen.
 
rhubroma said:
Well, no offence, but my list of "21 places in the world to visit," if that be all, would not include Belfast. Although I'm sure you are correct about a certain perception being 10-15 years passé.

At any rate, the Giro will certainly afford an occasion to reformulate sensibilities toward Northern Ireland's capital.
I take no offence: one of the biggest travel publishing companies in the world might consider that their opinion carries more weight than yours...

Frommers, another travel publisher, named it as one of 12 places to visit...
 
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