2020 World Championships - now confirmed for Imola, Italy.

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To be fair, I agree with that sentiment about the need for the race to be of a particular minimum length, although I'm not really sure why. It's likely partly to do with the idea that the World Championships are a higher status than your average everyday ITT as part of a stage race, and every other standalone ITT outside of championships (so obviously also the Olympics, the Continental championships and for some people the Commonwealth Games, Pan-Americans or similar) doesn't tend to draw the same level of field as the Worlds so it should be made a greater challenge. That's kind of received wisdom, but then you have some people who are great TTers who specialise over a middle-distance kind of route, like Adriano Malori used to, who would never stand a chance on a Worlds course because he would fade as distance tended upwards, so there is a case that much as the Worlds RR varies in profile so all kinds of different riders get a chance to win, so the Worlds TT should as otherwise it's something of an annual get together of specialists, in which case why not just have the Chrono des Nations at the elite level like in years gone by, and measure performance across a consistent course? Havinig it vary more in course would also make it harder for the TT mayflies that have been a problem in the womens' péloton in recent years too, with a group of veterans riding few road races and staying away from the elite calendar, basing the whole year around that high profile TT, and then disappearing and never showing the rainbow stripes in a major race all season (notwithstanding that there aren't that many ITTs in the women's WT stage race calendar at present).

The other factor in the received wisdom of the championships needing to be longer is probably to do with conflation with other types of races in the calendar where the length is a deciding factor for prestige; the most prestigious stage races are three weeks long, compared to one week or less for most of the rest of the major level stage races (sure, races like Portugal and Colombia are 11-15 days, but they don't have the same field). The most important one day races are the longest on the calendar, with the five monuments all being among the longest days' racing on the calendar. Milano-Sanremo pushes 300km, all the others bar Lombardia are in the 260km area, and Lombardia is 240-250km but with the climbs it has, takes the same kind of length of time. The World Championships RR is constantly up around 260km. Looking at last year's World Tour, the only other one-dayers that match up to that in distance are Amstel Gold and Gent-Wevelgem, which are among the most prestigious non-monument classics. The outlier is definitely Plouay, at 248km, as it is outside of the traditional 'classics season' and isn't a race which is considered as particularly specialised; for the most part other established single day classics on the WT calendar range from 180km to 220km and largely fall around the 200km area. A cursory glance through the Continental Tour one-dayers shows the majority falling in the 180km to 200km range, tending upward as race status increases, and Paris-Tours, perhaps the most prestigious and traditional non-WT classic, is the longest at just under 220km.

Plus, of course, cycling is first and foremost an endurance sport. However, while distance is a major factor in difficulty in road races, especially one day races, because of the pack nature of the sport, so wearing out and dropping the helpers is a crucial element of creating intrigue and inferring prestige, I guess that doesn't automatically mean that distance would have the same impact in a contre-le-montre as it does in road stages, where we've frequently seen distance be a factor in who contends races, such as Chloé Dygert hitting the wall completely at the 130km mark in the Worlds last year after looking like the strongest rider out there before that, and the way that Óscar Freire seldom won anything at the 150km mark, but came into his own the longer a race was, with his most prestigious victories coming in the longest and most arduous races of all, winning three world titles and three San Remos.
 
I thought Dumoulin favored long climbs since he's more of a diesel climber (like Froome)? Am I wrong? To me he is not really explosive on short climbs, is he?
In a one hill dragrace, no. But with many repeats, etc he gets a lot better. That's how he won the Eneco Tour. Getting 2nd or 3rd on the Flandrien stage and escaping on the Ardennes stage with Wellens.

The hills are probably some 4 and 5 minutes long, so it's not the sort of effort Mathieu van der Poel flies at. I think Dumoulin's 4th place in 2018 is telling that he has great one day potential cause he wasn't even in top form there.
 
I just think there is a different feeling to really long TT's. You usually know who is gonna win half an hour before the last rider finishes but it feels more epic if a rider has to fight completely on his own for well over an hour. It adds to the myth of the WC TT winner being this absolute endurance machine.

Now, people saying there should be a bigger variety in route lengths absolutely have a point as indeed different TT lengths favor different riders. I guess it's just that some of us have grown accustomed to the fact that the winner of a WC TT fits a certain profile we don't really see a need for change. I'd argue only having one specific type of time trial at the worlds every year isn't any more "nonsensical" than changing the criteria for "who is the best TT'er in the world" from season to season. At least the old system makes it clear what sort of discipline the TT worlds is.
 
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In a one hill dragrace, no. But with many repeats, etc he gets a lot better. That's how he won the Eneco Tour. Getting 2nd or 3rd on the Flandrien stage and escaping on the Ardennes stage with Wellens.

The hills are probably some 4 and 5 minutes long, so it's not the sort of effort Mathieu van der Poel flies at. I think Dumoulin's 4th place in 2018 is telling that he has great one day potential cause he wasn't even in top form there.
Okay, it makes sense. I did not pay attention to those results indeed, thanks for the explanation!

Do you think that those 4-5mn efforts are a bit too long for MVDP? To me he's a monster in short efforts. But 300km with such D+ might be a bit too long for him tho.
 
Okay, it makes sense. I did not pay attention to those results indeed, thanks for the explanation!

Do you think that those 4-5mn efforts are a bit too long for MVDP? To me he's a monster in short efforts. But 300km with such D+ might be a bit too long for him tho.
I think VdP might be fine if it were only a few hills like that and then big roads to the finish so he can be the best sprinter to survive, but the total accumulation of hills seems like too much to me.
 
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A bit of GB team speculation. Only six riders AFAIK

Adam Yates - Has the best chance of winning, and should be in good form coming out of the Tour

Simon Yates and Geraint Thomas - depends where they are in their prep for the Giro, and whether this fits in with that. But both could be very useful here

Tom Pidcock - They have to take him after his performance in the Baby Giro, and the course suits him well. He might not last the distance, but neither have most GB riders recently. Would be a great option to get in a break.

Hugh Carthy and Tao Hart - unlikely to be there at the sharp end, but both have shown they go the distance, and will be commited to the team

Froome - depends if he shows any form. Personally, I don't think he cares that much about the British team to play a domestique role

Ben Swift - Definitely has the legs, and has shown in the past that he climbs surprisingly well

James Knox - Could go well on this course, but has been quiet this year. Tirreno could be an indicator


Apart from those, I'm struggling to think of anyone?
 
A bit of GB team speculation. Only six riders AFAIK

Adam Yates - Has the best chance of winning, and should be in good form coming out of the Tour

Simon Yates and Geraint Thomas - depends where they are in their prep for the Giro, and whether this fits in with that. But both could be very useful here

Tom Pidcock - They have to take him after his performance in the Baby Giro, and the course suits him well. He might not last the distance, but neither have most GB riders recently. Would be a great option to get in a break.

Hugh Carthy and Tao Hart - unlikely to be there at the sharp end, but both have shown they go the distance, and will be commited to the team

Froome - depends if he shows any form. Personally, I don't think he cares that much about the British team to play a domestique role

Ben Swift - Definitely has the legs, and has shown in the past that he climbs surprisingly well

James Knox - Could go well on this course, but has been quiet this year. Tirreno could be an indicator
surely Thomas is a much better bet to be any good here?

I could see Carthy surprise.
 
surely Thomas is a much better bet to be any good here?

I could see Carthy surprise.

It's possible, but Thomas hasn't shown much this year, and there's the question of what stage he'll be at in his prep for the Giro. Physically and psychologically, the Worlds might not be at the right time.

But you're right about Carthy. I was a bit harsh on him. He could very well be up there at the end, depending how it's raced
 
I think VdP might be fine if it were only a few hills like that and then big roads to the finish so he can be the best sprinter to survive, but the total accumulation of hills seems like too much to me.
Kinda agree. Especially if we compare him to his long time rival.
I think he will be out of form after the Tour but I'd have rated WVA pretty high regarding his monster skills lately. The guy can literally do everything and both MSR and Strade show that he can deal with both hilly courses and length.
 
Dennis is a strong favorite for the ITT, especially considering his racing program.
I think Dennis
In a one hill dragrace, no. But with many repeats, etc he gets a lot better. That's how he won the Eneco Tour. Getting 2nd or 3rd on the Flandrien stage and escaping on the Ardennes stage with Wellens.

The hills are probably some 4 and 5 minutes long, so it's not the sort of effort Mathieu van der Poel flies at. I think Dumoulin's 4th place in 2018 is telling that he has great one day potential cause he wasn't even in top form there.

Tom can close a 45 seconds gap in the final 8 km. He can support the chase group that may perhaps include Roglic, WvA or MvDP
 
Australia's team: Matthews, Clarke, Durbridge, Howson, Porte, Haig, Lucas Hamilton, Hindley.
WE: Spratt, Brown, Chapman, Gillow, Kennedy, Neylan, Roy

ITT: Dennis, Durbridge
ITT WE: Brown

 
Doubt any TDF rider will be in the running for the world's ITT - Whether short or long, Dennis is the favorite with Ganna a strong chance.
If Sivakov makes his way through the TDF in one piece and only works in the last week he should go.

When a very good pro is able to nurse themselves through a GT without totally draining themselves they usually come out with fearsome form. See Tony Martin and Luis Leon Sanchez in 2012 after they broke their scaphoids in early crashes
 
A bit of GB team speculation. Only six riders AFAIK

Adam Yates - Has the best chance of winning, and should be in good form coming out of the Tour

Simon Yates and Geraint Thomas - depends where they are in their prep for the Giro, and whether this fits in with that. But both could be very useful here

Tom Pidcock - They have to take him after his performance in the Baby Giro, and the course suits him well. He might not last the distance, but neither have most GB riders recently. Would be a great option to get in a break.

Hugh Carthy and Tao Hart - unlikely to be there at the sharp end, but both have shown they go the distance, and will be commited to the team

Froome - depends if he shows any form. Personally, I don't think he cares that much about the British team to play a domestique role

Ben Swift - Definitely has the legs, and has shown in the past that he climbs surprisingly well

James Knox - Could go well on this course, but has been quiet this year. Tirreno could be an indicator


Apart from those, I'm struggling to think of anyone?
As far as I remember, Pidcock is racing the Nove Mesto MTB World Cups that weekend, in preparation for the MTB World Champs in Leogang.
 
Love the route. Possibly the best route I've seen in a WC in the 20 years I've followed cycling. They should easily make this a yearly one-day classic in the coming years if the WCRR becomes a great success!
 
Australia's team: Matthews, Clarke, Durbridge, Howson, Porte, Haig, Lucas Hamilton, Hindley.
WE: Spratt, Brown, Chapman, Gillow, Kennedy, Neylan, Roy

ITT: Dennis, Durbridge
ITT WE: Brown

What is Porte doing in the team ? He has no one day pedigree and is unproven over longer distances - Haig will be the leader.

Women's team is well balanced - Spratt is the leader but Kennedy and Chapman could do some damage.
 
Things aren't looking good for Italy, Ciccone out with covid, Formolo has a broke collarbone, same with Diego Rosa (who was 10th in Strade Bianche), Pozzovivo also had another crash and had to leave the Tour and Moscon is missing in action.
Nibali
Caruso
Bagioli
De Marchi
Ulissi
Bettiol
Conci
Masnada
Is probably the best team that they can send atm, Conti could also be on the team, but after that there aren't many guys left...
 
What is Porte doing in the team ? He has no one day pedigree and is unproven over longer distances - Haig will be the leader.

Women's team is well balanced - Spratt is the leader but Kennedy and Chapman could do some damage.
Sutherland, Hansen, Chris Hamilton or Haas are some better options but may not have put their hands up.
 
No Mads P.
He's decided that he'd rather not waste energy on a race he has no chance of winning, especially not with the spring fall classics coming up.
I'm honestly a bit of two minds about this; on one hand I understand that he'll have no way of repeating last year's win - course is simply too hilly for him - and he has the races he's aiming at coming up shortly, on the other hand... I just can't imagine the reigning World Champion not starting...
I suppose it would have been different if there had been a long flat run-in to the circuit, where he could help the team, or if it had been a normal year with the Cobbled Classics falling before the World Championship. Well... there isn't, and it isn't.
 

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