2020 World Championships - now confirmed for Imola, Italy.

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That was really a thump in the stomach.
Rode the climb in '98 (edit: ok, in fact the full climb to Col de la Forclaz) on a rented velo from Chamonix with holidays in Argentiéres (French side of the border) and a home trip via Lac d'Emosson ascent, I had to cancel biking next day. Plenty of hard climbs in the area.
Seven times the 'mini Forclaz' is surely a mountain version to be compared with Bogota '95.

Very sad for Martigny municipality, such a beautiful place and cultural stimulation such as e.g. the Gianadda museum.

I really hope UCI is able to find a similar route in Europe.

But what a pity for Martigny.
 
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To have a "similar" course you need a city which can feasibly have a climb in the 4km @ 10% ballpark - usable as a pass - immediately overlooking it. That obviously hugely limits the options even before you start saying (understandably, by the way, since most of the péloton will be there and you have the issue of decamping the whole circus to another continent at present) that we're restricted to Europe. You immediately exclude the Netherlands, most of Belgium, 3/4 of Germany, most of Poland, Denmark, Sweden, Finland, the Baltic States and the majority of the UK (notwithstanding that the UK is behind the curve in opening back up it would seem at present and also held the Worlds last year so would seem fanciful as an option). You're left with a very small selection of Belgian towns that could have a climb in anything like that kind of ballpark, especially as I would venture to suggest that La Roche-en-Ardenne is too small to viably host the Worlds. Out of 'traditional' cycling countries you're left with Spain, France, Italy, Switzerland and a couple of fanciful options in Luxembourg. Out of less traditional countries I guess there are potential options in places like Austria, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Slovenia and Portugal, but after that you're getting into peripheral cycling nations - though I guess Romania has held a race already this season. Austria is probably less likely as they held the Worlds just two years ago too.

Regardless of the likelihood of these places ponying up to host, from a "produces a reasonable facsimile of the Martigny course" the immediate thought is Turin, with the Basilica di Supergà climb at 4,9km @ 9,1% and easily manageable on a circuit of reasonable enough length to use as the Worlds (plus plenty of flat land around there to do a direct copy). The other immediate climb to spring to mind is of course Civiglio, 4,2km @ 9,7%, which we all know from Lombardia of course. Another good facsimile could be offered by Eibar, using the Azitain side of the Alto de Arrate (really the Alto de Usartza which is about a kilometre above the sanctuary, but in cycling parlance it's always named after the sanctuary); this is the side climbed in the ITT a couple of years ago, not the hormigón side climbed last year which would also fit from a gradients point of view but is a bit of a gimmick. Arrate via Azitain is 5km @ 9,6% with the main body of the climb being 4km @ 10,8%, so actually even tougher than Petite Forclaz.

It's probably no surprise to learn that País Vasco has a couple of other options for a course of similar fashion - Bermeo offers the classic Alto de Sollube - you could descend the traditional side, and climb the 4,2km @ 9,3% Almike side - Aupa Urdaibai!!! Elsewhere there's La Comella if you want to hold the Worlds in Andorra - 4,3km @ 8% and easily managing a circuit, though finding the flat first half of the course will be a chore! Mallorca offers Sobremunt, as far as the junction for Esporles, in the village of Es Verger. You could have a flat first half around Palma de Mallorca, although to make the circuit the right length you probably can't have the finish in the city, and the asphalt is not in a particularly good state there. I think I know a couple of forumites who'd be pleased with Cresta del Gallo being the key feature of a Worlds in Murcia, though I think it's not really tough enough to match up to the Martigny course.

In France, my first thought is of the Col du Lançon which would suit a circuit around either Arreau or Saint-Lary-Soulan and with a last 4km at just under 10%. Mende would be the other logical option, with Montée Laurent Jalabert. Aue in the former East Germany would be good, with the 3km @ 10,7% Teufelstein, with proper Peace race legacy too. Wisła could offer something with Przełęcz Kubalonka as well. A really good one would be Liechtenstein, actually - you could climb the Buchs side of Malbun as far as Triesenberg and then descend into Vaduz. That's at about 970m altitude, so about 5km up the ascent.

Of course, it'll be in Doha.
 
To have a "similar" course you need a city which can feasibly have a climb in the 4km @ 10% ballpark - usable as a pass - immediately overlooking it. That obviously hugely limits the options even before you start saying (understandably, by the way, since most of the

So it could be the climb where Nibali+Henao went down in Rio 16 but going up..
even if this was a possibility the covid situation here is a lot worse..

Of course, it'll be in Doha.
do it next year but not this, please!!
 
To have a "similar" course you need a city which can feasibly have a climb in the 4km @ 10% ballpark - usable as a pass - immediately overlooking it. That obviously hugely limits the options even before you start saying (understandably, by the way, since most of the péloton will be there and you have the issue of decamping the whole circus to another continent at present) that we're restricted to Europe. You immediately exclude the Netherlands, most of Belgium, 3/4 of Germany, most of Poland, Denmark, Sweden, Finland, the Baltic States and the majority of the UK (notwithstanding that the UK is behind the curve in opening back up it would seem at present and also held the Worlds last year so would seem fanciful as an option). You're left with a very small selection of Belgian towns that could have a climb in anything like that kind of ballpark, especially as I would venture to suggest that La Roche-en-Ardenne is too small to viably host the Worlds. Out of 'traditional' cycling countries you're left with Spain, France, Italy, Switzerland and a couple of fanciful options in Luxembourg. Out of less traditional countries I guess there are potential options in places like Austria, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Slovenia and Portugal, but after that you're getting into peripheral cycling nations - though I guess Romania has held a race already this season. Austria is probably less likely as they held the Worlds just two years ago too.

Regardless of the likelihood of these places ponying up to host, from a "produces a reasonable facsimile of the Martigny course" the immediate thought is Turin, with the Basilica di Supergà climb at 4,9km @ 9,1% and easily manageable on a circuit of reasonable enough length to use as the Worlds (plus plenty of flat land around there to do a direct copy). The other immediate climb to spring to mind is of course Civiglio, 4,2km @ 9,7%, which we all know from Lombardia of course. Another good facsimile could be offered by Eibar, using the Azitain side of the Alto de Arrate (really the Alto de Usartza which is about a kilometre above the sanctuary, but in cycling parlance it's always named after the sanctuary); this is the side climbed in the ITT a couple of years ago, not the hormigón side climbed last year which would also fit from a gradients point of view but is a bit of a gimmick. Arrate via Azitain is 5km @ 9,6% with the main body of the climb being 4km @ 10,8%, so actually even tougher than Petite Forclaz.

It's probably no surprise to learn that País Vasco has a couple of other options for a course of similar fashion - Bermeo offers the classic Alto de Sollube - you could descend the traditional side, and climb the 4,2km @ 9,3% Almike side - Aupa Urdaibai!!! Elsewhere there's La Comella if you want to hold the Worlds in Andorra - 4,3km @ 8% and easily managing a circuit, though finding the flat first half of the course will be a chore! Mallorca offers Sobremunt, as far as the junction for Esporles, in the village of Es Verger. You could have a flat first half around Palma de Mallorca, although to make the circuit the right length you probably can't have the finish in the city, and the asphalt is not in a particularly good state there. I think I know a couple of forumites who'd be pleased with Cresta del Gallo being the key feature of a Worlds in Murcia, though I think it's not really tough enough to match up to the Martigny course.

In France, my first thought is of the Col du Lançon which would suit a circuit around either Arreau or Saint-Lary-Soulan and with a last 4km at just under 10%. Mende would be the other logical option, with Montée Laurent Jalabert. Aue in the former East Germany would be good, with the 3km @ 10,7% Teufelstein, with proper Peace race legacy too. Wisła could offer something with Przełęcz Kubalonka as well. A really good one would be Liechtenstein, actually - you could climb the Buchs side of Malbun as far as Triesenberg and then descend into Vaduz. That's at about 970m altitude, so about 5km up the ascent.

Of course, it'll be in Doha.
As an option in Germany I'll add Heidelberg with the Königstuhl at 4.5 km @ 9.5 %. A 13 % ramp towards the top of the climb and you could ride by the castle. Politically extremely unlikely though. One of the options in northern Italy seem much more plausible.
 
Reactions: Zoetemelk-fan
To have a "similar" course you need a city which can feasibly have a climb in the 4km @ 10% ballpark - usable as a pass - immediately overlooking it. That obviously hugely limits the options even before you start saying (understandably, by the way, since most of the

So it could be the climb where Nibali+Henao went down in Rio 16 but going up..
even if this was a possibility the covid situation here is a lot worse..

Of course, it'll be in Doha.
do it next year but not this, please!!
I would agree, but who knows what the situation is like next year. Seems to me everyone is just playing for time, like things will be magically better next year.
 
According to La Gazzetta Imola is the favourite atm. 12 laps on this circuit wouldn't be bad:

I can see why you'd pick a motoracing circuit, from a logistic perspective it would be the easiest way, not a lot of roads to close and all the infrastructure is already there. Nürburgring or Sachsenring would also be great, but Germany only cares about the Tour...
 
I can see why you'd pick a motoracing circuit, from a logistic perspective it would be the easiest way, not a lot of roads to close and all the infrastructure is already there. Nürburgring or Sachsenring would also be great, but Germany only cares about the Tour...
on the Nürburgring there's the 24h race the same weekend (which basically is the most important event all year), so even if they wanted, there's no chance.
 
According to La Gazzetta Imola is the favourite atm. 12 laps on this circuit wouldn't be bad:

I can see why you'd pick a motoracing circuit, from a logistic perspective it would be the easiest way, not a lot of roads to close and all the infrastructure is already there. Nürburgring or Sachsenring would also be great, but Germany only cares about the Tour...
If this course goes forward it will be great for Alaphilippe or even WVA or MVDP.

The pure climbers won't be happy because the climb isn't hard enough to drop the puncheurs.
 
Atm it's mostly about lowballing the UCI, who still demands 4 to 5M for the right to organize the WC. Sounds pretty unrealistic on short notice. Still, better than normal when you have to pay more than for the GD of the Tour de France that gives you sooo much more exposure and international mainstream media coverage...
 
Reactions: Fus087 and Koronin
At this late point a closed circuit road course makes more sense than anything else to even attempt the Worlds. One big advantage is that being a closed circuit course they can keep fans away from teams very easily. Put all the teams in the pit area and infield and keep the fans on the outside of the track.
 
Reactions: Zoetemelk-fan
At this late point a closed circuit road course makes more sense than anything else to even attempt the Worlds. One big advantage is that being a closed circuit course they can keep fans away from teams very easily. Put all the teams in the pit area and infield and keep the fans on the outside of the track.
This, it's by far the easiest way to organize it.
The Sachsenring would be perfect, it was used for the German NC 2(?) years ago. Give me 28 laps on this one, it would be relentless and brutal, no time to recover.
 
Reactions: Koronin
I understand it's easier to organize. However I hate it. It's not road cycling to me.
This, it's by far the easiest way to organize it.
The Sachsenring would be perfect, it was used for the German NC 2(?) years ago. Give me 28 laps on this one, it would be relentless and brutal, no time to recover.
Wel, this profile does not apply for the modern 3.7k Sahsenring but displays the historic 8.7k TT course which still consists today (except start-finish straight), but as public roads.
Same can be said about the profile for the Imola stage, circuit identical to Giro 2015 stage 11 final three rounds passing Tre Monti and then about 80% of Autodromo Enzo é Dino Ferrari - i.e. the cycling course consists of about 25% race track vs. 75% public roads, roughly.

For not deceased race tracks I can only come up with Nürburgring Nordschleife speaking a fully closed track that will suit a WC, just as it did in '78 (except it by then included the now demolished 2k Zielstrecke, being 22.8k in total). But yes, unfortunately dates clashes with the ADAC 24 Stunden Rennen :disrelieved:
 
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If this course goes forward it will be great for Alaphilippe or even WVA or MVDP.

The pure climbers won't be happy because the climb isn't hard enough to drop the puncheurs.
I mean the climbers obviously wouldn't be happy but don't rule them out anyway. If they want a race behind closed doors they will probably start with the laps right away and if you ride that climb 15 times it's gonna hurt even though it's not super steep.

Thinking back to the giro, that climb also actually wasn't that easy. Freakin Contador attacked there in 2015, Zakarin won that year and Betancur almost won in 2018. Not exactly sprinters those guys.
 

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