Giro d'Italia 2021 Giro d'Italia, Stage 7: Notaresco – Termoli 181 km

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Click everything that could happen

  • Pellaud in the break

    Votes: 12 27.3%
  • Tagliani in the break

    Votes: 12 27.3%
  • Someone from Bardiani in the break

    Votes: 25 56.8%
  • Someone from Eolo in the break

    Votes: 23 52.3%
  • Nizzolo to finish second

    Votes: 30 68.2%
  • Someone to try and make a flyer on the ramp at the finish

    Votes: 15 34.1%
  • Whoever wins will not have won a stage before at this year's Giro

    Votes: 15 34.1%
  • ... and will be of a different nationality of the rest as well

    Votes: 7 15.9%
  • The winner will be decided by less than a bike length

    Votes: 19 43.2%
  • Someone will celebrate too early

    Votes: 5 11.4%

  • Total voters
    44
Btw, I can't be the only one who finds it pretty stupid that Oss decided not to take the lead in that late attack. The peleton was led by one single Lotto Soudal dom in front of Ewan and generally there were hardly any helpers left at the front. If the two had worked together that move very well might have worked but Oss decided to rather control the attack, riding for Sagan who so far hasn't even come close to winning a bunch sprint this giro.
 
In case anyone wants a bit more excitement after today's non exciting stage, they can watch Mathiue van der Poel and Tom Pidcock in a MTB race in half an hour, live @ 18:45. Women's race is half an hour earlier at 18:00.
Live stream:

 
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Btw, I can't be the only one who finds it pretty stupid that Oss decided not to take the lead in that late attack. The peleton was led by one single Lotto Soudal dom in front of Ewan and generally there were hardly any helpers left at the front. If the two had worked together that move very well might have worked but Oss decided to rather control the attack, riding for Sagan who so far hasn't even come close to winning a bunch sprint this giro.
At this point in his career, it seems that Oss has forgotten how to do anything that isn't riding for Sagan.
 
Does that apply to a mechanical, or just to a crash?

It would obviously make sense to not force a GC rider to try and keep up with a speeding sprint-finish peloton on a flat tire, but that doesn't mean the UCI agree...
It has been the rule since the dawn of time trialing (or for some time at least). Carthy was also given the same time as the peloton, even though he finished with three teammates who lost 2:21.
 
Reactions: JosefK
It has been the rule since the dawn of time trialing (or for some time at least). Carthy was also given the same time as the peloton, even though he finished with three teammates who lost 2:21.
Are you sure? I genuinely thought the rule only applied to a crash, certainly back when it was only in the final 1km where it applied. I'm nearly sure I've seen riders desperately riding to catch back up/minimise losses after late mechanical difficulty, whereas when it's a crash in the finale you usually see riders who aren't injured just roll to the line with no rush.
 
Are you sure? I genuinely thought the rule only applied to a crash, certainly back when it was only in the final 1km where it applied. I'm nearly sure I've seen riders desperately riding to catch back up/minimise losses after late mechanical difficulty, whereas when it's a crash in the finale you usually see riders who aren't injured just roll to the line with no rush.
I seem to recall multiple broadcasts where the announcer(s) cite the 3-km rule to include mechanicals as well as crashes . . . but that doesn't necessarily mean they're correct. Also, I imagine the race committee could rule whether a specific incident qualifies as a mechanical for purposes of the rule. For instance, a rider at the front of the peloton has his chain come off, but gets it back on and keeps pace with the back of the peloton. If something then happens that creates a gap between the front of the group and the group in which the rider finishes, does he get the same time as the front group (where he was riding when the chain came off)? I think the answer is "yes," but sometimes it's hard to know what the race committee is thinking.
 
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Are you sure? I genuinely thought the rule only applied to a crash, certainly back when it was only in the final 1km where it applied. I'm nearly sure I've seen riders desperately riding to catch back up/minimise losses after late mechanical difficulty, whereas when it's a crash in the finale you usually see riders who aren't injured just roll to the line with no rush.
UCI article 2.6.027:

In the case of a duly noted incident in the last three kilometres of a road race stage, the rider or riders affected shall be credited with the time of the rider or riders in whose company they were riding at the moment of the incident. His or their placing shall be determined by the order in which he or they actually cross the finishing line. Is considered as an incident, any event independent from the physical capacity of the rider (fall, mechanical problem, puncture) and his will of remaining with the riders in whose company he was riding at the moment of the incident. Riders affected by an incident are asked to make themselves known to a commissaire by rising their hand and report to a commissaire after the finish of the stage. If, as the result of a duly noted fall in the last three kilometres, a rider cannot cross the finishing line, he shall be placed last in the stage and credited with the time of the rider or riders in whose company he was riding at the time of the fall. This article shall not apply where the finish is at the top of a hill-climb. Decisions related to this article are taken independently by the commissaires’ panel.

So if they determine that a rider didn't actually want to be in the group he was in, when the incident occured, he would be credited with the time he actually finsihed in, which I guess is what happened with Carthy's teammates. Or since they didn't get a mechanical themselves, they would probably not get the same time as Carthy regardless.
 
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Thanks for the clarification, I had never actually read the rule.

So if they determine that a rider didn't actually want to be in the group he was in, when the incident occured, he would be credited with the time he actually finsihed in, which I guess is what happened with Carthy's teammates. Or since they didn't get a mechanical themselves, they would probably not get the same time as Carthy regardless.
I would assume the latter. Nothing in the rule states "and any teammates from the group who wait with him."

I would guess that the "will of arriving with the riders" part applies to that rare occasion where said rider would suffer a mechanical, recover, catch up to the group, and then overtake them and finish ahead. It would be foolish to then award that rider the same time as the others, but of course the only place you can realistically see that happening would be on a hill, which is exempt anyway.
 
Reactions: Samu Cuenca
He's aiming for the 3 GTs tbf so I'd say 13 is the latest he gets to. Wouldn't surprise me if he dropped out after the rest day though. Theres probably only Mondays stage and then stage 13 as possible victories left
Not only that, of the other days that he can't win, there's at least 6-7 grupetto days, plus a TT. Not only can he not win any of those, riding them probably actively hurts his chances of winning stages in the other GTs. He has 2 stage wins, so he's got what he came for.


He's aiming to win stages in all 3 GTs in the same year. Only 3 riders have ever done that, and of them, only 1 (Pierino Baffi, 1958) managed to finish all 3 as well.
 
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