Ackermann is Amazing!

Dettol

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Nov 10, 2010
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I was skeptical unti I read the article but yes he is. However I really doubt he is going to find any job that fully conforms to his values but I wish him luck anyway.

I think by his quote he realises cyclists are at the bottom rung of the ladder in a corrupt system so I doubt he'd name them.
 
Oct 16, 2010
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ricara said:
http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/ackermann-explains-reasons-of-retirement

According to this article, Ackerman was in the race-winning break at the Swiss National Road Championships and simply stopped and got off his bike. It was to protest the doping in cycling!

A great gesture. I hope that it has some impact. I wish he would write a book and name names. Or at least do the same in an interview.
Hold the phone. His allegations, if any, are quite implicit. To me, it seems more of a general accusation against the overly competetive climate in cycling, and pressure/expectations placed on the riders from outside. He's not quoted saying anything about doping explicitly.
 
euanli said:
He now working for Greenpeace according to Shane Stokes
Then he has a long way to go. Greenpeace has been inducted in the UN as a carbon trade propaganda tool. Intregrity is ancient history when it comes to Greenpeace. Most greens won't know. they think green, and blindly support Greenpeace. Blind devotion is quite te norm, in cycling and otherwise. It keeps people under control. Out with the bible, in with Armstrong and Greenpeace.

Best of luck with Ackermann. The Power seems to be strong inside of him, but he's been lured in by the Dark Side for now.
 
May 26, 2010
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Cloxxki said:
Then he has a long way to go. Greenpeace has been inducted in the UN as a carbon trade propaganda tool. Intregrity is ancient history when it comes to Greenpeace. Most greens won't know. they think green, and blindly support Greenpeace. Blind devotion is quite te norm, in cycling and otherwise. It keeps people under control. Out with the bible, in with Armstrong and Greenpeace.

Best of luck with Ackermann. The Power seems to be strong inside of him, but he's been lured in by the Dark Side for now.
give me Greenpeace over the joke of the UN anyday.
 
Jul 6, 2009
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ricara said:
http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/ackermann-explains-reasons-of-retirement

According to this article, Ackerman was in the race-winning break at the Swiss National Road Championships and simply stopped and got off his bike. It was to protest the doping in cycling!

A great gesture. I hope that it has some impact. I wish he would write a book and name names. Or at least do the same in an interview.
he should name names who raised you? good god what is wrong with people.:mad:
 
Jun 22, 2009
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cycling salvation

...very interesting article.

sadly, i think that ackermann's feelings and decision to leave the sport are quite common but rarely attract any attention. most walk away quietly feeling they've gone as far as they'd like to go in the sport without as visible a protest as ackermann.

i'd like to hear a bit more of what he has to say but i think i know what's happening anyway. the problem may very well be that he's well adjusted. he doesn't have the single-minded win at all costs approach that is required in this era. that's a very GOOD thing and will serve him well for many years to come tho. he talks about just enjoying riding his bike and living in that moment. it sounds like bike racing's loss, not silvere's.
 
Oct 18, 2010
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And off he hops into the much more rewarding and honest world of, bankers, stockmarkets, lawyers, politicians, TV and other news media, liars, cheaters and stealers etc. etc. etc.
Sorry to disagree with everyone, but it looks like someone who has clearly put his life and soul into competitive sport, only to run from it. I dont see a happy ending, for anyone that is short of the drive to change things, or an optimist at heart.
 
Jun 22, 2009
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Bertie said:
And off he hops into the much more rewarding and honest world of, bankers, stockmarkets, lawyers, politicians, TV and other news media, liars, cheaters and stealers etc. etc. etc.
Sorry to disagree with everyone, but it looks like someone who has clearly put his life and soul into competitive sport, only to run from it. I dont see a happy ending, for anyone that is short of the drive to change things, or an optimist at heart.
does that world include doctors, nurses, scientists, firefighters, teachers, police officers, honest people, etc etc? you need to get out of the clinic for awhile, the negativity is warping your brain.

it sounded to me like at some point he began measuring reward and accomplishment a little differently than others in the profession. he said he's had his mind made up for awhile and it was in no way impulsive. it sounds to me like he's matured and is ready for a different challenge. that's as much as i'll analyze his psyche from long distance.
 

Dettol

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Nov 10, 2010
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Office politics or if you'd like unethincal behaviour occurs in every industry including medicine, academia and the public sector just in varying degrees.

Sport is held up to a higher standard however where the hypocrisy ia painful.
 
Jun 22, 2009
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Dettol said:
Office politics or if you'd like unethincal behaviour occurs in every industry including medicine, academia and the public sector just in varying degrees.

Sport is held up to a higher standard however where the hypocrisy ia painful.
i think he has a problem with the unchecked aggression and greed that fuels drug taking and corruption. that's hardly the same as day to day office politics. i think some are giving the guy very little credit.
 
Oct 18, 2010
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does that world include doctors, nurses, scientists, firefighters, teachers, police officers, honest people, etc etc? you need to get out of the clinic for awhile, the negativity is warping your brain.

You miss the point LM&G. There is good and bad everywhere, there are challenges everywhere. Cycling is not fundamentally bad, but to turn away from something you love and have worked hard for is IMO an ill advised choice. He's 25, he wont get a chance to make these choices shortly, but at 25 to be as good as he's been you can conject that it has been his lifes work to get to this standard, and that is a shame to walk from. I hope he doesnt regret it.

As for "getting out of the clinic", I dont see any hostility or slander in my posting, perhaps you should reread yours.
 
sniper said:
Hold the phone. His allegations, if any, are quite implicit. To me, it seems more of a general accusation against the overly competetive climate in cycling, and pressure/expectations placed on the riders from outside. He's not quoted saying anything about doping explicitly.
Exactly. He just doesn't like the attitude you need to have for professional cycling, by always trying be better, losing weight and everything. Doping may be a part in that, but for me he's just a guy who isn't competitive enough to enjoy road racing. I know lots of guys who enjoy road cycling but don't want to join a club because they don't really see the point in doing everything to get first.

I also don't understand why someone who is quitting cycling is the next superhero, but that may be me. I even read that he has to publish lists of names. Do you really think, even if he quit because of doping (which he didn't, according to the article), that he has any interesting names to offer? He was an average continental guy...
 
Jun 22, 2009
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Bertie said:
does that world include doctors, nurses, scientists, firefighters, teachers, police officers, honest people, etc etc? you need to get out of the clinic for awhile, the negativity is warping your brain.

You miss the point LM&G. There is good and bad everywhere, there are challenges everywhere. Cycling is not fundamentally bad, but to turn away from something you love and have worked hard for is IMO an ill advised choice. He's 25, he wont get a chance to make these choices shortly, but at 25 to be as good as he's been you can conject that it has been his lifes work to get to this standard, and that is a shame to walk from. I hope he doesnt regret it.

As for "getting out of the clinic", I dont see any hostility or slander in my posting, perhaps you should reread yours.
hostility? slander? that's a stretch.

i have to admit, judging from your post count and join date it was probably a bad guess to assume the clinic had warped your brain. but you shouldn't be so sensitive, it warps everyone's view eventually, including mine. :D

just one last rhetorical question. do you think ackermann walked away because he is fragile, or because those around him are?
 
Oct 18, 2010
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I misunderstood that part of your post, so I apologize for my response. It didnt register that you meant "the clinic" as in this forum. I took it as "the clinic"... seeing my shrink or something (which I dont have one by the way).

As for his fragility, or those around him, I have no idea. Its a question that I think difficult to speculate on without knowing him. But here's what struck me...he said he had been waiting a year or so to be in a position of in the lead so he could quit and make a statement. If you are at peace with a decision you don't train your *** off for a year to be able to make a statement in such fashion. Far from it, it must have been almost a burning desire. This comment made me wonder if this is the decision of a mature man, and the problem is that at 25 he doesnt have many years to potentially regret the decision if it is the wrong one.
 

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