• The Cycling News forum is looking to add some volunteer moderators with Red Rick's recent retirement. If you're interested in helping keep our discussions on track, send a direct message to @SHaines here on the forum, or use the Contact Us form to message the Community Team.

    In the meanwhile, please use the Report option if you see a post that doesn't fit within the forum rules.

    Thanks!

AFLD's Pierre Bordry Comments on Doping at Tour

Page 4 - Get up to date with the latest news, scores & standings from the Cycling News Community.
Sep 25, 2009
7,527
1
0
Visit site
Bala Verde said:
********reviving an old thread ******

Has there been any follow up on the use of AICAR?
in a rare news letter yesterday, afld said nothing specific about aicar.

but there is some other encouraging news. the new lndd director Françoise Lasne mentioned that 4th generation epo (hematide and the biosimilars) is now detectable and that they are about to tackle the the autologous blood transfusion test.
 
Jul 30, 2009
1,735
0
0
Visit site
Can any of the chemists/sports scientists on the forum tell us what constitues a programme with AICAR?

I am not somewhere where I have access to Athens and anyway it is too long since I did any chemistry to want to try and write a synopsis of a journal article about it - although here is a link for anyone who does/can: http://www.aicar.co.uk/pages/publications.php

I see 5mg cost 80 bucks online. Is this an elite only thing or can anyone with a couple of grand lose 5kg in a month?

From my basic Googling I can't tell if you drop weight without losing muscle or if it actually converts fast-twitch to slow-twitch. Would be very interested to find out from someone better informed.
 
Jan 18, 2010
277
0
0
Visit site
5mg won't help

I'm not sure what would constitute a "program" but according to this study:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2706130/?tool=pubmed
they used 500mg/kg/day for four weeks in mice.

Not sure how that translates to humans, but I doubt 5mg is gonna do much
and at the price you mentioned it'd cost $24K for a month's treatment at 500mg/day.

From the same study it's not clear if AICAR converts muscle cell types. Using a different drug that activates a different protein, in combination with exercise they are able to convert muscle cell types, but they don't show any data for AICAR treatment.

However, they do show data that AICAR reduces % body fat without reducing total body mass.
 
Sep 25, 2009
7,527
1
0
Visit site
the avoidance science does not stay still.

at a press conference today afld's president mr. bordry explained how doping stayed undetectable (based on arrests in besançon september 2009)

in a nutshell, special networks of people provide pre-tested micro dosing protocols to individual athletes. multiple products are used and tested simultaneously.



i recall jaksche (or was it sinkewitz ?) who said just 300-500 IU of epo before bad and you can rest assured that 8 hours later there is nothing in your blood to detect. that was the cutting edge microdosing in 2006.

what will it be like in the 2010 tour by those who have many more euros than those poor ukrainian riders?

source: france24.com
 
Jul 19, 2009
949
0
0
Visit site
python said:
the avoidance science does not stay still.
at a press conference today afld's president mr. bordry explained how doping stayed undetectable (based on arrests in besançon september 2009)
More about it
http://www.20minutes.fr/article/396572/Sport-La-lutte-antidopage-adapte-ses-methodes.php said:
DOPAGE - Face aux nouvelles méthodes de dopage, l'AFLD fait jouer ses réseaux...
Huit cas d’infractions constatés chez les sportifs professionnels lors des contrôles en 2009. La moisson est maigre pour l’Agence française de lutte antidopage. Mais loin de croire que les dopés ont disparu, l’AFLD tente encore et toujours de s’adapter aux nouvelles pratiques. «A Besançon, sur le Tour de l’Avenir 2009, la gendarmerie a mis la main sur des kits de dopage, explique Pierre Bordry. La nouveauté est que ces kits étaient associés à un protocole particulier pour éviter un contrôle positif», explique Pierre Bordry.
Le professeur Michel Rieu, consultant scientifique de l’Agence, détaille: «Par un système de cures hors compétition et de micro-doses prises juste avant les épreuves, les produits dopants ne sont pas toujours détectables. De plus, il est possible de mélanger les substances afin que chacune se retrouve en très faible dose dans le corps, tout en conservant un effet combiné puissant.» Des techniques de pointe qui font dire au physiologiste que «ceux qui les mettent au point jouent dans la même court scientifique que nous».

La gendarmerie et Interpol


Une chose est sûre, ce ne sont pas des jeunes de 20 ans qui ont mis au point ces méthodes. «Il y a derrière des réseaux extrêmement puissants qui relèvent de la grande criminalité», assure Michel Rieu. Et ceux-ci «vont bien au-delà de l’affaire de Besançon. C'est quelque chose de plus vaste qui s'est perfectionné par rapport au passé parce que les enjeux financiers sont importants», s’inquiète Pierre Bordry. C’est pour lutter contre ces «réseaux» que l’AFLD a signé une «convention d’échange d’informations» avec la gendarmerie.
Cette collaboration permettra notamment d’améliorer le ciblage des contrôles. «Il ne faut pas stigmatiser l’ensemble des coureurs, insiste Pierre Bordry. En recoupant les informations, on peut en contrôler certains en priorité avec une plus grande efficacité.» Et s’ils ne sont pas sur le territoire français, l’AFLD peut toujours faire appel à ses réseaux. «Nous avons de bons contacts avec les agences de lutte anti-dopage des autres pays, poursuit Bordry. Récemment, l’Agence mondiale antidopage s’est aussi rapprochée des services d’Interpol.» Après la traque des molécules, la lutte antidopage part donc à la chasse aux gangsters.

Matthieu Payen