Andre Cardoso positive for EPO

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What's up with this? Why does it take so long to test the "B" sample and proceed with a CAS hearing? It seems like it was ages ago that the announcement was made of the positive test. Any idea if it was micro-doses or therapeutic amounts of rEPO that were detected in the samples? Also, any idea if his ABP was flagged and consequently he was target tested? (we never seem to get any of the good details on these doping cases anymore).

This would be a big one, right? Maybe career ending? I'm assuming a nasty 4 yr ban unless there's evidence presented to support a tainted supplement, spiked water bottle, contaminated IV drip, etc. Lol.
 
The phrasing in the article is odd. I had assumed that an EPO test gave a binary present/not present result, but this sounds like there was some kind of ambiguity which sounds more like the kind of thing that can arise in a blood passport case or in a test for substances where the quantity rather than presence of a substance is at issue.
 
Re:

Zinoviev Letter said:
The phrasing in the article is odd. I had assumed that an EPO test gave a binary present/not present result, but this sounds like there was some kind of ambiguity which sounds more like the kind of thing that can arise in a blood passport case or in a test for substances where the quantity rather than presence of a substance is at issue.
An EPO test results in bands of different shades.

Here's what it looks like

The band on the left is a negative test. The other two bands are positives. Cardoso's test apparently was somewhere in between.
 
Re: Re:

GuyIncognito said:
Zinoviev Letter said:
The phrasing in the article is odd. I had assumed that an EPO test gave a binary present/not present result, but this sounds like there was some kind of ambiguity which sounds more like the kind of thing that can arise in a blood passport case or in a test for substances where the quantity rather than presence of a substance is at issue.
An EPO test results in bands of different shades.

Here's what it looks like

The band on the left is a negative test. The other two bands are positives. Cardoso's test apparently was somewhere in between.
Thanks for that.
 
Re: Re:

iosonofuturista said:
LaFlorecita said:
Case will now go to CAS as the Portuguese cycling federation still demand a ban.
The Portuguese newspaper article makes no mention to the Portuguese federation.

Its the CADS and LADS http://www.uci.ch/clean-sport/anti-doping/ both from the UCI itself who are requesting the suspension to be maintained.
Sorry about that, I hadn't seen those abbrevations before so assumed they were Portuguese.
 
It is, but simultaneously it's quite convenient timing that he elects to give up on the appeal process right now. Either the Froome decision has highlighted to him that his only hope is fighting with enough money to take it to the system, money that he doesn't have, or he has been considering this for a while but the public reaction to the Froome case and its serious implications left him in the position where he could back down and still save face, as the little guy trying to fight his corner in the face of a machine that is being perceived as one rule for the rich and one for the poor.
 
This exact situation is described by Vaughters and Ross Tucker last few days. It won't have anything to do with the size of Cardoso's wallet if he gets off or not on this, as it's a lab and WADA review process not legal defence process required. If the lab says the B sample ATFd for EPO but the A sample is already an AAF for EPO, there's not much lawyers can do unless they prove the ATF and AAF lab process is flawed and there is no EPO in the samples. You can't fight good science with good lawyers on this in my opinion. I guess they could fight the rules that an AAF + ATF shouldn't be considered an ADRV, but that would be fighting the rules with something else, not the science, so unlikely.
 
I can't see how he could ever have fought this legally. His A sample will always have confirmed recombinant EPO in it. The B Sample ATF'd which means it has it too, but is not leaning enough into what was seen in the A sample and although doesn't happen often, he's certainly not the first this has happened to. I don't think if Froome had an AAF and ATF, even his money couldn't overturn WADA. That would need expert witnesses to basically say the EPO test not only doesn;t work, but can find recombinant EPO that isn't there as a false positive? Seems highly unlikely that could ever be fought legally to me?
 

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