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Best excuse or denial for doping!

Page 3 - Get up to date with the latest news, scores & standings from the Cycling News Community.
Aug 8, 2013
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dieter baumann

claimed his father was spiking his toothpaste.. I think it was nandrolone

Fatima Yvelain

got busted after inadvertently running through a puddle of water contaminated with epo
 
No Evidence!

The variations are countless, but here's a 2013 double-winner.

There's no evidence to suggest that it's [Jamaican Track and Field positives] the tip of the iceberg."

And then this golden oldie

Our athletes, as confirmed by the IAAF, were the most tested in the world of athletics

http://www.bbc.com/sport/0/athletics/24900565

Only to be found out later that JADCO was testing so their athletes would never test positive outside the country!!
 
"I forgot" "The Internet Lied"

Asafa Powell:
-"I forgot the names of the supplements"
He failed to name six of the nine supplements to doping-control officials on his declaration form before the National Championships last year.

-"I found no mention of banned substances in the supplement"

-"My massage therapist who used to work for Anthony Galea told me to use them."

-My fault here … is not cheating but instead not being more vigilant.

So as long as you don't get caught, it's on.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news...controversial-toronto-clinic/article13254812/
 
Not quite doping, but this is too good not to post:

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Drunken-driving charges against an upstate New York woman have been dismissed based on an unusual defense: Her body is a brewery.

The woman was arrested while driving with a blood-alcohol level more than four times the legal limit. She then discovered she has a rare condition called "auto-brewery syndrome," in which her digestive system converts ordinary food into alcohol, her lawyer Joseph Marusak said in interviews this week.

A town judge in the Buffalo suburb of Hamburg dismissed the drunken-driving charges this month after Marusak presented a doctor's research showing the woman had the previously undiagnosed condition in which high levels of yeast in her intestines fermented high-carbohydrate foods into alcohol.

http://www.sfgate.com/news/texas/article/Woman-beats-DUI-rap-with-claim-her-body-brews-6728499.php

Other individuals have beaten DUI charges, though the law apparently generally is you have to be unaware of having the condition to get off. Because if you’re aware of it, you know you’re drunk. The woman in this case, though, claimed she wasn’t “even tipsy”, despite a blood alcohol level of 0.33%. So possibly her body has some protective adaptations.

There surely must be an auto-EPO syndrome out there, in which your HT goes up to 60 because of weird metabolism. Actually, there are genes known to do that in mice.
 
Oct 10, 2015
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I was talking with some people about that DUI story yesterday. It is odd, but interesting.

Merckx index said:
There surely must be an auto-EPO syndrome out there, in which your HT goes up to 60 because of weird metabolism. Actually, there are genes known to do that in mice.
A quick Google search of "Naturally high haematocrit," and the first link that popped up was a Clinic thread from 2009.

Naturally high hematocrit levels
http://forum.cyclingnews.com/viewtopic.php?t=4475

With one very interesting post on the first page.
http://forum.cyclingnews.com/viewtopic.php?p=108462#p108462
Alexzulle said:
There is a genetic blood condition called polycythemia which basically results in massive hct values throughout life. My dad had it, and basically had a crit of between 55-65 his entire life. While it explained alot of his personal physiology (collegiate track star with minimal training, unexplained ability to work multiple 22 hour days in med school and residency) it comes with a rather sad side effect of extremely high risk for AML leukemia, which killed him in about a week at the age of 60.

I didn't actually know this until he was in the hospital and the doctor came in with the results of a blood test and when he should have been anemic (low hct) due to the leukemia he had an hct of 57. He then said he had a high hct his whole life.

Finding that out explained alot, like how I (27 year old cat III) was not able to drop a 60 year old man 2 weeks before he died when he had only been cycling for about 2 years.

So yes, it is entirely possible to have huge crits naturally, however there are serious consequences to this 'advantage'.

edit. I got curious about this recently, as I am pretty competitive without serious training, and while i'm not nearly at his level I have a natural crit of around 49.


Another interesting post from that same thread
elapid said:
Primary polycythemia results in hematocrits in excess of 55%. My father's maximum hematocrit is around 65% and he is on blood thinners and is bled every 2-4 weeks with the aim to maintain a hematocrit around the 48-50% mark.
 
Aug 15, 2012
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Merckx index said:
There surely must be an auto-EPO syndrome out there, in which your HT goes up to 60 because of weird metabolism. Actually, there are genes known to do that in mice.

Some Scandinavians have a distinct genetic advantage over everyone else. See the following vintage paper;

Truncated erythropoietin receptor causes dominantly inherited benign human erythrocytosis
(translation: some people carry a mutant EPO gene that results in naturally high hematocrit levels)
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC46538/pdf/pnas01462-0175.pdf

From the text:
"The clinical condition is so mild that many affected individuals are not themselves aware of any abnormality, nor do they have any sense of illness. The clinical and laboratory findings based on the study of 25 affected and 72 unaffected family members can be summarized as follows (15). Hb is remarkably high: mean male value, 204 g/liter; range, 183-231 g/liter (normal: mean, 154; range, 136-174); mean female value, 191 g/liter; range, 177-200 g/liter (normal: mean, 138; range, 124-153)."

"The proband, a 53-year-old male, whose Hb level has been 200 g/liter or greater since childhood (last
measurement, 236 g/liter), has been one of the best cross country skiers in the world, having won three Olympic gold medals and two world championships."

The skier in question is Eero Antero Mäntyranta.

50% hematocrit level is approximately 165 g/liter Hb.
 
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twisted pairs said:
Merckx index said:
There surely must be an auto-EPO syndrome out there, in which your HT goes up to 60 because of weird metabolism. Actually, there are genes known to do that in mice.

Some Scandinavians have a distinct genetic advantage over everyone else. See the following vintage paper;

Truncated erythropoietin receptor causes dominantly inherited benign human erythrocytosis
(translation: some people carry a mutant EPO gene that results in naturally high hematocrit levels)
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC46538/pdf/pnas01462-0175.pdf

From the text:
"The clinical condition is so mild that many affected individuals are not themselves aware of any abnormality, nor do they have any sense of illness. The clinical and laboratory findings based on the study of 25 affected and 72 unaffected family members can be summarized as follows (15). Hb is remarkably high: mean male value, 204 g/liter; range, 183-231 g/liter (normal: mean, 154; range, 136-174); mean female value, 191 g/liter; range, 177-200 g/liter (normal: mean, 138; range, 124-153)."

"The proband, a 53-year-old male, whose Hb level has been 200 g/liter or greater since childhood (last
measurement, 236 g/liter), has been one of the best cross country skiers in the world, having won three Olympic gold medals and two world championships."

The skier in question is Eero Antero Mäntyranta.

50% hematocrit level is approximately 165 g/liter Hb.

IIRC, some of his siblings with the same gain-of-function EPO-receptor mutation incurred serious and related complications (strokes, clots). He died in his 70's, perhaps protected during his lifetime by other gene polymophisms or his propensity to exercise.
 
Oct 10, 2015
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twisted pairs said:
Some Scandinavians have a distinct genetic advantage over everyone else. See the following vintage paper
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC46538/pdf/pnas01462-0175.pdf
Huh. I suppose that's the same study that JV referred to some time ago. I remember him talking about it, and a deep Google search brought me back here.

JV1973 said:
Also, an old Finnish study (if you can find it) found that athletes with higher Vo2 maxes benefitted less from EPO use than those who started with lower Vo2 maxes. The more talented athlete were (generally) benefitting less. Another observation of that study was that ectomorphic body types showed less increase than mesomorphic types. So, the variables on the exact advantage are endless and vary person to person (A BIG counterpoint to the argument that just letting everyone dope is fair). I read this study in about 1995 and haven't seen it anywhere since, so i cant find a link, sorry...
 
Re: Re:

Jacques de Molay said:
twisted pairs said:
Some Scandinavians have a distinct genetic advantage over everyone else. See the following vintage paper
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC46538/pdf/pnas01462-0175.pdf

Huh. I suppose that's the same study that JV referred to some time ago. I remember him talking about it, and a deep Google search brought me back here.

No, this is something different, the article you cite provides a basis for an inherited trait in which individuals have a very high HT, which gives them the same advantage in endurance sports that you would expect if they used exogenous EPO to raise their HT to that level. JV was referring to a study in which athletes with a high V02max do not get the normal benefit expected from EPO.

I searched long and hard for the paper referred to by JV at the time, and could never find it. But the possibility is not unreasonable. There may be a number of inverse physiological relationships like that, due to compensating factors. As we have discussed here earlier, there is some evidence that efficiency may be inversely related to V02max. It's also been reported that as HT increases above 50-55%, the relative benefit of the extra cells decreases, at least in part because the increased viscosity of the blood reduces flow. I'd have to go back and look at that thread, but IIRC, there was actually a biphasic or U-shaped curve, such that at a certain point increases in HT actually result in lower oxygen access.

If riders with high V02max benefit less from EPO, that may be either because EPO raises their HT less than typically, or that raised HT has less of an effect than typically. The latter seems more likely to me. An effect on the EPO-erythrocytosis relationship would have to involve a long chain of causal processes, whereas an effect on oxygen transport/usage of RBC could occur more directly. E.g., athletes may achieve a high V02max in part through a relatively efficient use of oxygen, such that further increasing red cell number does not lead to much greater usage.
 
Aug 15, 2012
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Re: Re:

Merckx index said:
Jacques de Molay said:
twisted pairs said:
Some Scandinavians have a distinct genetic advantage over everyone else. See the following vintage paper
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC46538/pdf/pnas01462-0175.pdf

Huh. I suppose that's the same study that JV referred to some time ago. I remember him talking about it, and a deep Google search brought me back here.

No, this is something different, the article you cite provides a basis for an inherited trait in which individuals have a very high HT, which gives them the same advantage in endurance sports that you would expect if they used exogenous EPO to raise their HT to that level. JV was referring to a study in which athletes with a high V02max do not get the normal benefit expected from EPO.

I searched long and hard for the paper referred to by JV at the time, and could never find it. But the possibility is not unreasonable. There are may be a number of inverse physiological relationships like that, due to compensating factors. As we have discussed here earlier, there is some evidence that efficiency may be inversely related to V02max. It's also been reported that as HT increases above 50-55%, the relative benefit of the extra cells decreases, at least in part because the increased viscosity of the blood reduces flow. I'd have to go back and look at that thread, but IIRC, there was actually a biphasic or U-shaped curve, such that at a certain point increases in HT actually result in lower oxygen access.

If riders with high V02max benefit less from EPO, that may be either because EPO raises their HT less than typically, or that raised HT has less of an effect than typically. The latter seems more likely to me. An effect on the EPO-erythrocytosis relationship would have to involve a long chain of causal processes, whereas an effect on oxygen transport/usage of RBC could occur more directly. E.g., athletes may achieve a high V02max in part through a relatively efficient use of oxygen, such that further increasing red cell number does not lead to much greater usage.


Right. Thus the relative conversion in my post between hematocrit and g/liter Hb.
 
Sep 23, 2009
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_yngve_ said:
Darryl Webster said:
On grounds of religon could a Mormon claim the taking of blood transgreses there religous convictions?:rolleyes:

I don't think the Mormons have a prohibition against it, but perhaps Jehova's Witnesses (or do they just forbid blood transfusions?)


They are not allowed to cycle, as that would be cheating.

Against God's will!!
 
Apr 3, 2011
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D Avoid said:
_yngve_ said:
Darryl Webster said:
On grounds of religon could a Mormon claim the taking of blood transgreses there religous convictions?:rolleyes:

I don't think the Mormons have a prohibition against it, but perhaps Jehova's Witnesses (or do they just forbid blood transfusions?)


They are not allowed to cycle, as that would be cheating.

Against God's will!!
Brilliant idea- how come this was not yet used as "clean PR"?

Just imagine: "500 tests! As Jehova Witness!" #whatareyouon
 
Jun 2, 2015
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Here's a good one from Irina Marachevoy (800 m runner, RUS). Apparently due to a childhood head injury when she goes to altitude it messes up her blood values and has thus causes abnormal passport readings! Nonetheless given 2 years ban.

Google translate:

'The fact is that in childhood Ira got a very serious head injury. She was hit by a car that has led to a severe concussion. Because of this, it has at altitude greatly changed blood parameters. But to prove 100% that the relationship between childhood trauma of the head and today's blood jumps, we can not. Ira took doping test several times. When Her blood was taken, together with the urine, no claims, no one was. But to punish us for the doping sample taken when analyzing only blood. "

Подробнее на ТАСС:
http://tass.ru/sport/2612617
 
It was the eggs what done it:deets
I mean, if Tyson and Hughie Fury blamed the Nandrolone in their system on eating boar testicles, so UKADA has heared worse, that time the stereotypes about Irish travellers probably helped

Errani's "my mother lost a diuretic pill and it ended up in the Pasta of the handmade Tortellini" sounds like an offensive joke one would make about a doped Italian and is still one of the best we've heared over the last few years.
 
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Reactions: noob and Sciatic
Hard to believe that
" I came up positive because I must of absorbed the drug while giving it to my sick,dying dog"
and that is reported today in Cycling News.!!!.and as if the story and circumstances couldn't be any more stupid.. Nash the UCI Vice President is the one pissing purple.. Cycling needs to call FIFA,NFL,NBA,NHL,MLB all have way more, thousands more athletes participating at all levels and their sports have problems..
also have mountains of revenue and TV and media coverage, sponsors on waiting lists to give them many more money and none have any stories about the VP positive piss for a dog appetite stimulant..
Bike racing can't even get doping right.. The riders and owners are getting what from riders unions and UCI oversight?
Rhetorical question.. Just look at tennis or football, any other sport and you can see that upside down, backwards management has the sport floundering in it's own sauce.. The take away.. Be really careful when you feed your dog..and to use another dog reference.. Cycling is chasing it's own tail..
 

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