Brits don't dope?

Page 100 - Get up to date with the latest news, scores & standings from the Cycling News Community.
Oct 16, 2010
19,912
1
0
Jul 22, 2015
127
0
0
Re: Re:

King Boonen said:
wrinklyvet said:
King Boonen said:
wrinklyvet said:
The Carrot said:
Credit to the Hitch's Twitter account for finding this but it was tailor made for this thread...and I am looking forward to Blackcat's comments.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/science/science-news/12189003/Britain-has-most-honest-citizens-in-the-world...-because-politicians-are-less-corrupt.html

FFS
There must be a lot more to this study than the Telgraph has reported. Perhaps like me they don't want to purchase the full paper from Nature http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nature17160.html
Interestingly for those with an interest in how long it takes to get to press with a scientific paper, I see this was "Received 09 April 2015, Accepted 25 January 2016, Published online 09 March 2016." That aside of mine about timing relates to the Froome thing that so many would like to see.
I don't have to pay, there appear to be some pretty big question marks...
It sounds a bit simplistic to me, I must admit. The conclusions may be plausible but does the research actually lead there? If not it is lacking value.
They test honesty by rewarding dishonesty with money. Put it this way, if you labelled the data by GDP you'd basically get the same answer...
The amount of the reward is adjusted by the PPP of the test subject's country of origin.

This bit actually skews heavily in favor of test subjects from poorer countries being honest since it will tend to be an even smaller percentage of their or their families' net worth. Making the assumption that these kids are from the upper crust of their society by being able to afford to go to school in the UK instead of working in sweat shop.
 
Jun 4, 2015
499
0
0
Re: Re:

The Carrot said:
Credit to the Hitch's Twitter account for finding this but it was tailor made for this thread...and I am looking forward to Blackcat's comments.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/science/science-news/12189003/Britain-has-most-honest-citizens-in-the-world...-because-politicians-are-less-corrupt.html

FFS
Having spent time in some less affluent countries, corruption is, for many, a way of survival, is pervasive and culturally ingrained at all levels. Making an honest living is very difficult as opposed to in a country like the UK. While we (Brits) might generally be less dishonest than some people, that doesn't mean there isn't lots of dishonesty. Corruption in the UK is rife, instances are reported on every day involving; justice, politics, business, banking etc. The incentives and execution are nuanced but clearly, many Brits aren't above a bit of skulduggery. So with regards doping, pro sport being an unregulated (big) business, it will naturally will have a degree of corruption in all countries, including ours, the 'it's only Johnny foreigner' stance just doesn't stand up, It's probable that Britain may well have more clean athletes than most, but it's also going to have lots and lots of dirty ones.
 
I buried it in the middle of a long post on the Tennis thread here
viewtopic.php?p=1879770#p1879770

But this bit in the Sunday Times may well get one snowball rolling :

Walsh writes about abuse of TUEs, (without mentioning the dawg) and then goes on
"...Before the 2012 Olympics 1500m runner Lewis Moses posted a tweet about the drug "I'm sick of hearing about British athletes taking thyroid medication. Might not test positive but you're cheating."

That is a Brit athlete accusing the support staff and other Brit athletes of cheating. Now that doesn't happen every day.

That sounds like someone who is p1ssed with the system. Might well be a guy ready to do enough to bring some others down. In the Calvert piece in the main paper Professor David Cowan of King's College London is quoted as saying "there is evidence of overuse of corticosteroids in cycling". It is not attributed to any nation but all this is gathering a bit of a head of steam.
 
Re: Re:

jahn said:
The amount of the reward is adjusted by the PPP of the test subject's country of origin.

This bit actually skews heavily in favor of test subjects from poorer countries being honest since it will tend to be an even smaller percentage of their or their families' net worth. Making the assumption that these kids are from the upper crust of their society by being able to afford to go to school in the UK instead of working in sweat shop.
No it doesn't, because your assumption is wrong. The paper clearly states that the experiments were conducted in 23 different countries. If I'm offered enough money to buy my lunch if I lie, but I've eaten whenever I want for the last few days I'm a lot less likely to lie than someone who is offered the equivalent but may only get one or two proper meals a day at most.
 
Oct 16, 2010
19,912
1
0
Football involved? Impossibru.
FIFA is closely collaborating with the renowned Lausanne Lab for years. And none other than Lausanne's own Martial Saugy has vouched for the cleanliness of that sport on various occasions.
QS: Isn’t it a huge challenge for the lab to handle so many tests in such a short time?

Saugy: It is indeed a big challenge for us, but we are already used to that kind of major event. Our laboratory is part of the CHUV (University Hospital in Lausanne) and is used to emergency services. And of course, the good relationship we have with FIFA helps a lot. Since the accreditation of the laboratory in Rio was revoked, we prepared carefully all the analyses and organisation with Professor Dvorak in order to get the samples in proper condition and to analyse them as soon as they arrive in the lab. This is a challenge, but the laboratory team is proud to be part of the event.

QS: Football is often criticised for not doing enough in the fight against doping. How would you respond to such criticism?

Saugy: FIFA has been investing in the field of anti-doping research for many years. Since the 1998 World Cup in France, our laboratory has been collaborating with FIFA and Professor Dvorak to establish the best strategies in the fight against doping. As far back as the 2002 World Cup in Korea/Japan, FIFA collected the first blood samples and implemented EPO tests in football. Now, its key role in the implementation of biological monitoring is also a consequence of years of research in the steroid profiling of football players.
http://www.fifa.com/worldcup/news/y=2014/m=6/news=dvorak-saugy-outline-anti-doping-strategies-2354961.html
Saugy: In general, sports featuring individuals are more exposed to doping than team sports. Given the speed at which information can travel nowadays, it seems to me it would be very difficult to set up an organised structure with which to dope an entire team.
http://www.swissinfo.ch/eng/doping-and-the-world-cup_-every-footballer-in-brazil-will-be-tested-/38730424
 
Oct 16, 2010
19,912
1
0
thehog said:
LOL! CHUV Is where Dawg did his infamous 2007 testing :rolleyes:
The Lausanne Lab and Saugy have a long tradition of being the go-to guys for clean sports and athletes.
Always at the forefront of antidoping.
 
Oct 25, 2012
181
0
3,680
UKAD said they tried to investigate him after a whistle blower came forward but couldn't because he wasn't attached to any sporting organisation.
 
Feb 6, 2016
1,213
0
0
I'm sceptical this inquiry has any point whatsoever, except possibly as a PR exercise. If it ever reports, I'll be surprised.
 
Re:

Chaddy said:
UKAD said they tried to investigate him after a whistle blower came forward but couldn't because he wasn't attached to any sporting organisation.
They certainly could investigate but can't sanaction. The investigation might have uncovered athletes doping. UKAD clearly not concerned.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY