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Contador must release his blood passport

Protein

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Sep 30, 2010
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I have an open mind on whether Contador is guilty of doping. I am probably willing to give him the benefit of the doubt, but one way to clear it up would be for him to release his blood passport. If the red blood cells show an obvious increase on the rest day then it would confirm the doping theory. However if it appears normal then it's more than likely contaiminated meat.

If he has nothing to hide he should do it to settle this matter.
 
May 6, 2009
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Protein said:
I have an open mind on whether Contador is guilty of doping. I am probably willing to give him the benefit of the doubt, but one way to clear it up would be for him to release his blood passport. If the red blood cells show an obvious increase on the rest day then it would confirm the doping theory. However if it appears normal then it's more than likely contaiminated meat.

If he has nothing to hide he should do it to settle this matter.

He's already denied taking any transfusions and claims he has nothing to hide.
 
Protein said:
Yes so he should have no problems releasing his blood passport to clear this up.

I'm with you-but it won't happen-
when he won his 1st TDF title-with all the mess happening around that year-he was asked if he was willing to provide his DNA to clear his name once for all from the OP involvement- he said IF he has to, he could-but he wouldn't since the "release" of it could be utilized for the wrong reasons!! AC has already learnt from the Hog not to release personal data, since the public scrutiny can crucify you when something is quite suspicious or out of place.....
 
Jul 29, 2010
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It wouldn't prove anything....Floyd has already stated that it's easy to manipulate...Ashenden already proved you can micro-dose and not trip the passport...
 
Mar 4, 2010
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NashbarShorts said:
It wouldn't prove anything....Floyd has already stated that it's easy to manipulate...Ashenden already proved you can micro-dose and not trip the passport...

Didn't Floyd's htc jump from 43% to ~47% during the Tour when a drop below 40% would have been expected?

There's a difference between not "tripping" the passport and avoiding obvious indications of doping. See Lance 2009.
 
Jul 6, 2010
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WTF? What do you mean that HE has to release his blood passport? Isn't that now the 'property' of the UCI?

As I've said before, I've been out of the loop for most of a decade, but if the UCI or WADA are not the holders of this information then what's the f*ucking point?

Is he not legally bound to allow the disclosure of the information (based on his licence)? If he's not, then the UCI has actually sunk to a lower status than I thought possible.

Maybe some form of corporate human-liver fluke. And that's nasty...

Someone please prove me wrong... If the riders have this sort of control over disclosure, then the sport is truly hooped...
 
Jul 6, 2010
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NashbarShorts said:
It wouldn't prove anything....Floyd has already stated that it's easy to manipulate...Ashenden already proved you can micro-dose and not trip the passport...

Yes, but noone really wants to keep their HC jacked for the whole season (or off-season for that matter).

I was under the impression that the passport would allow the investigative entities a sort of long-term chart of rider's HC (among other values). Micro-dosing can keep your HC relatively stable, but elevated (that's the whole idea). Over long-term OOC testing it should be evident that someone's HC is at a certain level, and that it should actually drop under duress (eg: stage racing).

I think the passport is a good way for the UCI to look like they're doing something whithout really doing anything. It looks like everyone's back to slamming their own blood into themselves, and thank god that some folks are coming up with tests that can show containment issues.

Mind you, you can still pretty much get off... Unless you're jacking too much clen in the off-season...
 
Mar 18, 2009
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JMBeaushrimp said:
As I've said before, I've been out of the loop for most of a decade, but if the UCI or WADA are not the holders of this information then what's the f*ucking point?

Is he not legally bound to allow the disclosure of the information (based on his licence)? If he's not, then the UCI has actually sunk to a lower status than I thought possible.

The riders are not legally bound to allow publication of their biological passport (BP). Armstrong tried to be transparent about his BP results last year, but that only increased suspicion during the TdF because of highly improbable changes in his BP values (but just within the UCI limits). Why would a rider willingly expose themselves to this sort of scrutiny by armchair experts? Their BP values and trends are analyzed by a committee of experts. Ultimately we have to trust that this committee are above reproach and doing their job appropriately.

The stance of the UCI and WADA, and one which I personally agree with, is that there should be no chance that an innocent rider is wrongly accused of doping, even if this means that guilty riders are not detected. That is why WADA and the UCI set certain limits on what is deemed a positive test, even if much lower levels would normally be considered positive. It is for this reason that I am surprised by Contador's positive result to such a small amount of Clenbuterol.

The athletes should also be protected during this whole process, something which the UCI have been woefully negligent about. In no other sport other than cycling are athletes ratted out by their organizing body before B samples have been analyzed. Not only does this affect the reputation and livelihood of the cyclist, even if they are found innocent or not guilty, but it further reflects badly on professional cycling.
 
Jul 6, 2010
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The riders should allow disclosure by armchair analysts/cynics. That would remove a lot of the cloud around their behaviour.

It's not rocket science to say that one's HC should remain somewhat stable over the course of one's life. If it looks more plastic or dynamic, then something's up. If we're paying for the UCI to uphold doping controls, and create the BP, then we should see it. We should be the ones receiving full disclosure.