Doping in other sports?

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Jan 20, 2010
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Australian triathlete Lisa Marangon popped for Ostarine and will receive a four year ban. Usual lame excuses.

You can read a bit more about Ostarine (MK 2866) here, pretty much freely available in gyms now so will be commonly used by athletes http://www.evolutionary.org/ostarine-mk-2866-anabolic-steroids/

Ostarine exerts its effects in a very anabolic way, comparisons have been made with the Anabolic steroid primobolan. Generally, a user will see increased muscle mass, very positive effect on joints and bones, as well as as boost in nitrogen retention.
Another interesting aspect, as opposed to your typical steroid, is that SARMS remain very hard to detect for anti-doping agencies. Since SARMS bypass the well known 4 ring steroid structure, they are not steroids. However, SARMS exert many of the same performance enhancing effects that steroids do, without the side effects (3)
 
Jan 20, 2010
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Re:

Alex Simmons/RST said:
This news seems to have passed the clinic by, although I don't visit all threads so may not have seen it here:

http://www.smh.com.au/rugby-league/league-news/stephen-dank-still-plans-to-expose-league-club-in-spite-of-shooting-incident-20160730-gqhdxz.html

Stephen Dank, the guy behind several football teams' supplements / injection programs, was shot the other day just before giving a speech in which he plans to name and shame another football club.
1. I bet the shooting was a setup.
2. The name and shame allegations would be more of his same BS.
 
Re: Re:

Night Rider said:
Alex Simmons/RST said:
This news seems to have passed the clinic by, although I don't visit all threads so may not have seen it here:

http://www.smh.com.au/rugby-league/league-news/stephen-dank-still-plans-to-expose-league-club-in-spite-of-shooting-incident-20160730-gqhdxz.html

Stephen Dank, the guy behind several football teams' supplements / injection programs, was shot the other day just before giving a speech in which he plans to name and shame another football club.
1. I bet the shooting was a setup.
2. The name and shame allegations would be more of his same BS.
1. for what purpose?

2. who knows? but he did say he's still planning to do it. time will tell I suppose
 
Re: Re:

Night Rider said:
Alex Simmons/RST said:
This news seems to have passed the clinic by, although I don't visit all threads so may not have seen it here:

http://www.smh.com.au/rugby-league/league-news/stephen-dank-still-plans-to-expose-league-club-in-spite-of-shooting-incident-20160730-gqhdxz.html

Stephen Dank, the guy behind several football teams' supplements / injection programs, was shot the other day just before giving a speech in which he plans to name and shame another football club.
1. I bet the shooting was a setup.
2. The name and shame allegations would be more of his same BS.
If it was a set up it was a good one as the bullet grazed his head !
 
Jan 20, 2010
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Yes, saw the photos at the time. Black eye, grazed forehead and bullet holes. It's not like the three couldn't be staged if you wanted?

From your own article ... and another journalist alluded to it being staged the week before.

There have been suggestions that you staged the shooting? "Horse hockey," he said.

Do the police have any leads? "No."
Dank is a compulsive liar who craves attention, relevance and needs money from interviews, I will believe it was a 'hit' when the police charge someone.
 
Mar 11, 2009
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Nick C. said:
movingtarget said:
That is a cool article. It's more like a female swimmer who got beat for gold medals by the East German machine in 1976. She obliquely referenced the roiding before the games (deep voices and mustaches) and was chastised for being mean and a poor sport.

Wonder if she would be as generous to Ledecky and Franklin.
 
Don’t know where else to put this. Another call to legalize PEDS, based on the futility of stopping them:

In 2012, WADA-accredited laboratories worldwide conducted approximately 270,000 doping tests; just over one percent revealed the use of banned substances. Testing done by the London and Beijing Olympics, MLB, the NCAA, and high school sports officials in New Jersey and Texas reveal a similar rate of positives. Nobody believes the true incidence of sports doping is anywhere near that low. A 2013 WADA study that anonymously surveyed more than 2,000 track and field athletes found that an estimated 29 percent of participants at the 2011 world championships and 45 percent of participants at the Pan-Arab Games had doped during the previous year. A 2015 study published in Sports Medicine estimated that as many as 39 percent of elite international athletes used PEDs. One witness interviewed for a Cycling Independent Reform Commission report released last year claimed that 90 percent of cyclists use drugs, despite some of the toughest testing in sports.
A former professional cyclist who spoke to VICE Sports on the condition of anonymity is more blunt. "If you look at [USADA's] overall success rate, they are astoundingly ineffective," the cyclist says. "They spend more than $10 million a year, millions of that coming from the [federal] government, and they are *** useless."
Charles Yesalis, a Penn State University emeritus professor and longtime sports-doping researcher, says that more money for testing probably won't yield better results. Not when athletes are simply too motivated, clever, and willing to push the envelope in order to win. To wit: a year-long professional sports PED investigation by the Australian Crime Commission found that athletes were using a series of drugs that weren't on WADA's banned list, including pig-brain and calf-blood extracts and an anti-obesity drug that was still going through human clinical trials.
The anonymous professional cyclist was part of a team that doped. The cyclist says they did so carefully, both to avoid detection and to protect their health. Among the drugs they used was the red-blood-cell-booster EPO. The average person's proportion of red blood cells, or hematocrit number, is around 44 percent. According to a 2004 article in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, a hematocrit reading of 51 percent or more increases the risk of stroke and heart attack. The anonymous cyclist's team kept their levels around 47 percent, roughly the same range that can be achieved through high-altitude training. "Sitting here [now], I have zero side effects from EPO," says the cyclist. "The system we had in place was completely conservative." The cyclist explains that the doctor overseeing his team's PED program "believed that, yes, you have to do this, because everyone was doing this. But we were not going to be reckless or crazy. If one [injection] gets you to the finish line, one is enough. We're not going to do ten. We had a situation with a drug that was ten percent beneficial [to performance], completely undetectable, and if taken under a doctor's care, completely safe. I was cool with that. No problem.

"But there was other stuff out there. Synthetic hemoglobin. PFC [a dangerous drug invented to treat severe battlefield blood loss]. Veterinary stuff. Clinical trials stuff. Crazy stuff. You see that, and you're like, 'I don't even care if it's cheating or not, somebody is going to croak here.' You can get into some pretty bad ***, pretty quick."
Milot cites a 2009 study in which researchers found that between 21 and 53 percent of the black-market steroids they examined were counterfeit, and that some contained harmful bacteria. "What happens is that in order to circumvent testing, people shift from relatively safe drugs to ones we know nothing about," she says. "Or they take oral steroids instead of injectable ones—because the orals clear your system faster. Well, they also cause organ damage. From a health perspective, that is a disaster."
https://sports.vice.com/en_us/article/the-drugs-won-the-case-for-ending-the-sports-war-on-doping
 
Aug 3, 2016
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MartinGT said:
Pep Guardiola has apparently told his overweight players they cant train. So how do they lose weight?

UKAD will no doubt be on it :rolleyes:
I have been reading this forum for a fair few years and always thought it pretty fair and informative.


This post has finally gave me the initiative to actually sign up and post as it is so ridiculous and untrue it stretches into the realms of fantasy.

Guardiola has told players that if they are overweight they will not be training with the first team squad until they are at their correct weight. They will be training with specialist fitness coaches at the City Football Academy. Every Premier team will do this as a norm. Players coming back from long injuries are often a little overweight due to inactivity and so train with specialists to get them back to 100%

Or was your post a veiled reference to the fact that the City Football Academy is only 500 yards from the Manchester Velodrome and the nominal home of British Cycling and Team Sky and they both alongside MCFC have access to the new Sports Science Institute that is part of the Etihad Campus.
 
USADA have cleared 34-year-old UFC bantamweight fighter Guangyou Ning after testing positive for a minute amount of clenbuterol, stating it was very likely he ate contaminated meat while in China.

Anybody else see an inconsistency in labeling it a "zero-tolerance" policy but them waiving it because the amount was minute and the source was likely but not proved to be accidental ingestion?
 
Apr 17, 2010
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Or they take oral steroids instead of injectable ones—because the orals clear your system faster. Well, they also cause organ damage. From a health perspective, that is a disaster.

LOL. Like we're supposed to care about health outcomes for those trying to cheat. Life choices people, life choices. Live with them.

Even if we allow anything to go, the only hope to get people on the same stuff would be to make it demonstrably better than alternatives, and people will still always be looking for the next best thing. Risks will remain.
 
Dana White is floating the idea that there are new developments in the Jon Jones doping case. He is implying that both USADA and NSAC are investigating the possibility that the two substances Jones tested positive for (one a selective estrogen receptor modulator and the other an aromitase inhibitor) could have arisen for causes other than being in a post-steroidal cycle recovery phase. And he's dropping hints that Jones will be back in the octagon soon.

Maybe it's just me but the fact that Jones' went into hiding underneath the gym's octagon at the approach of the USADA men and stayed there until the gym closed in the evening tells me he was into something underarm.

It also bears mention that the UFC have changed ownership since signing USADA to do its PEDs testing. Which raises the possibility that the new owners might not be so keen on being assured their fighters are cleans.
 
An Olympic weight lifter from Kyrgyzstan has been popped for taking rat poison. Actually is was strychnine, the active ingredient in some rat poisons. In small doses, it apparently reduces the signal strength a muscle requires before it will fire, which helps keep the muscles firing when you're knackered. It apparently also was used in professional cycling back in the "chloroform and cocaine" days.


And on a lighter note, Jon Jones apparently is invoking the "This is so humiliating to admit, it must be true" defence. Same as Anderson "Spider" Silva before him, he is blaming the PEDs positive on a men's sex aid medication, in Jones' case a generic version of the drug trade named Cialis.

Dana is leading the charge for a reduced sentence for Jones, but Silva's like claim buttered no parsnips with the NSAC, who hit him with a one-year suspension, the longest that their rules then allowed for the infraction. Jones is damned twice over by his own words, since his defence also is an admission that he put something into his body he did not know the content of, and also that he was taking a pharmaceutical without notifying USADA/UFC.
 
Aug 20, 2016
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Big tennis fan here.

It's clear that tennis is riddled with to major problems that the governing bodies (ATP/ITF) are completely unwilling to do anything. First is doping but the other issue is match fixing that is even more obvious and it's incredulous that nothing is done.

As for doping... Well the standard of drug testing is laughable and such is the sport it is clear huge advantages can be made from doping. There are 2-3 top players now who are so obviously on/have taken x and y it is almost sad. Nothing will be done of course, except for the occasional silent ban.
 
USADA have exonerated two more UFC fighters (Augusto Montano of Mexico, and Li Jingliang of China) after testing positive for trace amounts of clenbuterol. As I noted above, they already issued a finding of "no fault" against another Chinese fighter, Guangyou Ning, for the same infraction.

So despite their formal zero-tolerance pledge, USADA now formally have tolerated 100% of the 2016 positives for clenbuterol.
 
Oct 16, 2010
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I remember someone claiming that the majority of gymnasts is likely clean.
The phrase "think twice" springs to mind.
 
Re:

StyrbjornSterki said:
USADA have exonerated two more UFC fighters (Augusto Montano of Mexico, and Li Jingliang of China) after testing positive for trace amounts of clenbuterol. As I noted above, they already issued a finding of "no fault" against another Chinese fighter, Guangyou Ning, for the same infraction.

So despite their formal zero-tolerance pledge, USADA now formally have tolerated 100% of the 2016 positives for clenbuterol.
This could end up being a real problem thanks to Mick Rogers getting off. Chinese and Mexican athletes were basically given the green light to juice on clen after that verdict.
 

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