Teams & Riders Froome Talk Only

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Re: Re:

brownbobby said:
sittingbison said:
brownbobby said:
sittingbison said:
brownbobby said:
. No emotional investment you see ;)

This particular conversation was specific to if he'll be allowed in this year's tour (legal circumstance permitting) and if so what kind of reception he'll get. Not from the die hard cycling fans to whom this doping debate means a great deal, but the hundreds of thousands (maybe millions) of casual spectators who line the roads in France every July.

Yes, I get your point about people now 'knowing' but how does that translate to emotions on the side of the road. A few comments on here seemed to suggest that a baying lynch mob awaited him in France should he dare to ride the tour.

I don't believe this is the case, but it is an interesting sub topic for me with my annual trip to the Alps looming in July
Yup, no emotional investment for you, hey brownbobby. And of course, none of those tourist cycling fans and French people lining the TDF route would dream of their hero Dawg lieing to and cheating them of their emotional and monetary investment for 6 years. Nope, they will all cheer Dawg and Sky on to an wheezing win.

After all, nothing to see here, move along (Allez Allez)
Eh?? Never happened before. Oh wait, I see what you're doing now, projecting what you think I want to hear is going to happen to let me know that you know that I'm really just another Sky apologist trying to cover my tracks.

Well played Sir. No fooling you.
Couldn't have said it better myself
But still you tried. Tried to come up with a new and amusing way to garner some virtual high 5's from your fellow guardians. Shame this isn't Facebook. Shame there isn't a like button so you can gauge your approval ratings for such witty outings of folk.

I give up. No point in trying to convince you guys that I'm not a Skybot.

I have to refer to the words of the Great Prophet "How do you prove a negative"
No one needs to prove anything. 99 out of 100 accounts that posted like you turned out to be exactly what sittinbison claims you are.

Maybe you are, maybe you aren't but sittingbison is free to believe something about you without having to prove it. You cant control what he thinks.
 
Sep 11, 2016
122
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Re: Re:

Tonton said:
sittingbison said:
Panache

Virenque, Jaja, Pirata, Diablo etc got it in spades that's why you (we) still like them

Not Wiggo or Dawg. Panachless
Good point. Being the devil's advocate, I would argue that for a Brit, '13 Ventoux or '15 PSM are glorious. It's in the eyes of each of us. And the running man episode still showed in highlights, although it never happened since Portal went whining to the officials and results were "adjusted". Now for Wiggo...I can't find a glorious moment :eek: . Or maybe him trying to chase Froome :D . Now that was courage.
The thing is, it is hard to erase good memories. And similarly for many danes still, Riis' 96 win will cause a great smile on their face, myself included. Not all of course. Even though we know now that he was doped with EPO, blood bags and other substances.
Likewise, I still get bitter when thinking of Michael Rasmussens disqualification in 07. I remember feeling gutted at the time because that Tour de France was the most exciting race, I had seen in a long time. And it still is for me, even though I now wonder how I, at the time, could get so exited and totally disregard the absurdity in the performance of the duo.
At the time, in the immediate dissapointment, Contador was the bad guy for me, but I have later realised what a great rider he really was again in spite of the difficulty in believing that the Clenbuterol should be from a beef.

I am pretty sure, that I will never change my stance on Sky and Froome in that way. I didn't enjoy them when they calculated and machine-like strangled all competition in the Tour de France and I won't enjoy it in the future, if they try. Because they wanted us to believe they were the best by a distance while being different, and stubbornly stuck to more and more far-fetched explanations to their extreme domination. While everybody who had followed cycling for some years could not find one example of such a case not involving some kind of doping.

That is indeed lack of panache, arrogance and somehow a (very unfortunate) misunderstanding of the history of the sport.
 
Re: Re:

Yup, no emotional investment for you, hey brownbobby. And of course, none of those tourist cycling fans and French people lining the TDF route would dream of their hero Dawg lieing to and cheating them of their emotional and monetary investment for 6 years. Nope, they will all cheer Dawg and Sky on to an wheezing win.

After all, nothing to see here, move along (Allez Allez)[/quote]

Eh?? Never happened before. Oh wait, I see what you're doing now, projecting

Maybe you are, maybe you aren't but sittingbison is free to believe something about you without having to prove it. You cant control what he thinks.[/quote]
[/b]

Once again, your hypocrisy astounds
 
Re: Re:

Tonton said:
sittingbison said:
Panache

Virenque, Jaja, Pirata, Diablo etc got it in spades that's why you (we) still like them

Not Wiggo or Dawg. Panachless
Good point. Being the devil's advocate, I would argue that for a Brit, '13 Ventoux or '15 PSM are glorious. It's in the eyes of each of us. And the running man episode still showed in highlights, although it never happened since Portal went whining to the officials and results were "adjusted". Now for Wiggo...I can't find a glorious moment :eek: . Or maybe him trying to chase Froome :D . Now that was courage.
You present the Devils advocate view very well I think.

Your earlier comments almost acknowledge that, eh, we don't like doping, but it happens. So if you're gonna do it, do it with panache, don't take the piss too much, and were still gonna like what we like.

Now, you have to understand that for some, I'd even say most, in the U.K., panache isn't something we care so much about. I'm not just talking cycling here, I'm talking sport in general. What we do love is a good story. And we like winners. If we find someone who wins things, and sells us a good story, overcoming a tough upbringing, adversity in earlier life, overcoming all obstacles to achieve greatness, then for some we've got a hero.

Now we've all seen through all this, we've done our research, we've been with the story from the start. We know it's all BS. But for everyone of us, there are many more who think they know Chris Froome because they read the climb. He fits the bill. If only he was actually born in the U.K., and he did something other than ride a bike, he'd be our perfect hero. But we still like him. We still gonna cheer for him when he's showing all those foreigners what British courage and ambition can achieve.

In the microclimate of the Clinic, His fate is sealed. He's busted. Done. But step outside into the wider world, and he's still very much alive and kicking. He's had more column inches in the UK this week than he's had in the previous 5 years, but outside of the specialist press, and the inner circle of 'proper' cycling fans, the number of messages of support, the "eh we believe in you Chris" plastered across social media is overwhelmingly positive for him.

Don't forget cycling has grown enormously in the U.K. In recent years. The casual cycling fan, the ones who know all they need to know about Froome from reading his biography, far outnumbers the 'real' cycling fans. And their voices are just as loud.

I'm not going to try and tell you where I stand on this. You think what you think.

But I'm on the ground in the UK, I'm amongst the cycling fans, new and old. This is my report of how it's looking in my little corner of the British Isles. Froome ain't dead yet. He's very much alive and kicking.

Only time will tell for how long he stays that way.
 
Sep 11, 2016
122
0
0
Re: Re:

brownbobby said:
Tonton said:
sittingbison said:
Panache

Virenque, Jaja, Pirata, Diablo etc got it in spades that's why you (we) still like them

Not Wiggo or Dawg. Panachless
Good point. Being the devil's advocate, I would argue that for a Brit, '13 Ventoux or '15 PSM are glorious. It's in the eyes of each of us. And the running man episode still showed in highlights, although it never happened since Portal went whining to the officials and results were "adjusted". Now for Wiggo...I can't find a glorious moment :eek: . Or maybe him trying to chase Froome :D . Now that was courage.
You present the Devils advocate view very well I think.

Your earlier comments almost acknowledge that, eh, we don't like doping, but it happens. So if you're gonna do it, do it with panache, don't take the piss too much, and were still gonna like what we like.

Now, you have to understand that for some, I'd even say most, in the U.K., panache isn't something we care so much about. I'm not just talking cycling here, I'm talking sport in general. What we do love is a good story. And we like winners. If we find someone who wins things, and sells us a good story, overcoming a tough upbringing, adversity in earlier life, overcoming all obstacles to achieve greatness, then for some we've got a hero.

Now we've all seen through all this, we've done our research, we've been with the story from the start. We know it's all BS. But for everyone of us, there are many more who think they know Chris Froome because they read the climb. He fits the bill. If only he was actually born in the U.K., and he did something other than ride a bike, he'd be our perfect hero. But we still like him. We still gonna cheer for him when he's showing all those foreigners what British courage and ambition can achieve.

In the microclimate of the Clinic, His fate is sealed. He's busted. Done. But step outside into the wider world, and he's still very much alive and kicking. He's had more column inches in the UK this week than he's had in the previous 5 years, but outside of the specialist press, and the inner circle of 'proper' cycling fans, the number of messages of support, the "eh we believe in you Chris" plastered across social media is overwhelmingly positive for him.

Don't forget cycling has grown enormously in the U.K. In recent years. The casual cycling fan, the ones who know all they need to know about Froome from reading his biography, far outnumbers the 'real' cycling fans. And their voices are just as loud.

I'm not going to try and tell you where I stand on this. You think what you think.

But I'm on the ground in the UK, I'm amongst the cycling fans, new and old. This is my report of how it's looking in my little corner of the British Isles. Froome ain't dead yet. He's very much alive and kicking.

Only time will tell for how long he stays that way.
Good post.
 
Re: Re:

pastronef said:
I agree with the Hitch (!) too. it's like I said, knowing he used super fuel, but not having him, Sniper, Digger, Hog, Antoine Vayer, Stokes and co officially say "we were right"
that was the fun part, the sneaky amusement. useless I know.
now everything has changed. I'll keep cheering for Sky like mad (Moscon, Kwiato, Stan, Poels, Bernal etc) but with Froome, with his positive test, it'll be like Alberto fans, blind to the fact he tested positive. I am not blind.
what I mean is I am not deluded, sad, shocked he failed a test. I wasnt fooled. I know how it works.
it happens, it's pro cycling.
it will be less fun, knowing all people praying and wishing he failed a test and got caught have now, rightly, seen their wish come true.
Fair enough. I respect your candor. And as an anti-Sky, I don't feel like rubbing it in. It's sad. And like ahsoe wrote, for fans of the sport, these races, these memories mean a lot. These are moments in our life. Regardless of who we root for. As much as I'm happy that the fraud is being exposed, I feel bad for the Froome fans. Bitter-sweet...
 
Re: Re:

Tonton said:
Fair enough. I respect your candor. And as an anti-Sky, I don't feel like rubbing it in. It's sad. And like ahsoe wrote, for fans of the sport, these races, these memories mean a lot. These are moments in our life. Regardless of who we root for. As much as I'm happy that the fraud is being exposed, I feel bad for the Froome fans. Bitter-sweet...
thank you. I must add that following the people who know about pro cycling on twitter and in the Clinic sometimes I forget what Ahsoe said:
"In the microclimate of the Clinic, His fate is sealed. He's busted. Done. But step outside into the wider world, and he's still very much alive and kicking.[...] The casual cycling fan, the ones who know all they need to know about Froome from reading his biography, far outnumbers the 'real' cycling fans. And their voices are just as loud."
 
Re: Re:

brownbobby said:
You present the Devils advocate view very well I think.

Your earlier comments almost acknowledge that, eh, we don't like doping, but it happens. So if you're gonna do it, do it with panache, don't take the piss too much, and were still gonna like what we like.

Now, you have to understand that for some, I'd even say most, in the U.K., panache isn't something we care so much about. I'm not just talking cycling here, I'm talking sport in general. What we do love is a good story. And we like winners. If we find someone who wins things, and sells us a good story, overcoming a tough upbringing, adversity in earlier life, overcoming all obstacles to achieve greatness, then for some we've got a hero.

Now we've all seen through all this, we've done our research, we've been with the story from the start. We know it's all BS. But for everyone of us, there are many more who think they know Chris Froome because they read the climb. He fits the bill. If only he was actually born in the U.K., and he did something other than ride a bike, he'd be our perfect hero. But we still like him. We still gonna cheer for him when he's showing all those foreigners what British courage and ambition can achieve.

In the microclimate of the Clinic, His fate is sealed. He's busted. Done. But step outside into the wider world, and he's still very much alive and kicking. He's had more column inches in the UK this week than he's had in the previous 5 years, but outside of the specialist press, and the inner circle of 'proper' cycling fans, the number of messages of support, the "eh we believe in you Chris" plastered across social media is overwhelmingly positive for him.

Don't forget cycling has grown enormously in the U.K. In recent years. The casual cycling fan, the ones who know all they need to know about Froome from reading his biography, far outnumbers the 'real' cycling fans. And their voices are just as loud.

I'm not going to try and tell you where I stand on this. You think what you think.

But I'm on the ground in the UK, I'm amongst the cycling fans, new and old. This is my report of how it's looking in my little corner of the British Isles. Froome ain't dead yet. He's very much alive and kicking.

Only time will tell for how long he stays that way.
Good post. "only time will tell". I'm no Brit and won't venture arguing with you about the mindset in the UK, although what you describe (winning/story) is not unique to the UK...Lance was the same thing: big story, big winner. At the same stage, he received a lot of support too. Time wasn't on his side...
 
Aug 31, 2012
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Well, delusional tribalism will obviously not go away, ever, but the Sky-are-cleanliest-but-beware-of-dodgy-foreigners- they- dope narrative is dead now at the mainstream media level. There's no going back whatever happens to Froome.
 
Re: Re:

brownbobby said:
Tonton said:
sittingbison said:
Panache

Virenque, Jaja, Pirata, Diablo etc got it in spades that's why you (we) still like them

Not Wiggo or Dawg. Panachless
Good point. Being the devil's advocate, I would argue that for a Brit, '13 Ventoux or '15 PSM are glorious. It's in the eyes of each of us. And the running man episode still showed in highlights, although it never happened since Portal went whining to the officials and results were "adjusted". Now for Wiggo...I can't find a glorious moment :eek: . Or maybe him trying to chase Froome :D . Now that was courage.
You present the Devils advocate view very well I think.

Your earlier comments almost acknowledge that, eh, we don't like doping, but it happens. So if you're gonna do it, do it with panache, don't take the piss too much, and were still gonna like what we like.

Now, you have to understand that for some, I'd even say most, in the U.K., panache isn't something we care so much about. I'm not just talking cycling here, I'm talking sport in general. What we do love is a good story. And we like winners. If we find someone who wins things, and sells us a good story, overcoming a tough upbringing, adversity in earlier life, overcoming all obstacles to achieve greatness, then for some we've got a hero.

Now we've all seen through all this, we've done our research, we've been with the story from the start. We know it's all BS. But for everyone of us, there are many more who think they know Chris Froome because they read the climb. He fits the bill. If only he was actually born in the U.K., and he did something other than ride a bike, he'd be our perfect hero. But we still like him. We still gonna cheer for him when he's showing all those foreigners what British courage and ambition can achieve.

In the microclimate of the Clinic, His fate is sealed. He's busted. Done. But step outside into the wider world, and he's still very much alive and kicking. He's had more column inches in the UK this week than he's had in the previous 5 years, but outside of the specialist press, and the inner circle of 'proper' cycling fans, the number of messages of support, the "eh we believe in you Chris" plastered across social media is overwhelmingly positive for him.

Don't forget cycling has grown enormously in the U.K. In recent years. The casual cycling fan, the ones who know all they need to know about Froome from reading his biography, far outnumbers the 'real' cycling fans. And their voices are just as loud.

I'm not going to try and tell you where I stand on this. You think what you think.

But I'm on the ground in the UK, I'm amongst the cycling fans, new and old. This is my report of how it's looking in my little corner of the British Isles. Froome ain't dead yet. He's very much alive and kicking.

Only time will tell for how long he stays that way.
To the bold the jingoistic hubris and corporate prepotency, whilst claiming the high moral ground, makes Sky and British Cycling's comeuppance so savory.
 
Re:

SeriousSam said:
Well, delusional tribalism will obviously not go away, ever, but the Sky-are-cleanliest-but-beware-of-dodgy-foreigners- they- dope narrative is dead now at the mainstream media level. There's no going back whatever happens to Froome.
Exactly. While brownbobby presented what (s)he considerd the benevolent side of the story more or less accurately, here is the underbelly, which isnt an unfortunate excess but part of the deal: tribalism cum nationalism with corporate sponsorship.
 
Re: Re:

Tonton said:
brownbobby said:
You present the Devils advocate view very well I think.

Your earlier comments almost acknowledge that, eh, we don't like doping, but it happens. So if you're gonna do it, do it with panache, don't take the piss too much, and were still gonna like what we like.

Now, you have to understand that for some, I'd even say most, in the U.K., panache isn't something we care so much about. I'm not just talking cycling here, I'm talking sport in general. What we do love is a good story. And we like winners. If we find someone who wins things, and sells us a good story, overcoming a tough upbringing, adversity in earlier life, overcoming all obstacles to achieve greatness, then for some we've got a hero.

Now we've all seen through all this, we've done our research, we've been with the story from the start. We know it's all BS. But for everyone of us, there are many more who think they know Chris Froome because they read the climb. He fits the bill. If only he was actually born in the U.K., and he did something other than ride a bike, he'd be our perfect hero. But we still like him. We still gonna cheer for him when he's showing all those foreigners what British courage and ambition can achieve.

In the microclimate of the Clinic, His fate is sealed. He's busted. Done. But step outside into the wider world, and he's still very much alive and kicking. He's had more column inches in the UK this week than he's had in the previous 5 years, but outside of the specialist press, and the inner circle of 'proper' cycling fans, the number of messages of support, the "eh we believe in you Chris" plastered across social media is overwhelmingly positive for him.

Don't forget cycling has grown enormously in the U.K. In recent years. The casual cycling fan, the ones who know all they need to know about Froome from reading his biography, far outnumbers the 'real' cycling fans. And their voices are just as loud.

I'm not going to try and tell you where I stand on this. You think what you think.

But I'm on the ground in the UK, I'm amongst the cycling fans, new and old. This is my report of how it's looking in my little corner of the British Isles. Froome ain't dead yet. He's very much alive and kicking.

Only time will tell for how long he stays that way.
Good post. "only time will tell". I'm no Brit and won't venture arguing with you about the mindset in the UK, although what you describe (winning/story) is not unique to the UK...Lance was the same thing: big story, big winner. At the same stage, he received a lot of support too. Time wasn't on his side...
It is not unique at all. It is called nationalism.

I can see pretty much similar stories all over the place in other sports. Most of the Norwegians don't think their XC skiing stars Therese Johaug (18 months ban for steroids from lipcream) or Martin Johnsrud Sundby (Salbutamol from Nebuliser) has done anything wrong. They are seen as victims. Same for Russians inside Russia in general.

But it doesn't mean the rest of the world needs to agree and hail for the nationalism shown. The contrary.

In some other countries the situation is very different though. In my home country any fellow countryman that gets busted is immediate cheat, regardless of who (s)he is and what has been taken. I guess we are in general pragmatic and sceptical.
 
Re: Re:

The Hitch said:
No one needs to prove anything. 99 out of 100 accounts that posted like you turned out to be exactly what sittinbison claims you are.

Maybe you are, maybe you aren't but sittingbison is free to believe something about you without having to prove it. You cant control what he thinks.
Yeah but one is not allowed to make personal attack such as calling someone a bot or whatever. We can think what we want.
 
Re: Re:

red_flanders said:
The Hitch said:
No one needs to prove anything. 99 out of 100 accounts that posted like you turned out to be exactly what sittinbison claims you are.

Maybe you are, maybe you aren't but sittingbison is free to believe something about you without having to prove it. You cant control what he thinks.
Yeah but one is not allowed to make personal attack such as calling someone a bot or whatever. We can think what we want.
To be fair he didn't. I called myself that to save him the job!
 
Apr 3, 2016
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Meh, it was only asthma meds, the public I think will be unimpressed. Froome will race on, possibly doing the “impossible” double next year and earn his rank amongst the legends. Steroids, transfusions or EPO though and he would be done. Don’t worry too much guys, CRISPER/CAS9 is here and the age of genetic doping is already upon us, it’s just a ride.

BTW Funny to see so many Contador fans in here acting outraged.
 
Here's the thing, this happens with all winners, and then all racers when they get busted: 'The are successful they must be doped/motored up. They got popped so now we have proof.' In the aftermath most forget that they are all pushing the system. CF might not be as jacked as other riders in the platoon (or on his team). I agree with others that this is likely the result of too many marginal methods colliding to create a mega AAF.

A guy who played here at BSU and them went on to a solid NFL career does local sports radio gigs occasionally, and he has said several times that the ones who get busted aren't doing anything different than most, they are just stupid.
 
Jun 21, 2012
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Re: Re:

brownbobby said:
Tonton said:
sittingbison said:
Panache

Virenque, Jaja, Pirata, Diablo etc got it in spades that's why you (we) still like them

Not Wiggo or Dawg. Panachless
Good point. Being the devil's advocate, I would argue that for a Brit, '13 Ventoux or '15 PSM are glorious. It's in the eyes of each of us. And the running man episode still showed in highlights, although it never happened since Portal went whining to the officials and results were "adjusted". Now for Wiggo...I can't find a glorious moment :eek: . Or maybe him trying to chase Froome :D . Now that was courage.
You present the Devils advocate view very well I think.

Your earlier comments almost acknowledge that, eh, we don't like doping, but it happens. So if you're gonna do it, do it with panache, don't take the piss too much, and were still gonna like what we like.

Now, you have to understand that for some, I'd even say most, in the U.K., panache isn't something we care so much about. I'm not just talking cycling here, I'm talking sport in general. What we do love is a good story. And we like winners. If we find someone who wins things, and sells us a good story, overcoming a tough upbringing, adversity in earlier life, overcoming all obstacles to achieve greatness, then for some we've got a hero.

Now we've all seen through all this, we've done our research, we've been with the story from the start. We know it's all BS. But for everyone of us, there are many more who think they know Chris Froome because they read the climb. He fits the bill. If only he was actually born in the U.K., and he did something other than ride a bike, he'd be our perfect hero. But we still like him. We still gonna cheer for him when he's showing all those foreigners what British courage and ambition can achieve.

In the microclimate of the Clinic, His fate is sealed. He's busted. Done. But step outside into the wider world, and he's still very much alive and kicking. He's had more column inches in the UK this week than he's had in the previous 5 years, but outside of the specialist press, and the inner circle of 'proper' cycling fans, the number of messages of support, the "eh we believe in you Chris" plastered across social media is overwhelmingly positive for him.

Don't forget cycling has grown enormously in the U.K. In recent years. The casual cycling fan, the ones who know all they need to know about Froome from reading his biography, far outnumbers the 'real' cycling fans. And their voices are just as loud.

I'm not going to try and tell you where I stand on this. You think what you think.

But I'm on the ground in the UK, I'm amongst the cycling fans, new and old. This is my report of how it's looking in my little corner of the British Isles. Froome ain't dead yet. He's very much alive and kicking.

Only time will tell for how long he stays that way.
Finger on the pulse eh? As if.
 
Re: Re:

Brian Butterfield said:
brownbobby said:
Tonton said:
sittingbison said:
Panache

Virenque, Jaja, Pirata, Diablo etc got it in spades that's why you (we) still like them

Not Wiggo or Dawg. Panachless
Good point. Being the devil's advocate, I would argue that for a Brit, '13 Ventoux or '15 PSM are glorious. It's in the eyes of each of us. And the running man episode still showed in highlights, although it never happened since Portal went whining to the officials and results were "adjusted". Now for Wiggo...I can't find a glorious moment :eek: . Or maybe him trying to chase Froome :D . Now that was courage.
You present the Devils advocate view very well I think.

Your earlier comments almost acknowledge that, eh, we don't like doping, but it happens. So if you're gonna do it, do it with panache, don't take the piss too much, and were still gonna like what we like.

Now, you have to understand that for some, I'd even say most, in the U.K., panache isn't something we care so much about. I'm not just talking cycling here, I'm talking sport in general. What we do love is a good story. And we like winners. If we find someone who wins things, and sells us a good story, overcoming a tough upbringing, adversity in earlier life, overcoming all obstacles to achieve greatness, then for some we've got a hero.

Now we've all seen through all this, we've done our research, we've been with the story from the start. We know it's all BS. But for everyone of us, there are many more who think they know Chris Froome because they read the climb. He fits the bill. If only he was actually born in the U.K., and he did something other than ride a bike, he'd be our perfect hero. But we still like him. We still gonna cheer for him when he's showing all those foreigners what British courage and ambition can achieve.

In the microclimate of the Clinic, His fate is sealed. He's busted. Done. But step outside into the wider world, and he's still very much alive and kicking. He's had more column inches in the UK this week than he's had in the previous 5 years, but outside of the specialist press, and the inner circle of 'proper' cycling fans, the number of messages of support, the "eh we believe in you Chris" plastered across social media is overwhelmingly positive for him.

Don't forget cycling has grown enormously in the U.K. In recent years. The casual cycling fan, the ones who know all they need to know about Froome from reading his biography, far outnumbers the 'real' cycling fans. And their voices are just as loud.

I'm not going to try and tell you where I stand on this. You think what you think.

But I'm on the ground in the UK, I'm amongst the cycling fans, new and old. This is my report of how it's looking in my little corner of the British Isles. Froome ain't dead yet. He's very much alive and kicking.

Only time will tell for how long he stays that way.
Finger on the pulse eh? As if.
oh FFS. Here we go again.

No substance. No debate. Nothing to say but desperate to say something.

Trolling in its purest form.

When does it ever stop :rolleyes:
 
Re: Re:

brownbobby said:
Tonton said:
sittingbison said:
Panache

Virenque, Jaja, Pirata, Diablo etc got it in spades that's why you (we) still like them

Not Wiggo or Dawg. Panachless
Good point. Being the devil's advocate, I would argue that for a Brit, '13 Ventoux or '15 PSM are glorious. It's in the eyes of each of us. And the running man episode still showed in highlights, although it never happened since Portal went whining to the officials and results were "adjusted". Now for Wiggo...I can't find a glorious moment :eek: . Or maybe him trying to chase Froome :D . Now that was courage.
You present the Devils advocate view very well I think.

Your earlier comments almost acknowledge that, eh, we don't like doping, but it happens. So if you're gonna do it, do it with panache, don't take the piss too much, and were still gonna like what we like.

Now, you have to understand that for some, I'd even say most, in the U.K., panache isn't something we care so much about. I'm not just talking cycling here, I'm talking sport in general. What we do love is a good story. And we like winners. If we find someone who wins things, and sells us a good story, overcoming a tough upbringing, adversity in earlier life, overcoming all obstacles to achieve greatness, then for some we've got a hero.

Now we've all seen through all this, we've done our research, we've been with the story from the start. We know it's all BS. But for everyone of us, there are many more who think they know Chris Froome because they read the climb. He fits the bill. If only he was actually born in the U.K., and he did something other than ride a bike, he'd be our perfect hero. But we still like him. We still gonna cheer for him when he's showing all those foreigners what British courage and ambition can achieve.

In the microclimate of the Clinic, His fate is sealed. He's busted. Done. But step outside into the wider world, and he's still very much alive and kicking. He's had more column inches in the UK this week than he's had in the previous 5 years, but outside of the specialist press, and the inner circle of 'proper' cycling fans, the number of messages of support, the "eh we believe in you Chris" plastered across social media is overwhelmingly positive for him.

Don't forget cycling has grown enormously in the U.K. In recent years. The casual cycling fan, the ones who know all they need to know about Froome from reading his biography, far outnumbers the 'real' cycling fans. And their voices are just as loud.

I'm not going to try and tell you where I stand on this. You think what you think.

But I'm on the ground in the UK, I'm amongst the cycling fans, new and old. This is my report of how it's looking in my little corner of the British Isles. Froome ain't dead yet. He's very much alive and kicking.

Only time will tell for how long he stays that way.
we don't have to wait too long....tomorrow night will be interesting and we can put your theory to the test....an upsurge in support for 'froomey' at the SPOTY award or a drop-off by an unsympathetic public who (though the jiffy bag debacle) are beginning to see what marginal gains really means.....

I feel you may have misjudged the book reading Froome fans....................
 
Oude Geuze said:
Meh, it was only asthma meds, the public I think will be unimpressed. Froome will race on, possibly doing the “impossible” double next year and earn his rank amongst the legends. Steroids, transfusions or EPO though and he would be done. Don’t worry too much guys, CRISPER/CAS9 is here and the age of genetic doping is already upon us, it’s just a ride.

BTW Funny to see so many Contador fans in here acting outraged.
One might remember Riis and Contador talking about the “triple” for his positive to come out days later. Froome talks about the double and “bang!” he’s gone as well! :cool:
 
Re: Re:

brownbobby said:
gillan1969 said:
silvergrenade said:
gillan1969 said:
70kmph said:
His reign is nearly finished because too old for the Tour now. Unless Sky can find a replacement they will start looking like has-beens for a few years, maybe they can target a monument or start a string of failed assaults at the big tours...
when horner can win a GT at whatever age using whatever help then unfortunately, when you have an athlete which nothing makes sense about, I wouldn't write-off the hapless hero being around for a while longer....rubbing it in the nose of everyone for a while yet I fear......
Yup. And the only thing you can do is cry and whine about it. It's so funny.
i think you'll find I've gone down the "if you didn't laugh you would cry" road with the hapless froome...however its his supporters that i reserve the biggest laugh for.... ;)
Hapless seems to be quite a common term used to precede any reference to Froome on this forum. I find this strange. Considering that he's now, according to the record books and until proven otherwise, one of the most successful GT riders of all time, all achieved according to some with next to zero natural talent, then i would argue that he is the very antithesis of hapless
:confused:
our hapless hero........ ;)
 
Re: Re:

gillan1969 said:
brownbobby said:
Tonton said:
sittingbison said:
Panache

Virenque, Jaja, Pirata, Diablo etc got it in spades that's why you (we) still like them

Not Wiggo or Dawg. Panachless
Good point. Being the devil's advocate, I would argue that for a Brit, '13 Ventoux or '15 PSM are glorious. It's in the eyes of each of us. And the running man episode still showed in highlights, although it never happened since Portal went whining to the officials and results were "adjusted". Now for Wiggo...I can't find a glorious moment :eek: . Or maybe him trying to chase Froome :D . Now that was courage.
You present the Devils advocate view very well I think.

Your earlier comments almost acknowledge that, eh, we don't like doping, but it happens. So if you're gonna do it, do it with panache, don't take the piss too much, and were still gonna like what we like.

Now, you have to understand that for some, I'd even say most, in the U.K., panache isn't something we care so much about. I'm not just talking cycling here, I'm talking sport in general. What we do love is a good story. And we like winners. If we find someone who wins things, and sells us a good story, overcoming a tough upbringing, adversity in earlier life, overcoming all obstacles to achieve greatness, then for some we've got a hero.

Now we've all seen through all this, we've done our research, we've been with the story from the start. We know it's all BS. But for everyone of us, there are many more who think they know Chris Froome because they read the climb. He fits the bill. If only he was actually born in the U.K., and he did something other than ride a bike, he'd be our perfect hero. But we still like him. We still gonna cheer for him when he's showing all those foreigners what British courage and ambition can achieve.

In the microclimate of the Clinic, His fate is sealed. He's busted. Done. But step outside into the wider world, and he's still very much alive and kicking. He's had more column inches in the UK this week than he's had in the previous 5 years, but outside of the specialist press, and the inner circle of 'proper' cycling fans, the number of messages of support, the "eh we believe in you Chris" plastered across social media is overwhelmingly positive for him.

Don't forget cycling has grown enormously in the U.K. In recent years. The casual cycling fan, the ones who know all they need to know about Froome from reading his biography, far outnumbers the 'real' cycling fans. And their voices are just as loud.

I'm not going to try and tell you where I stand on this. You think what you think.

But I'm on the ground in the UK, I'm amongst the cycling fans, new and old. This is my report of how it's looking in my little corner of the British Isles. Froome ain't dead yet. He's very much alive and kicking.

Only time will tell for how long he stays that way.
we don't have to wait too long....tomorrow night will be interesting and we can put your theory to the test....an upsurge in support for 'froomey' at the SPOTY award or a drop-off by an unsympathetic public who (though the jiffy bag debacle) are beginning to see what marginal gains really means.....

I feel you may have misjudged the book reading Froome fans....................
It will indeed be nteresting, but not so informative in terms of judging any swing in the public reaction to this week's events.

For that we would need a baseline of how the vote would go prior to this week to measure any surge or decline.

As voting doesn't open until the show starts we do not have that.

We can of course guess, and my guess up until this week was that he was in with a good chance of third. No better.
 

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