Teams & Riders Froome Talk Only

Page 622 - Get up to date with the latest news, scores & standings from the Cycling News Community.
Oct 16, 2010
19,912
1
0
very true.
compare also to soccer and tennis, where all the doping and bloodspinning is explained away as necessary treatment for injuries.

in the Kimmage interview, Froome says "Each rider is assigned a doctor on the team and you go to that doctor for your day-to-day problems".
What day-to-day problems do riders have other than the administration and monitoring of PEDs?
 
Re:

sniper said:
very true.
compare also to soccer and tennis, where all the doping and bloodspinning is explained away as necessary treatment for injuries.

in the Kimmage interview, Froome says "Each rider is assigned a doctor on the team and you go to that doctor for your day-to-day problems".
What day-to-day problems do riders have other than the administration and monitoring of PEDs?
To be fair I'd interpret that as basically what a GP does for me. Flu, fatigue (out of the normal), upset stomachs, headaches etc. These are highly trained athletes who are worth a lot of money to their teams and they should be monitored closely by team doctors and have someone they can approach about even minor things.

That doesn't preclude doping of course.
 
Oct 16, 2010
19,912
1
0
Re: Re:

King Boonen said:
sniper said:
very true.
compare also to soccer and tennis, where all the doping and bloodspinning is explained away as necessary treatment for injuries.

in the Kimmage interview, Froome says "Each rider is assigned a doctor on the team and you go to that doctor for your day-to-day problems".
What day-to-day problems do riders have other than the administration and monitoring of PEDs?
To be fair I'd interpret that as basically what a GP does for me. Flu, fatigue (out of the normal), upset stomachs, headaches etc. These are highly trained athletes who are worth a lot of money to their teams and they should be monitored closely by team doctors and have someone they can approach about even minor things.

That doesn't preclude doping of course.
fair points i guess.
But with all the attention for food, Sky only have one nutrionist (mitchell). That's meager compared to four doctors.
 
Jul 5, 2009
2,440
3
0
Yeah, I've always wondered what all those doctors do to fill their day. My local clinic usually has on doctor on staff at any given time and they still process at least three patients per hour. Even if you send one doctor to each race, I really can't see what they're doing all day. Weird.

John Swanson
 
May 26, 2010
28,144
2
0
Re: Re:

King Boonen said:
sniper said:
very true.
compare also to soccer and tennis, where all the doping and bloodspinning is explained away as necessary treatment for injuries.

in the Kimmage interview, Froome says "Each rider is assigned a doctor on the team and you go to that doctor for your day-to-day problems".
What day-to-day problems do riders have other than the administration and monitoring of PEDs?
To be fair I'd interpret that as basically what a GP does for me. Flu, fatigue (out of the normal), upset stomachs, headaches etc. These are highly trained athletes who are worth a lot of money to their teams and they should be monitored closely by team doctors and have someone they can approach about even minor things.

That doesn't preclude doping of course.
Bsssons talked about only seeing the team doctor once over 2 years for something, iirc. That tells us a lot.
 
Re:

ScienceIsCool said:
Yeah, I've always wondered what all those doctors do to fill their day. My local clinic usually has on doctor on staff at any given time and they still process at least three patients per hour. Even if you send one doctor to each race, I really can't see what they're doing all day. Weird.

John Swanson
Saddle sores are a constant battle.
 
Aug 4, 2011
3,647
0
0
Re: Re:

red_flanders said:
ScienceIsCool said:
Yeah, I've always wondered what all those doctors do to fill their day. My local clinic usually has on doctor on staff at any given time and they still process at least three patients per hour. Even if you send one doctor to each race, I really can't see what they're doing all day. Weird.

John Swanson
Saddle sores are a constant battle.

Yeah, I remember Armstrong took something for saddle sores :D
 
Re:

ScienceIsCool said:
Yeah, I've always wondered what all those doctors do to fill their day. My local clinic usually has on doctor on staff at any given time and they still process at least three patients per hour. Even if you send one doctor to each race, I really can't see what they're doing all day. Weird.

John Swanson
The mother of all rhetorical questions. :)
 
Feb 24, 2014
516
0
0
Re:

ScienceIsCool said:
Yeah, I've always wondered what all those doctors do to fill their day. My local clinic usually has on doctor on staff at any given time and they still process at least three patients per hour. Even if you send one doctor to each race, I really can't see what they're doing all day. Weird.

John Swanson
Maybe they puff up the pillows, monitor the amount of Nutella in the blood, determine the amount of pineapple juice in the bidons, etc etc etc
 
Oct 16, 2010
19,912
1
0
Was looking at Cancellara's acceleration in PR 2010 and thinking whether I've ever seen such an inhumane accelleration from any other rider.
The one that comes closest in my memory is probably Froome's famous 2013 Ventoux jump.
Here it is. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-eiN2vfGKhk
Now look carefully at the slowmotion starting at ca. 2:00, then particularly at his handmovement at 2:06 and 2:07, which is exactly when he decides to jump and pull out that alien accelleration.
Is he clicking/switching something on his steering wheel right there?
 
Jul 21, 2012
9,860
0
0
Yeah if anything stands out as a motor moment in recent memory it's that one. It just looks like his legs are spinning so fast that he can hardly keep up.
 
Feb 24, 2014
516
0
0
Re:

the sceptic said:
Yeah if anything stands out as a motor moment in recent memory it's that one. It just looks like his legs are spinning so fast that he can hardly keep up.
The bizarre thing is that he said in the Kimmage interview that he had been practicing that style of attack in a wind tunnell!!! Has he done a similar type of attack since, where he almost spins out of control like that? I can't recall...
 
Jul 11, 2013
3,340
0
0
Re:

sniper said:
Was looking at Cancellara's acceleration in PR 2010 and thinking whether I've ever seen such an inhumane accelleration from any other rider.
The one that comes closest in my memory is probably Froome's famous 2013 Ventoux jump.
Here it is. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-eiN2vfGKhk
Now look carefully at the slowmotion starting at ca. 2:00, then particularly at his handmovement at 2:06 and 2:07, which is exactly when he decides to jump and pull out that alien accelleration.
Is he clicking/switching something on his steering wheel right there?
It does look like He's trying to keep up with the bike -and not the other way round...

Almost like if he's surprised by the tempo of his gear....

Prolly just marginal gains...
 
Jul 11, 2013
3,340
0
0
What I can't get my head around is that he in a tougher gear would have done even better...

This was almost too easy...

Now he's back to earth(ish) performances...

I actually thought they would bench him last year (for being too obvious), and his riding style did change from 13' to 14'...

nevertheless he was doing well (but not total alien) in TheVuelta...

Will be interesting to see if he's still in A-list come le tour....
 
Oct 16, 2010
19,912
1
0
Yeah if anything stands out as a motor moment in recent memory it's that one. It just looks like his legs are spinning so fast that he can hardly keep up.
The bizarre thing is that he said in the Kimmage interview that he had been practicing that style of attack in a wind tunnell!!! Has he done a similar type of attack since, where he almost spins out of control like that? I can't recall...
It does look like He's trying to keep up with the bike -and not the other way round...
Almost like if he's surprised by the tempo of his gear....
Prolly just marginal gains...
look closely at the distance he takes on Contador in that first curve after his accelleration (min. 1:50 to 2:00 in the following link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5gWyd8pPbr0).
the speed he generates there, that's not normal if you consider the small gear he's riding.
looks as if he's getting a boost right there from something other than just his legs.
 
sniper said:
Yeah if anything stands out as a motor moment in recent memory it's that one. It just looks like his legs are spinning so fast that he can hardly keep up.
The bizarre thing is that he said in the Kimmage interview that he had been practicing that style of attack in a wind tunnell!!! Has he done a similar type of attack since, where he almost spins out of control like that? I can't recall...
It does look like He's trying to keep up with the bike -and not the other way round...
Almost like if he's surprised by the tempo of his gear....
Prolly just marginal gains...
look closely at the distance he takes on Contador in that first curve after his accelleration (min. 1:50 to 2:00 in the following link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5gWyd8pPbr0).
the speed he generates there, that's not normal if you consider the small gear he's riding.
looks as if he's getting a boost right there from something other than just his legs.
Now that you mention it... :eek:
 
Jul 11, 2013
3,340
0
0
It does look ridiculous... I thought only F1 had turbo enabler in the "car"...

Anyways -I don't think you can get away with that long term..
Other contenders will know and be too unhappy with being beated by bike motors..

But if it secures a TDF win it may be worth a risk or two...

And in the case of Froome it may turn out most plausible explanation...

Sh!te...
 
mrhender said:
But if it secures a TDF win it may be worth a risk or two...

And in the case of Froome it may turn out most plausible explanation...
That season Froome won Oman, Romandie and Dauphine, was the strongest in Tirreno.

Was he using a motor every race that season?

If yes - then that doesn't fit with what you say about it being risky. clearly its not a risk if they are willing to use it in smaller WT races and even non WT races like Oman. They should have only used it in the TDF.

If no- then why would they risk using the motor at all, considering Froome was strong enough anyway to destroy everyone all season long (as well as in some races in 2011, 2012 and 2014).

Also in that TDF Froome won 1 tt and was the strongest in the other (would have been the 3rd fastest tt ever if not for some headwind at the end). Was he using a motor there.

Add in his AX 3 stage and what was the point for Froome to use a motor on Ventoux. He had the TDF wrapped up by that stage already, he was way ahead of everyone.

The only way a motor theory makes sense is if Sky have been using it all along for him Porte and Wiggins since 2011. But in that case why hire Lienders, Yates, Jullich etc. Why use it in meaningless early season races. Why not use it in classics and other gts? How and why did Froome and Wiggins lose 10kg if not AICAR.

Its far fetched
 
Oct 16, 2010
19,912
1
0
Re:

The Hitch said:
mrhender said:
But if it secures a TDF win it may be worth a risk or two...

And in the case of Froome it may turn out most plausible explanation...
That season Froome won Oman, Romandie and Dauphine, was the strongest in Tirreno.

Was he using a motor every race that season?

If yes - then that doesn't fit with what you say about it being risky. clearly its not a risk if they are willing to use it in smaller WT races and even non WT races like Oman. They should have only used it in the TDF.

If no- then why would they risk using the motor at all, considering Froome was strong enough anyway to destroy everyone all season long (as well as in some races in 2011, 2012 and 2014).

Also in that TDF Froome won 1 tt and was the strongest in the other (would have been the 3rd fastest tt ever if not for some headwind at the end). Was he using a motor there.

Add in his AX 3 stage and what was the point for Froome to use a motor on Ventoux. He had the TDF wrapped up by that stage already, he was way ahead of everyone.

The only way a motor theory makes sense is if Sky have been using it all along for him Porte and Wiggins since 2011. But in that case why hire Lienders, Yates, Jullich etc. Why use it in meaningless early season races. Why not use it in classics and other gts? How and why did Froome and Wiggins lose 10kg if not AICAR.

Its far fetched
agree with all this.
but look at the footage. that accelleration is far fetched as well.

and mind: the hypothetical motor will give you a one-time boost of maybe half a minute, so you're still gonna need doping, and lots of it, to be up there up front in the mountains of a GT in the first place.

He did look incredibly strong during the entire season and i agree its impossible/pointless to argue he'd been using a motor all the time. But maybe that motor was his Mont V. victory insurance. A one time thing. (just thinking out loud).

Did froome change bikes before the start of the climb? If not, i guess that would further diminish the plausibiity of a motor theory.
 
Aug 31, 2012
7,550
1
0
Rewatching that Ventaux attack the aesthetics are simply priceless. So hilariously over the top. What on earth am I watching
 
Aug 2, 2012
5,971
1
0
how i would laugh if da dawg was caught with a motor in his dogma..............thinking back to the '13 tour froome

only went turbo on 2 stages.....AX3.....ventoux? on other mountain stages he looked............kinda ordinary?

my thought however is that 'turbo' spin is just a result of the very low gearing used........

Mark L
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY