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General Doping Thread.

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Jul 5, 2018
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To beat a dead horse, exercising muscles to exhaustion requires recovery. EPO aids muscle recovery. Show me a study that says otherwise.
 
Jul 5, 2018
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The argument that a couple of you are making in regards to baseball players is only remotely valid if you assume that baseball players don't work out off of the field in order to maximize their on field abilities. If you do assume that you are wrong. The same can be said of nearly every sport.
 
To beat a dead horse, exercising muscles to exhaustion requires recovery. EPO aids muscle recovery. Show me a study that says otherwise.
I think we all understand and point well taken. I think folks are just saying that there are dozens of other ways to accomplish the same, and typically other substances have been used in sports like baseball. EPO isn't the first thing one would think of. May have to do with the particulars of the testing regime in baseball, maybe something else. It's interesting is all.
 
Jul 5, 2018
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I think we all understand and point well taken. I think folks are just saying that there are dozens of other ways to accomplish the same, and typically other substances have been used in sports like baseball. EPO isn't the first thing one would think of. May have to do with the particulars of the testing regime in baseball, maybe something else. It's interesting is all.
I guess we would all be naive to put anything past any professional athlete in any sport. The last thing I thought a cyclist would test positive for is strychnine, but a former teammate of mine did just that while he was racing for Jelly Belly!
 
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Apparently the case of Sofie De Vuyst is very complex, says Hans Vandewehge, who is somewhat of an authority on the subject. Things that have been released in the press, are not correct. But proving her innocence will cost a lot of money and given her age (32), he wonders if she won't just retire.

Too bad he doesn't specify what is so complex about here case, just that he has never seen a case like this.
 
Back to supplements: UKAD, boxing and the Dillian Whyte case:
UK Anti-Doping and the professional boxer, Dillian Whyte, can today jointly confirm that Mr Whyte was charged with an anti-doping rule violation (ADRV) earlier this year, but that this charge has now been withdrawn.
More questions than answers here so let's go from the top:
The British Boxing Board of Control, having delegated responsibility for anti-doping matters to UKAD, has been informed of the resolution of these proceedings against Mr Whyte.
Is UKAD's role in boxing like USADA's role in MMA? Boxing isn't part of WADA, has it's own rules, and the management is outsourced to UKAD?

The facts of the case:
  • There is nothing in Mr Whyte's longitudinal urinary profile to suggest that he has used steroids.
  • The levels of the metabolites found in Mr Whyte's 20 June 2019 sample were extremely low.
  • Mr Whyte had provided a urine sample to VADA on 17 June 2019, i.e. 3 days before his 20 June 2019 sample, which was tested by a WADA-accredited laboratory and which returned a negative result, including for the metabolites in question.
  • Mr Whyte provided several other doping control samples to UKAD and VADA between 20 June and 20 July 2019 (i.e. the date of his fight with Oscar Rivas) – all of which also tested negative.
  • In light of the above points, the trace amounts of metabolites found in the 20 June 2019 sample are consistent with an isolated contamination event, and they are not suggestive of doping.
At the heart of it, then, UKAD are saying the Dianabol entered Whyte's system between the 17th and the 20th and by the 20th was in such low amounts they concluded it wasn't performance enhancing. Can we confidently assume this is a tainted supplement?

Has anyone looked at the actual rules here (soz, I'm being lazy today and not looking for them myself) and do they allow for thresholds, like the amended MMA rules do? Or is there a get out of gaol free card in the strict liability clause that allows UKAD to say "We ain't never caught this guy doping before and we really need to catch em twice in order to punish em once?"
 
At the heart of it, then, UKAD are saying the Dianabol entered Whyte's system between the 17th and the 20th and by the 20th was in such low amounts they concluded it wasn't performance enhancing. Can we confidently assume this is a tainted supplement?
Not necessarily. If dianabol was the drug in question (I'm going on your post, am not familiar with the case), that has a half-life of 3-6 hours. So if he had taken a large dose right after the test, it probably would have been detectable onlyin trace amounts 2-3 days later. If he was tested several times following that date, and was negative, that one hypothetical dose on the 17th or 18th would be all he took, which would seem unlikely. However, if he hadn't expected to be tested on the 20th, and as a result of that test he was told (or expected) he would be tested again soon, he might have stopped taking it altogether.
 
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Here's one I didn't know: Asafa Powell and Sherone Simpson sued supplement manufacturer Dynamic Life Nutrition for $8m after both popped positives which they blamed on supplements. The case was settled out of court.
And another one of these: UFC fighter Yoel Romero popped a positive for Ibutamoren in 2016 and served six months on the naughty step after convincing USADA that it was a tainted supplement that caused his positive. In May he won a lawsuit against Gold Star Performance Products, the makers of the supplement. He was award $27.45 million: $3m for lost income; $3m for reputation damage; $3m for emotional harm; all three trebled under New Jersey's Consumer Fraud Act because Gold Star was found to have committed consumer fraud.

From the report linked above:
Given the relatively small scope of Gold Star Performance Products compared to supplement industry leaders, it remains to be seen what percentage of the $27.45 million Romero will receive before the company is devoid of cashflow and assets and forced to file for bankruptcy.
 
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