General Doping Thread.

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There's no such thing as a backdated TUE. ISTUE allows you 5 days after being notified of an AAF to apply for an rTUE. It depends when the courier delivered the AAF to her really and what TUE pool she was subject to. Typically included with the AAF notification are the requirements to apply for a retroactive TUE.
 
And the good news from the Times article:
The rules on retroactive TUEs have changed since 2012. Because there were concerns that international federations could abuse the system, Wada made an amendment to its latest 2021 code which means it is the only body that can grant a retroactive TUE.
But...
However the circumstances in which one can be granted have not changed, with the Wada code stating that the use of an otherwise prohibited, performance-enhancing substance such as salbutamol must be for "emergency treatment" or when "treatment of an acute medical condition was necessary". Wada justifies immediate administration when failure to do so "could significantly put the athlete's health at risk". Storey, who is 43 and was made a dame a few months after the London Games, has confirmed to The Times via her lawyer that a retroactive TUE was granted because she was "slightly above" the permitted limit for salbutamol. She stressed that she had been diagnosed with asthma as a child.
 
I don't even think the rTUE requirements stipulate it has to be emergency or acute. The terms used when Salbutomol is needed is simply for the exacerbation of asthma. For other substances, emergency/acute terms are used however.
 
Funny how so many of our great athletes have asthma. No longer the thing that holds kids back eh?
Before anyone points out that cyclists suffer from sport-induced asthma, Storey says she's had the condition since childhood. So, yeah, the stereotype of the dorky kid who can't even climb the stairs without a puffer is somewhat challenged by cycling's superstars.

While watching the Talking Shite show on GCN the other day I was shaken from my slumber by one of the presenters coughing loudly when still miked up and when I looked up it was Wiggins. Even off the bike he clearly still gets a bit chesty come Giro-time.
 
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Before anyone points out that cyclists suffer from sport-induced asthma, Storey says she's had the condition since childhood. So, yeah, the stereotype of the dorky kid who can't even climb the stairs without a puffer is somewhat challenged by cycling's superstars.

While watching the Talking Shite show on GCN the other day I was shaken from my slumber by one of the presenters coughing loudly when still miked up and when I looked up it was Wiggins. Even off the bike he clearly still gets a bit chesty come Giro-time.
that's the fags....
 
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"City Real" :laughing:
Before anyone points out that cyclists suffer from sport-induced asthma, Storey says she's had the condition since childhood. So, yeah, the stereotype of the dorky kid who can't even climb the stairs without a puffer is somewhat challenged by cycling's superstars.

While watching the Talking Shite show on GCN the other day I was shaken from my slumber by one of the presenters coughing loudly when still miked up and when I looked up it was Wiggins. Even off the bike he clearly still gets a bit chesty come Giro-time.
Well, try looking in the XC skiing thread. Almost the entire Norwegian cross-country team is apparently asthmatic, and some of those that aren't take pre-meditative doses of asthma medication through nebulisers on the top floor of their waxing truck "for when I experience asthma-like symptoms". Just waiting for a rival athlete to feel symptoms similar to kidney disease, suggesting the only logical course of action is a preventative course of EPO...

However, in fairness, you mention Storey, there's also Callum Skinner to point to. Whether he is clean or doping, the way he responded to his name being in the Fancy Bears leak is what you would hope for and expect from a clean athlete. He responded angrily and incredulously that he was being linked to TUEs, followed by providing evidence dating back to childhood of asthma proving that there was a completely legit reason for him to be prescribed what he was being prescribed. Of course, that then begs the question why others didn't, but that's not Skinner's fault, he did what he felt he had to do to clear his name and, by and large, was successful in doing so.
 
However, in fairness, you mention Storey, there's also Callum Skinner to point to.
At least in Storey's case the Fancy Bears reveal appears to have scared her straight, at least where back-dated TUEs are concerned:
"I had a TUE for asthma medication prior to 2009, when the requirements changed, and then again after the London individual pursuit," she said. "I have had no further retroactive TUEs, although this could be because I'm very aware, and sadly less inclined, to use my inhaler given the way retroactive TUEs have been portrayed by the press."
And I've no idea how the misquote happened, I must have pressed a wrong button somewhere. I'll go with the Freeman defence and claim Shane Sutton made me do it.
 
At least in Storey's case the Fancy Bears reveal appears to have scared her straight, at least where back-dated TUEs are concerned:

And I've no idea how the misquote happened, I must have pressed a wrong button somewhere. I'll go with the Freeman defence and claim Shane Sutton made me do it.
It's scared all of cycling. What was it last year? 6 TUEs across all of CADF TUE Pool? Several team Doctors have said, the fear of reputational damage with a TUE against your name is of more concern now than even the medical consequences racing with sickness and injury! As we saw with Pinot, he raced with his injured back for several months instead of a TUE and cortico injection. His delayed medical intervention during the season is still causing him issues 6 months later all because of a crash in first few days of Tour he refused to use a TUE to treat and didn't get Corticos until November!
 
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"City Real" :laughing:

Well, try looking in the XC skiing thread. Almost the entire Norwegian cross-country team is apparently asthmatic, and some of those that aren't take pre-meditative doses of asthma medication through nebulisers on the top floor of their waxing truck "for when I experience asthma-like symptoms". Just waiting for a rival athlete to feel symptoms similar to kidney disease, suggesting the only logical course of action is a preventative course of EPO...

However, in fairness, you mention Storey, there's also Callum Skinner to point to. Whether he is clean or doping, the way he responded to his name being in the Fancy Bears leak is what you would hope for and expect from a clean athlete. He responded angrily and incredulously that he was being linked to TUEs, followed by providing evidence dating back to childhood of asthma proving that there was a completely legit reason for him to be prescribed what he was being prescribed. Of course, that then begs the question why others didn't, but that's not Skinner's fault, he did what he felt he had to do to clear his name and, by and large, was successful in doing so.
I'll take Skinner at his word, and not just because he makes a decent coffee.
 
What an incredibly naive, and in fact irresponsible article. She just states the story as though it’s fact that athletes who claim their positive test results were from contmaminated supplements, medicines, and steak (;) ) of course must be telling the truth because . . . They said so?! Why does The NY Times publish this—and put it in the Opinion section where comments don’t get posted? It’s a minor blip in the larger scheme of things—but it should be no surprise that millions of Americans buy all sorts of invalid (or ridiculous) statements by anyone saying, “Nope, it didn’t happen.” Sorryif it’s behind a paywall:

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/05/13/opinion/brenda-martinez-doping-depression-olympics.html?referringSource=articleShare
 
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What an incredibly naive, and in fact irresponsible article. She just states the story as though it’s fact that athletes who claim their positive test results were from contmaminated supplements, medicines, and steak (;) ) of course must be telling the truth because . . . They said so?! Why does The NY Times publish this—and put it in the Opinion section where comments don’t get posted? It’s a minor blip in the larger scheme of things—but it should be no surprise that millions of Americans buy all sorts of invalid (or ridiculous) statements by anyone saying, “Nope, it didn’t happen.” Sorryif it’s behind a paywall:

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/05/13/opinion/brenda-martinez-doping-depression-olympics.html?referringSource=articleShare
I’m not sure how Europeans felt about LA before he came clean but here in the US all news is narrative driven and people pretty much believe whatever they’re told, so people tend to be pretty naive about doping here and as you can see this article certainly isn’t reliable.
 
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OMG! Doping made it into Popbitch! Doping be so cool! Thank you to the decadent and depraved Kentucky Derby!
>> Horseshit <<

How to get away with redrum

Horse racing has the best excuses. When the winner of last weekend's Kentucky Derby failed its post-race drugs test, the blame was initially dumped at the feet of a stable worker. Supposedly suffering from Covid, they claimed he had taken a bunch of cough syrup, pissed on some hay in the stable which the horse then ate, innocently contaminating itself with steroids.

The excuse has been refined a little now that there's a legal challenge in the offing. The story now is that drugs got into its system because of a misapplication of horse eczema ointment on his hind quarters.

It's not just horses. Jockeys get away with this sort of stuff too. Oisin Murphy failed a cocaine test last year, but managed to convince a tribunal that he must have been contaminated passively by having sex with a cocaine user the night before.

These sorts of outlandish excuses are thought to stem from the experience of French tennis star Richard Gasquet a few years back, who managed to convince sport authorities that his positive cocaine test (3x higher than Murphy's) was merely the result of kissing someone in a nightclub.

Which is why the excuse strand is known around industry circles as "Blowing a Gasquet".
 
I know it's Clinic policy to not let the threads cross as that'd be bad but the Storey/Freeman stories are doing just that with the MoS's latest: Ex-British Cycling doctors at odds over drug exemption for Britain's most-successful female Paralympian Sarah Storey
Dr Richard Freeman, a British Cycling doctor at the time who did not attend those Games, has told this newspaper that his boss at the time, professor Steve Peters, then British Cycling’s head of medicine, asked him to fill in some forms relating to the application. [...]‘I wasn’t even at the Paralympics but Steve Peters instructed me to get involved in this TUE,’ says Freeman.
In a case of the foxes guarding the hen-house, it turns out that BC/Sky's monkey-spanking specialist was on a UKAD panel of experts charged with approving TUEs:
Peters, at that time, was on the UK Anti-Doping (UKAD) panel of TUE experts who would decide on whether a TUE should be issued. UKAD have confirmed this, adding that on this occasion, UKAD had no specific role in this Games certificate. The British Paralympic Association insist Storey’s TUE was above board.
BC's internal investigation into the earlier in-house anti-doping programme story offers a fan-favourite call-back - laptops:
Peters has not answered a question sent by the MoS over whether he has been helping British Cycling with their inquiries. Freeman feels unable to cooperate with British Cycling because the latter still have possession of one of his laptops on which most of his records are stored, and are refusing to return it to him.

It is understood Freeman has had some contact with WADA’s intelligence and investigations department, and wants to share everything he knows about what happened at British Cycling and at Team Sky when he worked there, from 2009 to 2017.
 
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I LOVE the comments on the continuing story of Baffert/Medina. NY Times readers seem to think doping only happens in horse racing and cycling...

Can't believe people think doping isn't happening in many/most sports, including American football.
Most people think LeBum is just "a freak athlete" who spends 1M a year "on his body"...
 
Most people think LeBum is just "a freak athlete" who spends 1M a year "on his body"...
I'm thinking you mean LeBron? If so...I don't think I'd even have the nerve to bring up doping with NBA fans. Those people really are engaging in some next-level idolatry.

Football, yeah, I'd bring up doping with NFL fans, just to see how they'd explain away dozens and dozens of 330 pound humans being that fast...
 
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The whole Tom D stepping away only to come back a few months later and immediately crush TTs beating guys like Stefan Kung and winning national champs seems a bit eyebrow raising to me…
 

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