General Doping Thread.

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NFL player Taylor Lewan also blamed a supplement after testing positive for ostarine.
Yes and that was Robbie Cano's defense for his first, 80 game MLB claiming it was a supplement from his home country. Today he got a 1 year ban for Stanizlol or some other bargain basement roid that every gym rat could dodge a positive. He's 38 and kissing $24 meeeeelion US dollars away on next year's contract. Hope he banked something in his career up to this date.
That dough is enough to fund 3 Pro Tour teams in this economy by the way.
 
Yes and that was Robbie Cano's defense for his first, 80 game MLB claiming it was a supplement from his home country. Today he got a 1 year ban for Stanizlol or some other bargain basement roid that every gym rat could dodge a positive. He's 38 and kissing $24 meeeeelion US dollars away on next year's contract. Hope he banked something in his career up to this date.
That dough is enough to fund 3 Pro Tour teams in this economy by the way.
I guess this explains that slash line...

I saw a breakdown recently on how much of that contract they actually get (although I think it as basketball) and I've always wondered why the take home pay isn't reported. He's had $214m in contracts and is due another $48m (I don't know if there are options on his contract, Baseball-Reference seems to indicate not), so you'd hope he would be fine. That's HoF gone though I think.
 
I guess this explains that slash line...

I saw a breakdown recently on how much of that contract they actually get (although I think it as basketball) and I've always wondered why the take home pay isn't reported. He's had $214m in contracts and is due another $48m (I don't know if there are options on his contract, Baseball-Reference seems to indicate not), so you'd hope he would be fine. That's HoF gone though I think.
Yeah, I think he stands a little behind Bonds and MaGuire for Cooperstown. Maybe they should open a steroid annex and call it C**perstown.
 
Dutch fed (KNWU) concealed EPO positive in 2011 allowing rider to retire without publicising his ban.

Edit: CN's report.
Technical director of the KNWU at the time, Thorwald Veneberg, confirmed the rider's account of the situation. "This assessment was made at the time by the then-director," he told Wielerflits. "He informed me about it at the time. It was an extremely difficult and sad period for the person involved. The rider had confidential consultations with the director on the matter. He decided – exceptionally – not to publish it because of personal circumstances and because the rider stopped cycling."
 
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Rules is rules. If KNWU didn't follow the rules and notify both UCI and WADA then that's a problem. If the rules required the rider's name to be made public, even if only on a list buried on the KNWU website such as used the the UCI, then the KNWU should have followed the rules and made the name public, even if only on a list buried on the KNWU website. Secret suspensions undermine anti-doping, no matter how underwhelming the rider in question's profile and how little traction news of his suspension at the time would have gained. The cover-up is always worse than the crime.
 
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Yes and that was Robbie Cano's defense for his first, 80 game MLB claiming it was a supplement from his home country. Today he got a 1 year ban for Stanizlol or some other bargain basement roid that every gym rat could dodge a positive. He's 38 and kissing $24 meeeeelion US dollars away on next year's contract. Hope he banked something in his career up to this date.
That dough is enough to fund 3 Pro Tour teams in this economy by the way.
We were discussing Cano's new positive on a baseball forum, and someone contrasted it to cycling. The poster pointed out that LA hired Ferrari to help him not simply dope, but--and this is where doctors really earn their pay, or not--avoid testing positive. Making one wonder why Cano, with all his wealth, didn't pay someone to advise him, who surely, at a minimum, would have told him, don't take stanzolol, it remains in the body for a long time and is easily identified on routine screening. It was probably popular with MLB players in the 90s and early 00s, but when MLB finally got serious, or semi-serious, about doping, most of them stopped taking it, or at least have avoided getting caught. There have been a few positives for it in recent years, but all pitchers--who believe it helps their endurance, go deeper into games--and Cano is the first big name.

But the penalties for getting caught are more severe in cycling. Cano is getting suspended for one year, about half the minimum for a cyclist, but this is his second offense. If it had been his first, it would have been half a season. That explains some of the other positives. They are young players, not making that much, and whatever they lose in salary, they more than get back in a larger contract if their performance is boosted. That doesn't apply to Cano, who had three more years on his contract, and you would think would be retiring after that. So this is an unusually dumb move. He presumably thought he could take it safely in the offseason.

That's HoF gone though I think.
Oh, for sure. His comp now is Manny Ramirez, a much better hitter than Cano, who would have been a certain HOFer, and also got caught twice.
 
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Oh, for sure. His comp now is Manny Ramirez, a much better hitter than Cano, who would have been a certain HOFer, and also got caught twice.
I still feel a little sorry for these guys (not just because Manny helped break the curse!) but at the time Manny was caught I'm pretty sure they were being tested twice a year and the dates were basically known (one was spring training, can't remember when the other was). I know it was a case of a few getting caught with loads slipping the net, hence while I feel a little sorry for them, but get caught under that testing regime and it's hard to feel much sympathy.
 
We were discussing Cano's new positive on a baseball forum, and someone contrasted it to cycling. The poster pointed out that LA hired Ferrari to help him not simply dope, but--and this is where doctors really earn their pay, or not--avoid testing positive. Making one wonder why Cano, with all his wealth, didn't pay someone to advise him, who surely, at a minimum, would have told him, don't take stanzolol, it remains in the body for a long time and is easily identified on routine screening. It was probably popular with MLB players in the 90s and early 00s, but when MLB finally got serious, or semi-serious, about doping, most of them stopped taking it, or at least have avoided getting caught. There have been a few positives for it in recent years, but all pitchers--who believe it helps their endurance, go deeper into games--and Cano is the first big name.

But the penalties for getting caught are more severe in cycling. Cano is getting suspended for one year, about half the minimum for a cyclist, but this is his second offense. If it had been his first, it would have been half a season. That explains some of the other positives. They are young players, not making that much, and whatever they lose in salary, they more than get back in a larger contract if their performance is boosted. That doesn't apply to Cano, who had three more years on his contract, and you would think would be retiring after that. So this is an unusually dumb move. He presumably thought he could take it safely in the offseason.


Oh, for sure. His comp now is Manny Ramirez, a much better hitter than Cano, who would have been a certain HOFer, and also got caught twice.
IMO Cano's outcome is a lifetime ban as you noted since he's older and toxic now. 3 more years is $75mil plus lost endorsements so it's more on the extreme side compared to cycling. Generally though; MLB slaps a wrist because they need their stars like the NFL who levy ridiculously light suspensions for chronic PED abuse. Re: Cano's drug of choice, stanozolol; the LOL at the end of the drug supports your comment about having better doping strategy. That's a old school gym drug and he should be able to do better. When he played for the Mariners everyone was waiting for a shoe to drop....
 
3 more years is $75mil plus lost endorsements
He's only losing one year and $24 million. I doubt he has any endorsements to lose, I assume that if he had any in the past, they would have been terminated when he tested positive the first time. People here may be thinking in terms of cycling, where if a rider tests positive, he's immediately fired by his team. MLB players aren't, my understanding is that they can't be, per the Collective Bargaining Agreement.

Also, by the terms of the deal that traded him to the Mets from the Mariners, Seattle paid almost $4 million of his salary. I don't think they get that money back.
 
He's only losing one year and $24 million. I doubt he has any endorsements to lose, I assume that if he had any in the past, they would have been terminated when he tested positive the first time. People here may be thinking in terms of cycling, where if a rider tests positive, he's immediately fired by his team. MLB players aren't, my understanding is that they can't be, per the Collective Bargaining Agreement.

Also, by the terms of the deal that traded him to the Mets from the Mariners, Seattle paid almost $4 million of his salary. I don't think they get that money back.
Unless Cano's contract had something specific about another PED test. Unless his final year is guaranteed he still has to pass a physical and be in playing shape, doesn't he? Mind you; no need to shed a tear for him but the scale of penalty on pure dollars is breathtaking. It'd take me a few weeks to make that much. Somewhere above 6,000 of them....
 
He has a 10 year, $240m guaranteed contract. I doubt he has a clause that’ll allow the Mets to fire him, he just doesn’t get paid during the suspension. He used to have quite a few endorsements, but no idea if he does now or if he’s lost any due to this.
 
Mind you; no need to shed a tear for him but the scale of penalty on pure dollars is breathtaking.
He lost $12 million in salary from the first suspension, too. And at that time, he seems to have been making $3 million/year in endorsements. If he lost all those, that would be another $9 million till now. So $45 million lost because of two positives. All when he had a guaranteed contract, and didn't have to worry about the (financial) repercussions of a decline in performance.
 
He lost $12 million in salary from the first suspension, too. And at that time, he seems to have been making $3 million/year in endorsements. If he lost all those, that would be another $9 million till now. So $45 million lost because of two positives. All when he had a guaranteed contract, and didn't have to worry about the (financial) repercussions of a decline in performance.
Well lucky for him he can sit on the bench for 2 years and pocket $48mil. That is definitely less harsh than a cycling 4-year ban with no pay.
 
Here is a link to a series of radio programmes in the UK about the Russian doping. About 15 mins per episode, not sure of any restrictions for non UK people.

Ah yes, the old 'look at the Russians and their doping' stories again. More propaganda by the BBC. Can't wait for more reports from NYT and ARD.
 
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