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General Doping Thread.

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so, the backdated full suspension given to Stannard is UCI admitting they fckd up his whole passport anomalies (which were present by the way) but since it was their fault in taking 6 years to come to the end of the investigation, they decided to give a full backdated suspension?
 
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The chinese swimmers doping scandal rumbles on ...
https://www.theguardian.com/sport/a...ptical-of-investigation-into-chinese-swimmers
Travis Tygart, the head of the United States Anti-Doping Agency (Usada), said on Monday he has doubts about the effectiveness of an investigation into positive drug tests by 23 Chinese swimmers.

The World Anti-Doping Agency (Wada) has faced mounting pressure to explain how Chinese swimmers tested positive for a banned substance weeks before the Tokyo Olympics but escaped punishment, with some going on to win gold medals.

A report by Swiss prosecutor Eric Cottier looking into whether proper procedures were followed by anti-doping and swimming officials is expected to be made public on Tuesday but Tygart called the investigation “more of a self-serving check the box type of exercise”.
 
If USADA is so against doping, why do they allow NBA players and NCAA athletes to compete in the Olympics? None of them have legitimate anti-doping tests by WADA/USADA, just so-called in-house tests.

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Apparently there is new evidence in the case where Pantani was ejected from the 1999 Giro .
The evidence revolves around a Mafia betting syndicate that paid to have Marco DSQ'ed.
In italiano
 
Apparently there is new evidence in the case where Pantani was ejected from the 1999 Giro .
The evidence revolves around a Mafia betting syndicate that paid to have Marco DSQ'ed.
In italiano
Back in 2014 ...
https://velo.outsideonline.com/road/italian-mafia-forced-pantani-to-lose-1999-giro/
Original article in Italian -
https://www.gazzetta.it/Ciclismo/18-10-2014/pantani-storia-senso-nuove-inchieste-90774734738.shtml
 
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I thought I'd put this question here even though it might not necessarily be Clinic related.

I saw a video by Cedrik Bakke Christophersen (former triathlete and member of TDT - Unibet) on Youtube about heat training which is a low power workout done while raising the core temperature to say 39 degrees C by either wearing lots of thick layers of clothes or heating the actual room you are excersising in. This has apparently become popular among pro cyclists in the past number of years. Does anyone know how long this has been popular?

One thing he mentions in the video is that this type of training even gives you better blood values so I assume it sort of has a similar effect to something like altitude training? Does anyone know if this is actually true and if so how much of an effect could it possibly have?

I know in terms of clinic issues one question is how the best riders now can race faster than the doped riders of the past. Could new techniques like this or other similar things be the answer to something like that? Has the sport found "natural" ways to give similar effects that doping gave in the past?
 
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I thought I'd put this question here even though it might not necessarily be Clinic related.

I saw a video by Cedrik Bakke Christophersen (former triathlete and member of TDT - Unibet) on Youtube about heat training which is a low power workout done while raising the core temperature to say 39 degrees C by either wearing lots of thick layers of clothes or heating the actual room you are excersising in. This has apparently become popular among pro cyclists in the past number of years. Does anyone know how long this has been popular?

One thing he mentions in the video is that this type of training even gives you better blood values so I assume it sort of has a similar effect to something like altitude training? Does anyone know if this is actually true and if so how much of an effect could it possibly have?

I know in terms of clinic issues one question is how the best riders now can race faster than the doped riders of the past. Could new techniques like this or other similar things be the answer to something like that? Has the sport found "natural" ways to give similar effects that doping gave in the past?
Maybe there is something similar to the ideas about “hot yoga” decreasing toxins and decreasing inflammation. That doesn’t typically do anything for HCT though.
The trouble with reporting on methods such as this is that there are no good controls for other variables and no large body of peer-reviewed literature. There are multiple dozens of research on hypoxia at altitude effect on HCT, and there are hundreds (if not thousands) of reports on EPO’s effectiveness.
So it’s possible the above method works but there is already more research on effectiveness of the coming doping method—marine lugworms—than on “hot training.”
 
Jul 21, 2022
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Anyone here have a subscription ? He’s obviously had enough with pro cycling, so probably not more than a sentence or two.

 
"Cycling is evolving so much, I must say," Pogačar said. "Six years ago, when I came to this team, and I don't want to speak bad about the team, it was totally different. If I compare this year to my first year in Vuelta, it was almost amateur. Back then, I thought everything was professional, but we moved on really fast. Every team pushes each other with technology, with nutrition, with training plans, with altitude camps. Especially Visma and UAE, and Ineos and Trek and QuickStep, we push each other to reach new limits.

"Yesterday, we witnessed the fastest-ever climbing and we should be seeing something like this every year because everybody is focusing so much on the details – every single gram of the food, every single watt you can save on the bike. We are going super fast. For me, it's really impressive to see how things changed in the last six years of my professional career."
 
I thought I'd put this question here even though it might not necessarily be Clinic related.

I saw a video by Cedrik Bakke Christophersen (former triathlete and member of TDT - Unibet) on Youtube about heat training which is a low power workout done while raising the core temperature to say 39 degrees C by either wearing lots of thick layers of clothes or heating the actual room you are excersising in. This has apparently become popular among pro cyclists in the past number of years. Does anyone know how long this has been popular?

One thing he mentions in the video is that this type of training even gives you better blood values so I assume it sort of has a similar effect to something like altitude training? Does anyone know if this is actually true and if so how much of an effect could it possibly have?

I know in terms of clinic issues one question is how the best riders now can race faster than the doped riders of the past. Could new techniques like this or other similar things be the answer to something like that? Has the sport found "natural" ways to give similar effects that doping gave in the past?
It's a pretty old technique, boxers used to use it a lot. It's fairly well understood too. It increased total blood plasma volume, although the studies on it show you really should only do about 30 minutes, after that you get greatly diminishing returns and after an hour or so it's actually bad and your plasma levels start to decrease.
 
"Cycling is evolving so much, I must say," Pogačar said. "Six years ago, when I came to this team, and I don't want to speak bad about the team, it was totally different. If I compare this year to my first year in Vuelta, it was almost amateur. Back then, I thought everything was professional, but we moved on really fast. Every team pushes each other with technology, with nutrition, with training plans, with altitude camps. Especially Visma and UAE, and Ineos and Trek and QuickStep, we push each other to reach new limits.

"Yesterday, we witnessed the fastest-ever climbing and we should be seeing something like this every year because everybody is focusing so much on the details – every single gram of the food, every single watt you can save on the bike. We are going super fast. For me, it's really impressive to see how things changed in the last six years of my professional career."

A doper would never lie.

View: https://youtu.be/ioLXqusbRGo?si=x7l1ygNCSBNOGZsE&t=67
 
I thought I'd put this question here even though it might not necessarily be Clinic related.

I saw a video by Cedrik Bakke Christophersen (former triathlete and member of TDT - Unibet) on Youtube about heat training which is a low power workout done while raising the core temperature to say 39 degrees C by either wearing lots of thick layers of clothes or heating the actual room you are excersising in. This has apparently become popular among pro cyclists in the past number of years. Does anyone know how long this has been popular?

One thing he mentions in the video is that this type of training even gives you better blood values so I assume it sort of has a similar effect to something like altitude training? Does anyone know if this is actually true and if so how much of an effect could it possibly have?

I know in terms of clinic issues one question is how the best riders now can race faster than the doped riders of the past. Could new techniques like this or other similar things be the answer to something like that? Has the sport found "natural" ways to give similar effects that doping gave in the past?
5-8% in this study. By the way both Remco and Lotto have Youtube vids on heat training. I've done it and found no improvement, so take it with a grain of salt.

 
5-8% in this study. By the way both Remco and Lotto have Youtube vids on heat training. I've done it and found no improvement, so take it with a grain of salt.

This study only has 20 subjects (8 as control) so doesn’t stand up on its own. But But glad you provided the link as I see there is more research on the subject than I realized. Similar too-small study found heat training improved performance in hot conditions but provided no benefit for competing in cool conditions:
 
the saddest and most demoralizing thing for me is that it would take so many years to find the dopers guilty...plus the UCI or whoever is in charge does not really want investigations to discover anything that would stain the sport...anyway that's my opinion.
 
Is Carbon Monoxide (CO) rebreathing nonsense?





I mean, seems like a decent evidence basis within 2 minutes of searching.
 



I mean, seems like a decent evidence basis within 2 minutes of searching.
A different method of creating hypoxia I guess. Soon we’ll see them on their indoor trainers with plastic bags cinched around their heads
 
the saddest and most demoralizing thing for me is that it would take so many years to find the dopers guilty...plus the UCI or whoever is in charge does not really want investigations to discover anything that would stain the sport...anyway that's my opinion.
Unless the gendarmes get involved in raiding and investigating (and I think teams are much more watchful to avoid that possibility) it doesn’t seem like testing or passport will uncover much.
 
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