General Doping Thread.

Page 8 - Get up to date with the latest news, scores & standings from the Cycling News Community.
Oct 10, 2015
479
0
0
Those numbers are pretty compelling, although I'm not sure exactly what they tell us.

Are most riders simply no longer in need of extra-help?

Are they finding more effective ways to bypass the system altogether?

It would also be interesting to know how many TUE requests were made, but not granted.
(Besides the dozen or so presumably put forward by Chris Horner)
 
Jacques de Molay said:
Just noticed this on the UCI site. Interesting.
http://www.uci.ch/clean-sport/therapeutic-use-exemptions/

8. Number of TUEs annually granted by the UCI

Year - TUEs granted

2009 - 239
2010 - 97
2011 - 56
2012 - 47
2013 - 30
2014 - 24
Very curious. Norvo Nordisk had 17 riders in 2014, leaving 7 TUEs. Dowsett and his haemophilia leaves 6. Are there any other riders that need TUEs to compete safely? And I don't mean asthma.
 
42x16ss said:
Jacques de Molay said:
Just noticed this on the UCI site. Interesting.
http://www.uci.ch/clean-sport/therapeutic-use-exemptions/

8. Number of TUEs annually granted by the UCI

Year - TUEs granted

2009 - 239
2010 - 97
2011 - 56
2012 - 47
2013 - 30
2014 - 24
Very curious. Norvo Nordisk had 17 riders in 2014, leaving 7 TUEs. Dowsett and his haemophilia leaves 6. Are there any other riders that need TUEs to compete safely? And I don't mean asthma.
I can only assume that this is the number of new TUEs granted each year and that previously existing TUE's don't automatically expire annually. Otherwise this would mean that TUE's have been effectively abolished for riders without diabetes or haemophilia, which is surely something we'd have heard about. The first option would still indicate a tightening of the regime.
 
Oct 10, 2015
479
0
0
Zinoviev Letter said:
I can only assume that this is the number of new TUEs granted each year and that previously existing TUE's don't automatically expire annually.
Not so. I just looked into that.
http://www.uci.ch/mm/Document/News/CleanSport/16/80/69/2015.01.01.UCITUERegulations_Neutral.pdf
6.12

Each TUE will have a specified duration, as decided by the TUEC [TUE Committee], at the end of which the TUE will expire automatically. If the Rider needs to continue to Use the Prohibited Substance or Prohibited Method after the expiry date, he/she must submit an application for a new TUE well in advance of that expiry date, so that there is sufficient time for a decision to be made on the application before the expiry date.
6.16

In the event that, after his/her TUE is granted, the Rider requires a materially different dosage, frequency, route or duration of Administration of the Prohibited Substance or Prohibited Method to that specified in the TUE, he/she must apply for a new TUE. If the presence, Use, Possession or Administration of the Prohibited Substance or Prohibited Method is not consistent with the terms of the TUE granted, the fact that the Rider has the TUE will not prevent the finding of an anti-doping rule violation.
If that's the case, then how to explain such a dramatic drop in TUE's over the years?
Or an even better question: Why hasn't the UCI/WADA made more noise about this reduction? Wouldn't less TUEs equate to a "cleaner" sport on some level, at least from a PR standpoint?
 
Mar 13, 2009
16,856
0
0
Jacques de Molay said:
Those numbers are pretty compelling, although I'm not sure exactly what they tell us.

Are most riders simply no longer in need of extra-help?

Are they finding more effective ways to bypass the system altogether?

It would also be interesting to know how many TUE requests were made, but not granted.
(Besides the dozen or so presumably put forward by Chris Horner)
game theory would indicate to me, they just subverted the ruling by finding new methods and pathways.. SSDD, just cant use the TUE method...
 
Mar 13, 2009
16,856
0
0
42x16ss said:
Jacques de Molay said:
Just noticed this on the UCI site. Interesting.
http://www.uci.ch/clean-sport/therapeutic-use-exemptions/

8. Number of TUEs annually granted by the UCI

Year - TUEs granted

2009 - 239
2010 - 97
2011 - 56
2012 - 47
2013 - 30
2014 - 24
Very curious. Norvo Nordisk had 17 riders in 2014, leaving 7 TUEs. Dowsett and his haemophilia leaves 6. Are there any other riders that need TUEs to compete safely? And I don't mean asthma.
thats his hemophilia that Joe Papp almost died of when he was in the amateurs in Italy when some soigneur was pinning him with all manna of drugs, and one was the blood viscosity one...
 
Mar 13, 2009
16,856
0
0
Jacques de Molay said:
Those numbers are pretty compelling, although I'm not sure exactly what they tell us.

Are most riders simply no longer in need of extra-help?

Are they finding more effective ways to bypass the system altogether?

It would also be interesting to know how many TUE requests were made, but not granted.
(Besides the dozen or so presumably put forward by Chris Horner)
the other thing one could deduce, if the amount of race days was equivalent and the sample size equivalent,

going from 239 to 24 indicates either the peloton got a whole lot healthier, they had alternate legal homeotheraphies or pharmacies, or 215 of the TUEs were under the mask of the therapeutic when really for the P in PED.

I reckon the latter.
 
Leading South African mountain biker Rourke Croeser has been charged with an anti-doping rule violation due to a positive test for Erythropoietin (EPO). The athlete’s B-sample also confirmed the presence of EPO.

http://www.drugfreesport.org.za/sa-mountain-biker-tests-positive-for-epo/


If you recall this is the guy who was "cleared" when syringes were found in his luggage.

As for ban duration:
Mr Croeser’s hearing will be conducted in the new year.
 

Irondan

Administrator
Moderator
Re:

Catwhoorg said:
http://www.usada.org/robert-lea-accepts-doping-sanction/

USADA announced today that a three-member panel of the American Arbitration Association North American Court of Arbitration for Sport (AAA), rendered its decision in the case of cyclist Robert Lea, finding that Lea committed an anti-doping rule violation, and will serve a 16-month suspension.

Oxycodone

Full decision:
http://www.usada.org/wp-content/uploads/USADA-Bobby-Lea-Modified-Operative-Interim-Award-12-15-15.pdf
Anyone that gets caught riding their bike on Oxycodone should get charged with Operating under the influence, by a criminal court. Robert's lucky that all he got was a ban from competition.
 
Jun 4, 2015
499
0
0
42x16ss said:
Jacques de Molay said:
Just noticed this on the UCI site. Interesting.
http://www.uci.ch/clean-sport/therapeutic-use-exemptions/

8. Number of TUEs annually granted by the UCI

Year - TUEs granted

2009 - 239
2010 - 97
2011 - 56
2012 - 47
2013 - 30
2014 - 24
Very curious. Norvo Nordisk had 17 riders in 2014, leaving 7 TUEs. Dowsett and his haemophilia leaves 6. Are there any other riders that need TUEs to compete safely? And I don't mean asthma.

Agreed, this is a bit strange. Judging by the all illnesses they claim to have, the peleton must be, statistically, on average, the sickest bunch of young men on the planet. Therefore with only 24 TUEs granted, I'm surprised most of them can turn up for work, or even get out of bed.

Or they've found something new.

Or the figures are BS, as everyone seems to at least have asthma (sorry).

I recon it's BS
 
http://www.blearacing.com/an-open-letter-to-cycling/

Lea's Statement

He is appealing to CAS.
"At the end of the day, I made a mistake and that was wrong. I know that as an athlete, I am accountable for everything that I ingest, regardless of the source. I live with my mistake and I accept full responsibility for it. To my family, friends, coach, fans, sponsors, and the sport that I love: I am deeply sorry. I remain committed to the strict rules and ethics that govern track cycling and Olympic Sport and I support any and all anti-doping efforts that help better it. However, because I want to end my career on the track and not in a lawyer’s conference room, I will appeal this sanction to the Court of Arbitration for Sport."
 
May 22, 2011
146
0
0
Narcotic doping puzzles me. There has been an undercurrent of thought in the peloton that extensive use of the painkiller Tramadol (actually technically NOT a narcotic as the chemical structure is different from morphine, heroin, etc.) is causing a rash of crashes. in the US Tramadol is scheduled as a category 4 controlled substance since it is felt that there is limited potential for abuse or addiction.

As a physician (Anesthesia and Critical Care Medicine) I evaluate patients all of the time who take prescription narcotics. Most have legitimate need to use these substances, some do not. The ones who don't are a different breed in terms of their behavior. Patients who abuse Tramadol are very difficult to take care of as they have (IMHO) an "edge" about them. They are very jittery and react strangely to stimuli and surgical operative stress. I am guessing that Tramadol helps dull muscle pain in pro cycling and has become popular in the peloton for this reason. I can't imagine what it does to ones judgement.

It's one thing to be on opioids to deal with an abscessed tooth or to treat pain from cancer metastasis so an individual can get through their daily activities without undue suffering. It is another realm altogether to take Tramadol in a very big field of aggressive athletes sprinting for a stage win !
 
Matteo Rabbotini aims to return 6 may 2016 - see the Gazzetta
http://www.gazzetta.it/Ciclismo/06-01-2016/rabottini-una-fiala-300-euro-sono-andato-inferno-140172449120.shtml

Sob story in brief: "One 300€ vial and I've been to hell"

I was desperate.
An ex Pro from East europe sold me the EPO.
I'm left only with my son - my parents have abandoned me.
I gave the names, now I want to begin again.
I have to pay €91K fine to get a licence.
I'll take out a loan.


Apparently he "confessed" over Skype with the UCI in Dec 2014
 
Mar 13, 2009
16,856
0
0
Re:

TourOfSardinia said:
Matteo Rabbotini aims to return 6 may 2016 - see the Gazzetta
http://www.gazzetta.it/Ciclismo/06-01-2016/rabottini-una-fiala-300-euro-sono-andato-inferno-140172449120.shtml

Sob story in brief: "One 300€ vial and I've been to hell"

I was desperate.
An ex Pro from East europe sold me the EPO.
I'm left only with my son - my parents have abandoned me.
I gave the names, now I want to begin again.
I have to pay €91K fine to get a licence.
I'll take out a loan.


Apparently he "confessed" over Skype with the UCI in Dec 2014
sounds like bullsh!t

the sport may have done him a favour by tossing him out. he was the scapegoat who was saved from the cesspool #Zeno'sParadox
 
Jan 15, 2013
1,129
0
0
Re:

arthurvandelay said:
As a physician (Anesthesia and Critical Care Medicine) I evaluate patients all of the time who take prescription narcotics. Most have legitimate need to use these substances, some do not. The ones who don't are a different breed in terms of their behavior. Patients who abuse Tramadol are very difficult to take care of as they have (IMHO) an "edge" about them. They are very jittery and react strangely to stimuli and surgical operative stress. I am guessing that Tramadol helps dull muscle pain in pro cycling and has become popular in the peloton for this reason. I can't imagine what it does to ones judgement.
Tramadol is not an opiate i.e. it's not a molecule of a certain shape extracted from poppies but it's an opioid - it has the same painkilling mechanism of action as opiates i.e. through the mu-opioid receptor.

What's odd about tramadol is that it has a second mechanism of action - it blocks serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake which is something more associated with antidepressants. I was given it after I went over the handlebars and broke my elbow into several pieces many years ago. I noticed a small but definite stimulant/anti-fatigue edge to it probably connected to the second mechanism.

So: allows you to push through the accumulated aches and niggles of a bike or especially stage race, plus an energy boost, plus legal -> damn right it's going to be abused.

What I don't get is that codeine is banned in-competition even though it's the same pain-killing strength as tramadol, with none of the weird stimulant/anti-depressant properties. Maybe it's because a small portion of codeine is converted to morphine in the liver, which would open the door to people taking morphine and saying they took codeine - you'd probably have to test for multiple metabolites to figure out what someone actually took.

Anyway tramadol is really old-school doping in a way - helps you push your limits a bit more, but doesn't actually change your abilities the way EPO or transfusions or AICAR would. It should probably be banned but in terms of cleaning up the sport it's pretty irrelevant compared to blood doping.
 
Jun 21, 2015
377
0
0
Re: Re:

vedrafjord said:
arthurvandelay said:
As a physician (Anesthesia and Critical Care Medicine) I evaluate patients all of the time who take prescription narcotics. Most have legitimate need to use these substances, some do not. The ones who don't are a different breed in terms of their behavior. Patients who abuse Tramadol are very difficult to take care of as they have (IMHO) an "edge" about them. They are very jittery and react strangely to stimuli and surgical operative stress. I am guessing that Tramadol helps dull muscle pain in pro cycling and has become popular in the peloton for this reason. I can't imagine what it does to ones judgement.
Tramadol is not an opiate i.e. it's not a molecule of a certain shape extracted from poppies but it's an opioid - it has the same painkilling mechanism of action as opiates i.e. through the mu-opioid receptor.

What's odd about tramadol is that it has a second mechanism of action - it blocks serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake which is something more associated with antidepressants. I was given it after I went over the handlebars and broke my elbow into several pieces many years ago. I noticed a small but definite stimulant/anti-fatigue edge to it probably connected to the second mechanism.

So: allows you to push through the accumulated aches and niggles of a bike or especially stage race, plus an energy boost, plus legal -> damn right it's going to be abused.

What I don't get is that codeine is banned in-competition even though it's the same pain-killing strength as tramadol, with none of the weird stimulant/anti-depressant properties. Maybe it's because a small portion of codeine is converted to morphine in the liver, which would open the door to people taking morphine and saying they took codeine - you'd probably have to test for multiple metabolites to figure out what someone actually took.

Anyway tramadol is really old-school doping in a way - helps you push your limits a bit more, but doesn't actually change your abilities the way EPO or transfusions or AICAR would. It should probably be banned but in terms of cleaning up the sport it's pretty irrelevant compared to blood doping.
My guess is that opioids are prohibited because of their euphoric effects, which could beneficially alter an athletes psychological perception of physical discomfort during extreme exertion. Didn't tour riders use alcohol for this reason, back in the day?
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS