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Giant v Colnago

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Bagster

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SlantParallelogram said:
What benefits? All the introduction of index shifting did was bring more Freds into cycling.

I would be equally happy using friction shifters on my downtube over shifters integrated into the brake levers. It would be way lighter.

If you don't think that Shimano used its larger size to push SunTour out of the market in a Microsoft like fashion then you are deluding yourself.

The one thing that Shimano did really well was advertise. Their advertising was all over, and the Freds and casual riders believed it.

Downtube shifters over STI levers?? Your'e kidding right!?...aren't you? Suppose you drive a Morry Minor too because its more soilid than these new fangled cars.:eek:

The only advantage the old tube shifters had over lever shifters was simplicity. The weight issue is totally irrelevant because bikes in general are 2-3 kg lighter than they were back in the day.

Regarding Shimano...you are comparing Shimano from years ago with a manufacturer who went out of business years ago. Regardless of any differences in equipment back then, in the big world of business Shimano was a better run company and captialised on that, hence they survived and thrived where others failed. Thats life. For reference in case I accused of being a Shimano fanboy, I use Campy on my bikes.

On another tangent. I bought my wife a bike with Sram Force on it. What a pain in the *** it is to get the back wheel off!!! Almost as bad as getting tyres onto Campy wheels!
 
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Bagster said:
Even more ironic is the fact that quite a number of the mid range Colnago's are made by Giant under licence. If you are ever in Taiwan you can get a tour through the factory. In the yard are containers of frames that Giant are making under licence, including Colnago. The Giant research area is bigger than most whole factories and I would be suprised if there are many other manufacturers that have frames as advanced. I think that Giant suffer from a bit of brand bigotry from the euro brigade And no, I don't ride a Giant! I ride a Cervelo and a Scott.

I have no argument with any of the above indeed I acknowledged Giant as a quality manufacturing company in my post. They clearly know what they're doing and have made a significant contribution to frame technology through their work with Mike Burrows and the compact frame. I've never ridden one of their frames but ride with several people who love their Giants. I do object to numpties who believe that since Colnago have been around for decades and construct their top end frames in Italy that their use of technology is somehow redundant or not up to modern race standards.
 
Jul 11, 2009
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While im not sure of all the details of the Giant/Colnago 'partnership' I have been told that it is effectively Giant who owns Colnago. Does this matter? I think it does if you belive marketing.

I think that you have to consider what "Made in X Country" means. For a bike to be made in spain it has to be 7% Spanish or 5% for Italy. This is why my Bottechia Ottavio has a made in Italy sticker when I know for a fact that Deda produces these frames in Taiwan.

Even if your frame is made in its claimed country the raw materials (carbon/resin) are being made by an Asian company. (With the exception of Time, who still draw their own carbon for their top models).

I don’t quite understand the "cheep Asian rubbish" attitude that exists. Carbon frames benefit greatly from large-scale production that Asian manufacture allows as as volumes increase they then invest in the best technology and machinery. When the quality is poor it is often because a western based company is constantly pressuring the manufacturer to make it cheaper, cheaper, cheaper. (this is cut and paste from another topic)

Also Campy is now making most of their components in Romania and other countries with lower labour rates. But you can still feel the 'passion' :p
 
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I was told over a year ago that everything except for Record groups and Carbon wheels were now produced or will soon be produced in Eastern Europe. I could be wrong I havnt really checked up my info. I certainly cant find any statement on the campy website but this statement gives some indication;

"Campagnolo S.r.l. designs, produces and distributes high-end components for racing bikes. It is present in over 30 countries with five branches and nine agencies. The main facility is located in Vicenza and employs about 690 workers"

Make of that what you want:rolleyes:

Not such a problem I like Eastern Europe.
 
53 x 11 said:
I was told over a year ago that everything except for Record groups and Carbon wheels were now produced or will soon be produced in Eastern Europe. I could be wrong I havnt really checked up my info. I certainly cant find any statement on the campy website but this statement gives some indication;

So that would be a no, you are not sure about it. Who told you anyway? Were they a reliable source? I haven't heard anything about it.
 
53 x 11 said:
While im not sure of all the details of the Giant/Colnago 'partnership' I have been told that it is effectively Giant who owns Colnago. Does this matter? I think it does if you belive marketing.

I think that you have to consider what "Made in X Country" means. For a bike to be made in spain it has to be 7% Spanish or 5% for Italy. This is why my Bottechia Ottavio has a made in Italy sticker when I know for a fact that Deda produces these frames in Taiwan.

Even if your frame is made in its claimed country the raw materials (carbon/resin) are being made by an Asian company. (With the exception of Time, who still draw their own carbon for their top models).

I don’t quite understand the "cheep Asian rubbish" attitude that exists. Carbon frames benefit greatly from large-scale production that Asian manufacture allows as as volumes increase they then invest in the best technology and machinery. When the quality is poor it is often because a western based company is constantly pressuring the manufacturer to make it cheaper, cheaper, cheaper. (this is cut and paste from another topic)

Also Campy is now making most of their components in Romania and other countries with lower labour rates. But you can still feel the 'passion' :p

Yes, lots of aluminum components and parts are manufactured in Eastern Europe to reduce labor costs. Most of the carbon 'stuff' is still made in Italy, final assembly of most is still in Vincenza.
 

Bagster

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LugHugger said:
I have no argument with any of the above indeed I acknowledged Giant as a quality manufacturing company in my post. They clearly know what they're doing and have made a significant contribution to frame technology through their work with Mike Burrows and the compact frame. I've never ridden one of their frames but ride with several people who love their Giants. I do object to numpties who believe that since Colnago have been around for decades and construct their top end frames in Italy that their use of technology is somehow redundant or not up to modern race standards.

Yep no disagreement from me on that.
 
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Bustedknuckle said:
Yes, lots of aluminum components and parts are manufactured in Eastern Europe to reduce labor costs. Most of the carbon 'stuff' is still made in Italy, final assembly of most is still in Vincenza.

This is in line with the information that I had from a local Campy rep.
 

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