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Giro d'Italia Giro d'Italia 2023, stage 16: Sabbio Chiese - Monte Bondone 203 km

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Yes.

People loved Dumoulin even though his transformation was the exact same and he also never attacked apart from one time on Oropa. I guess he wasn't British, though.

I don't think that's the reason. Dumoulin somehow seemed to be in the position of an underdog (whereas Thomas was on the dominating team that won most GTs anyway), and he also showed himself vulnerable a few times, in the end he was more "unfullfilled", whereas with Thomas it always felt more like he won at least everything that one could have expected, if he wasn't overachieving. I think those are more the important factors as to why they were perceived differently.
 
Yes.

People loved Dumoulin even though his transformation was the exact same and he also never attacked apart from one time on Oropa. I guess he wasn't British, though.
Dumoulin turned pro in 2012 when he was 21 and made the top-10 of Burgos. He had his breakthrough in the mountains when he was 5th in Suisse at age 23.

Thomas was 28 before he similarly was 5th in the 2015 Paris-Nice. Sure, he led the race the year before, but before any mountains.
 
If he had a different flag next to his name, and his name was Sanchez or Rossi, you'd be beside yourself with excitement.
Don't project. You can dig back through my post history to see what I thought of the likes of Isidro Nozal, Raúl Alarcón and Búfalo Gutiérrez. That's the kind of rider I think about when I think of a Spanish equivalent of Thomas.

I might plead somewhat guilty with regards Héctor Guerra, I guess.
¿What are you smoking? Kuss safe Roglic today. You are dogmatic
They did nothing with Kuss until they were in the small selection. Then when Jumbo had the advantage of numbers, he did nothing. Until Almeida attacked and then the responsibility for chasing fell on the isolated Thomas. And it was then that they put Kuss on the front, and he rode Thomas across to Almeida and dropped his own team leader.

After that, he did the right job, but before that, their usage of him was all over the place.
 
They did nothing with Kuss until they were in the small selection. Then when Jumbo had the advantage of numbers, he did nothing. Until Almeida attacked and then the responsibility for chasing fell on the isolated Thomas. And it was then that they put Kuss on the front, and he rode Thomas across to Almeida and dropped his own team leader.

After that, he did the right job, but before that, their usage of him was all over the place.
Lol, this is just so typical of you. There was nothing conspicuous about what Kuss did, and evidently, Roglic was not feeling that good, so Kuss had no business drilling as Roglic would benefit from a short break, yet here you are, slamming Kuss for no reason, inventing problems and arguments, grasping desperately for straws, when in fact all that Kuss did was limit the losses for Roglic and keeping him in the race.
 
Ah the old 'my doped guy has more natural talent than your doped guy, even though I don't know when either started doping' discussion typical of cycling forums whenever an Ineos guy looks decent.

Pastronef had a point.
This conversation can be had completely removed from the clinic.

Some people really like young, promising talents. Great champions who have shown their class on a bike from first pedal stroke. Independent of riding style, I think that's part of why many cheer for Remco.

The early career of Thomas was not exciting. Some are charmed by the old guy, just like with Horner, but it's not everyone's cup of tea.
 
Lol, this is just so typical of you. There was nothing conspicuous about what Kuss did, and evidently, Roglic was not feeling that good, so Kuss had no business drilling as Roglic would benefit from a short break, yet here you are, slamming Kuss for no reason, inventing problems and arguments, grasping desperately for straws, when in fact all that Kuss did was limit the losses for Roglic and keeping him in the race.

Exactly...

Kuss rode at a tempo that Roglic could do, while limiting losses to Almeida.

But Thomas, who was in between the Jumbo riders, probably sensed or felt that Roglic was on a bad day and attacked.

Jumbo were on the defense... why hadnt they been pacing at all? If Roglic was ok, Kuss would have taken over immediately after Vine was done and kept drilling it. Not let Almedia take a big turn and then Thomas. Almeida attacking and close down immediately. Roglic was on the limit of what he could do today. Last push in final km at least showed he was careful not going into red for too long.

To limit your losses to 25 seconds is a hit but probably could have been worse. Almeida and Thomas might regret not attacking earlier on this stage later, who knows at this moment.
 
They did nothing with Kuss until they were in the small selection. Then when Jumbo had the advantage of numbers, he did nothing. Until Almeida attacked and then the responsibility for chasing fell on the isolated Thomas. And it was then that they put Kuss on the front, and he rode Thomas across to Almeida and dropped his own team leader.

After that, he did the right job, but before that, their usage of him was all over the place.
They didn't have the advantage of numbers, because Kuss is irrelevant for GC. You wanted Kuss to attack for the stage? Leave Roglic exposed? You wanted Kuss to set the pace and drop his own leader with his rivals in his wheel? I have a hard time figuring out what you think should have transpired.
 

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