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Help: The "enemies" of Lance Armstrong?

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Jun 19, 2009
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Irish2009 said:
A person calling themselves "Vendetta78":rolleyes: comes on the forum & his first post is "Name Armstrongs Enemies":eek:..............ok!

You're Irish: get over the shock. One thing that struck me is Kristin Armstrong aka: Kristin his publicist and PR person may have some exposure herself as an accessory to fraud. Not criminal fraud but from anyone that has a civil cause of action that they want to bring against his estate for the time frame we're discussing. That could include many, many, people and organizations.
What does our legal staff say?
 
May 20, 2010
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Who cares what Landis says? He lost his credibility to come clean four years ago. People on this thread determined to take down Lance are just bitter. His story/success has sold bicycle racing to much of the U.S. public and advertisers.

Until he fails a drug test, it's just allegations. But the rhetoric is incredible considering the overwhelming indifference most people have towards doping in mainstream sports such as baseball, football, basketball, etc.

The Mitchell Report exposes more than 100 MLB players, including A-Rod, and nobody cares. A-Rod earns on one year what several Pro Tour teams spend collectively. Jason Giambi confessed to taking steroids and the Yankees still honored his $120 million contract!

But that's cool, the rest of you continue forward on your a mission of mutually assured destruction.
 
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Obviously Mr Armstrong's conscience is not going to be on the list.
 
Jun 19, 2009
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erkcyclisme said:
Who cares what Landis says? He lost his credibility to come clean four years ago. People on this thread determined to take down Lance are just bitter. His story/success has sold bicycle racing to much of the U.S. public and advertisers.

Until he fails a drug test, it's just allegations. But the rhetoric is incredible considering the overwhelming indifference most people have towards doping in mainstream sports such as baseball, football, basketball, etc.

The Mitchell Report exposes more than 100 MLB players, including A-Rod, and nobody cares. A-Rod earns on one year what several Pro Tour teams spend collectively. Jason Giambi confessed to taking steroids and the Yankees still honored his $120 million contract!

But that's cool, the rest of you continue forward on your a mission of mutually assured destruction.

You're assuming anyone here truly cares about the carnival that US Pro sports has become. Let's add World Cup Soccer, Pro Tennis,etc. I reserve my outrage for those sports to the toll it takes on developing youth players. If it takes losing sponsors and starting over with cycling that may be what it takes. You're assuming sponsors and federations aren't part of the problem, right?
 
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Thoughtforfood said:
Obviously Mr Armstrong's conscience is not going to be on the list.

Ah, but what about the Oedipus complex? I'd argue he's been attacked by that...

Danielle Overgaag
Sheryl Crow
Ashley Olsen (or was it the other one?)
Kate Hudson
Tory Burch
Whitney Casey
Kristin Richard (Armstrong)
Anna Hansen
 
Mar 14, 2010
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There is a saying that you are to keep your friends close and your enemies closer...if that is true...he knows his enemies and one just has to look at those who are closest...

If that fails.... I say the list would be me, you, him, her, us, them, we, those people over there, those folk, my peeps, and people like that... Running out of English expressions for people..
 
Mar 9, 2010
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Willy_Voet said:
What we really need is a list of muppets joining since Landis's email allegations...

help me sort out my ignore list...

kermit and fozzie bear are definitely on the list!

not sure if snuffleupagus is technically a muppet, but he may be sympathetic to the anti-armstrong cabal.

ms. piggie is definitely on the juice. she's almost as fat as graeme brown, ffs!
 
erkcyclisme said:
But that's cool, the rest of you continue forward on your a mission of mutually assured destruction.


Dear CyclingNews Forum,

I would be extremely grateful if someone could please point out to all of these Livestrong flunkies/Livestrong flunky/BPC the irony of them whinging about people "pursuing personal destruction".

Kind regards,

Roland.
 
May 23, 2010
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overwhelming indifference most people (in the US) have towards doping in mainstream sports such as baseball, football, basketball, etc.

Do you not see how this statement in fact incriminates Pharmstrong?

Furthermore, I'm assuming you mean mainstream in 'merica. There are around 200 other countries in the world who don't particularly care about those sports or consider them mainstream. Of course I'm assuming when you say 'football' you in fact mean NFL and not football.

If your country has a culture of doping and are for the most part indifferent towards it. Doesn't that suggest that your athletes are more prone to cheating? Thereby in a way confirming everyone's suspicions of Armstrong et al for all these years.
 
Mar 18, 2009
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UlleGigo said:
Do you not see how this statement in fact incriminates Pharmstrong?

Furthermore, I'm assuming you mean mainstream in 'merica. There are around 200 other countries in the world who don't particularly care about those sports or consider them mainstream. Of course I'm assuming when you say 'football' you in fact mean NFL and not football.

If your country has a culture of doping and are for the most part indifferent towards it. Doesn't that suggest that your athletes are more prone to cheating? Thereby in a way confirming everyone's suspicions of Armstrong et al for all these years.

Among the athletes linked to Fuentes in Operation Puerto were many Spanish Football players and Nadal. I don't remember there being any outrage--or real interest at all--in bringing them to justice. The culture of doping, and the general public indifference to it, is worldwide.
 
erkcyclisme said:
Who cares what Landis says? He lost his credibility to come clean four years ago. People on this thread determined to take down Lance are just bitter. His story/success has sold bicycle racing to much of the U.S. public and advertisers.

Until he fails a drug test, it's just allegations. But the rhetoric is incredible considering the overwhelming indifference most people have towards doping in mainstream sports such as baseball, football, basketball, etc.

The Mitchell Report exposes more than 100 MLB players, including A-Rod, and nobody cares. A-Rod earns on one year what several Pro Tour teams spend collectively. Jason Giambi confessed to taking steroids and the Yankees still honored his $120 million contract!

But that's cool, the rest of you continue forward on your a mission of mutually assured destruction.

wow............ 1 sane person on this entire board;)
 
Mar 18, 2009
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UlleGigo said:
Naturally you are perfectly qualified to gauge the entire planet's opinion on doping. :rolleyes:

As a man of the world and a rootless cosmopolite, I think I am.

What's more interesting to me, at least, is the way different sports view doping, in America at least. I think it's important to the average baseball fan that the players be clean--that there's genuine outrage about Clemons, Bonds, etc. This is probably because nostalgia is such an important aspect of the game--the traditions, the small town roots, Americana, etc. Meanwhile, it's just a given that American football players are jacked up on every conceivable drug, from steroids on, due to the ridiculous brutality of the sport. Nobody cares about what football players are on. If you talk to American sports fans (and yes, I'm speaking in huge generalities here, but I think it applies), you'll find a lot of inconsistencies-- the same guy will want his baseball players to be clean, and not care about at all about football players. Cycling is caught in between. Everyone's known that cyclists "ride on dynamite" (to use the famous quote) for decades. But within the past few years, it's suddenly changed and there's a huge amount of pressure from outside the sport to get rid of the drugs. It's a culture shift that a lot of riders and team management are having a hard time taking seriously, or are finally, perhaps maybe, taking seriously.

And that's my little sociology lecture for the day.
 
Jun 19, 2009
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Wallace said:
As a man of the world and a rootless cosmopolite, I think I am.

What's more interesting to me, at least, is the way different sports view doping, in America at least. I think it's important to the average baseball fan that the players be clean--that there's genuine outrage about Clemons, Bonds, etc. This is probably because nostalgia is such an important aspect of the game--the traditions, the small town roots, Americana, etc. Meanwhile, it's just a given that American football players are jacked up on every conceivable drug, from steroids on, due to the ridiculous brutality of the sport. Nobody cares about what football players are on. If you talk to American sports fans (and yes, I'm speaking in huge generalities here, but I think it applies), you'll find a lot of inconsistencies-- the same guy will want his baseball players to be clean, and not care about at all about football players. Cycling is caught in between. Everyone's known that cyclists "ride on dynamite" (to use the famous quote) for decades. But within the past few years, it's suddenly changed and there's a huge amount of pressure from outside the sport to get rid of the drugs. It's a culture shift that a lot of riders and team management are having a hard time taking seriously, or are finally, perhaps maybe, taking seriously.

And that's my little sociology lecture for the day.

To answer Susan, too-there is a world outside America but to respond to attitudes about American pro sports Wallace has come close to an accurate distillation. I expect that Americans and other Nationalities share the ambivalent approach to their particular sports fascinations. You can grumble all you want but go to a pub, share a few beers and watch a game, match with your buddies and check your interest level.
I can watch Usain Bolt sprint. I confess to mixed emotions having admitted that.
 
May 23, 2010
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I am an European living in the US so perhaps I can offer the following without being labeled as biased.

My experience is that Lance's friends in the US are most members of the general public, generally aware of his TdF accomlishments and charity work - and generally unaware of any of the detailed doping allegations. People dismiss them as sour grapes and coming from bitter competitors who could not beat Lance fair and square. Who could not like a man who's done so much good for cancer? "No one's perfect, but on balance Lance is a wonderful guy", these folks say.

The "enemies" list includes most people who follow the sport, participate in it themselves and are aware of the culture of corruption that doping will bring with it. But cycling is a relatively small sport in the US. Until now, it has taken a keen interest and lots of reading to form the opinion most of us share here on the clinic. The mainstream media in the US was mostly ignoring the doping allegations, in part due to the liability concerns for being sued by you-know-who. European media (esp. French and British) have been on his case in the past, but in the US he was still viewed as too much of a hero to be attacked without rock-solid evidence.

The Landis emails have changed the tone. The media coverage has been wide-spread and almost exclusively anti-Lance. The involvement of federal authorities will ensure this thing is not going away any time soon, and regardless of whether it leads to any indictments, almost certainly Lance's legacy even in the US is now toast - he joins Marion Jones, Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens as one of the tragically fallen US sports heros. It may also put a dark cloud over his cancer "charity" operations.