How do you like your coffee?

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How do you like your coffee?

  • Other

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    0
  • Poll closed .
hiero2 said:
Red: good attitude! Y'all are definitely more fun than the comic strips this morning. Instant, though, I'd rather find green tea. But, each to his own, I'll be looking to see that new bike when you get it!
Well... I kinda like green tea, so... :p
As for getting a racer; unfortunately becoming a millionaire seems a thing of the (distant) future.
Yesterday, when I went to buy a new helmet, I actually had to remind myself that I was not allowed to stay in the store and oggle over all the awesome bikes...
 
Mar 16, 2009
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Costa Rican Peaberry from Trader Joe's this morning. Just black for me at home.
Most mornings just Folger's. I've not found a mex. brand I care for. when I go to the states I pick up a variety of whole bean coffee's depending what's on sale:D
 
with ya

RedheadDane said:
I honestly only have one real demand regarding coffee:
It must be kaffeinated! Decaff is just... wrong!
i'm with you there..............what is the point of decaf?

or fancy coffee types...............it's instant for me

nescafe or more likely supermarket own brand ( aldi ) as i'm still too lazy

to work...................just pop the powder in big mug add water..instantly!

EDIT forgot to add........it must be black....milk is for babies

Mark L
 
Jan 15, 2011
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nice theme :D Espresso of course, sometimes ristretto - but too expansive for such a small amount of coffee:( But at home I usually have packaged coffee only poured with hot water.
 
wow!

ferryman said:
We've got a nice little Dolce Gusto with a good selection of different types on hand depending on how the mood (or hangover) finds us (me);)
wow! you're more sofistikated than you make out.................i thought

that far up north folk only drank irn bru , tennents 'n scotch

Mark L
 
That espresso lungo is very interesting. I'm going to see if my favorite place for espresso can do one.

Otherwise, espresso for me. And not just any espresso either. it's very hard to find good ones that put real money into getting a flavorful shot. At least in the U.S.

The french press is what I use at home. Not the same as espresso, but nice and strong.
 
gregod said:
I like my coffee like I like my women: strong, black and bitter:D

I voted "other" because my favorite kinds of coffee are Turkish and Balinese. But my morning cup is espresso made with a Bialetti.
Waitress to redneck customer : How would you like you coffee sir?

White redneck : As I like my women, hot and strong

Waitress : Black sir?

That's the way I heard it.
 
mewmewmew13 said:
:D
i once had two in a restaurant for lunch..i remember hallucinating on the way out.
Hmm, sounds like the one they served us in that rugs (not drugs) shop in Cairo. A unique experience. I probably would have tested positive coming out with the rug:D
 
un renversé s'il vous plait

If you are in Geneva and ask for a renversé*, instead of a café au lait you will get a lait au café, that is with more milk than coffee :roll eyes:

No, they will not spill it (renverser) for you on your lap.:D
 
JPM London said:
In France it's cafe creme most of the time, but comparing coffee between Italy and France is so not fair - what costs a single euro and tastes brilliantly in Italy is utterly ruined and utterly ruins you in France - cross the border and get a culture shock! Coffee in France is not about the drink but the atmosphere at the cafe...
I don't know about the comparison, but I agree that coffee in France is pretty poor far too often.

I blame it on price control : for several decades "Le p'ti noir" was one of the elements of the prices basket used to determine the cost of living in the country. So the government imposed a low price, like 0.5 franc per cup, which became more and more out of line with the price of a real coffee cup.

Consequently the expresso you got in cafés had less and less coffee and worse and worse quality.

When they did away with price control, cafés very often they only jacked the price, not the quality.

In Geneva you get a decent coffee but it comes at a price.
 
Jan 18, 2010
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Definitely espresso

I drink espresso made on my Rancilio Silvia.

I tend to follow my pre-morning ride espresso with a post ride americano.

This week I'm using The Sermon Espresso from Verve coffee roasters.
Next week it'll be Ozo coffee.
I find that the roaster is more important than how the coffee is brewed.

There's definitely good coffee to be found in the US, you just have to search for smaller local roasters and get fresh roasted coffee (within a week or two).
 
ebandit said:
wow! you're more sofistikated than you make out.................i thought

that far up north folk only drank irn bru , tennents 'n scotch

Mark L
Pardon my sophistication, I got it wrong, the Irn Bru is for the hangovers;) The coffee is the kicker:)
 
Benotti69 said:
Napoletano coffee.

John Turturo reckons the best coffee is to be had in Napoli.
That's what they say. Has to do with the water, Vesuvio etc. :)

Though the water's pretty good in Rome too. Caffè Sant Eustachio on Piazza Sant Eustachio is reckoned to make among the best coffee in town, though any torrefazione di caffè will grind excellent stuff.





 
DirtyWorks said:
That espresso lungo is very interesting. I'm going to see if my favorite place for espresso can do one.

Otherwise, espresso for me. And not just any espresso either. it's very hard to find good ones that put real money into getting a flavorful shot. At least in the U.S.

The french press is what I use at home. Not the same as espresso, but nice and strong.
Caffè lungo (because espresso is the process in making coffee and since for the Italians there can be no other way, they just say caffè, rather than caffè espresso to not be redundant) is simply one that is drawn out liquid wise, for those who prefer their caffè slightly less dense.

Personally I think it's a bit shocking. :D

Then, in Roma, there are those who prefer their caffè in a regular porcelain tazza, like in the photo above, and others who prefer theirs in a tazza di vetro (glass one) because it keeps the caffè hotter. ;)

But that's about it with the variations, unless we get into caffè corretto, which means caffè with a shot of liquoir in it good for the laborors at 7 AM.
 
DirtyWorks said:
That espresso lungo is very interesting. I'm going to see if my favorite place for espresso can do one.

Otherwise, espresso for me. And not just any espresso either. it's very hard to find good ones that put real money into getting a flavorful shot. At least in the U.S.

The french press is what I use at home. Not the same as espresso, but nice and strong.
Caffè lungo (becauseespresso is the process in making coffee and for the Italians there can be no other way, so they just say caffè) rather than caffè espresso to not be redundant) is simply one that is drawn out liquid wise, for those who prefer their caffè slightly less dense.

Personally I think it's a bit shocking. :D

Then, in Roma, there are those who prefer their caffè in a regular porcelain tazza, like in the photo above, and others who prefer theirs in a tazza di vetro (glass one) because it keeps the caffè hotter. ;)
 
Oct 20, 2012
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Freddo Capuccino. Sometimes sweet other not, depents on how long was the ride before the coffee brake .:)
 
Jan 15, 2011
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Hey guys, and whats your most favourite cafeteria chain, to me, it's Coffee Costa, I find their espresso very tasty - for here in Czechrepublic it's fairly hard to find a café making solid espresso, Costa remains secure option.
 
Jul 10, 2010
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biokemguy said:
. . .
I find that the roaster is more important than how the coffee is brewed.

There's definitely good coffee to be found in the US, you just have to search for smaller local roasters and get fresh roasted coffee (within a week or two).
You have revealed that you are a connoisseur and that you know of which you speak - but also that you are in a minority when in the US or Britain.

The age from the date of roasting is extremely important to the flavor, as is the roast of the beans.
 

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