Lloyd Mondory

Page 3 - Get up to date with the latest news, scores & standings from the Cycling News Community.
Zinoviev Letter said:
He's about to turn 33 and has won two stages of minor races since 2008. When he finishes a ban he'll be 35 or even 37 and will have an EPO positive on his record. He's not coming back as a pro rider. Who exactly is going to give him a shot as a DS over the dozens of retired riders looking for the same job who have some DS experience and no embarrassing positive?

What are these "careers in the sport" that low profile ex domestiques with doping bans can allegedly expect to be offered if they keep quiet?
http://crankpunk.com/2015/03/09/uci-employing-former-doper-man-behind-mtn-qhubeka-also-responsible-for-development-of-african-talent/ :D

Cyclists basically working in regional sports programs where public funds support it. Some go into the business-side of the bike industry.

The sane ones probably enjoy a ride after they are done at a real job.
 
Feb 26, 2015
8
0
0
Lloyd Mondory, yet another name for the Dopeology archives. One thing is for sure, he definitely won't be the last. Roll on the next positive. Maybe Danilo Di Luca was correct about the 90 % estimate. Another rider bites the dust. The question is "How can the big fish be caught" ?.
 
Zerlozion said:
Lloyd Mondory, yet another name for the Dopeology archives. One thing is for sure, he definitely won't be the last. Roll on the next positive. Maybe Danilo Di Luca was correct about the 90 % estimate. Another rider bites the dust. The question is "How can the big fish be caught" ?.
Grant WADA the authority to open cases. As the CIRC clearly states, the UCI was hiding positives and likely still is allegedly hiding positives.
 
The smug insistence on the whole "I thought the Frenchies were supposed to be clean?" thing in this time and age is pretty much as if, to this day, modern astronomists were all "I thought the Sun orbited the Earth? HA!". And yes I'm aware of what the CIRC report said about France, which was absurdly idiotic and outdated.
 
webvan said:
What "people" ?

Heard Lavenu on the radio, the man was in shock, no "storybook" stuff AFAICT. Since Mondori doesn't appear to have anything more to lose let's hope he comes "clean"...
I heard Lavenu as well, maybe the same interview. He was on the verge of crying, either he is genuinely distressed because he is actually trying to manage a clean team, or is an excellent actor (and incredible cycnic to boot).

OffTheBackAdam said:
I thought all the French were squeeky clean, cycling at two speeds & all.:rolleyes:
It should be obvious to all that Lloyd is a decidedly British name.
 
shalgo said:
In fairness though, Columbia's racing back then WAS disgusting. Can't fault Lloyd for that.
neineinei said:
He's got a god chance to be the first cyclist to get the 2015 CODE four-year ban.

He had a contract through 2016. The Steve Houanard explanation wount cut it it this time.
In the case of Houanard, I think the Houanard explanation is perfectly valid.
Jancouver said:
Only idiots do get ban for EPO these days (unless there is some new testing) therefore Mondory is a pure moron.
There is a new EPO test available - how much it's being used for cycling I do not know, but it is in use in XC skiing and biathlon. It's what led to the November and December positives of Aleksandr Loginov and Serguei Sednev, retesting old samples from athletes who were on the suspicious list when the new test became available.
frenchfry said:
It should be obvious to all that Lloyd is a decidedly British name.
Welsh, to be precise.
 
shalgo said:
That's the trick. I'm not reading someone "talking the anti-doping talk". What I read is an angry young man letting his frustration be heard.

Anger and frustration can lead to stupid decisions.

I'm not being a doping apologist here, but I can definitely see a starting point for a twisted pattern.

Back to AG2R... The list doesn't end with these 3 guys, I'm afraid. Christophe Moreau was once the leader of the team, I believe Paco Mancebo was busted while in the team too ?

Casino, the team AG2R was built on, wasn't a model of cleanliness, either...

I don't think there is a dope program within the team but it's clear that Lavenu fails to find a way to protect the team from those kind of initiatives, or worse, tends to provoke them and fails to question himself.
 
frenchfry said:
I heard Lavenu as well, maybe the same interview. He was on the verge of crying, either he is genuinely distressed because he is actually trying to manage a clean team, or is an excellent actor (and incredible cycnic to boot).



It should be obvious to all that Lloyd is a decidedly British name.
Good questions frenchfry. I think many posters on this forum REALLY underestimate the power of magical thinking. It's not just for kids! Some (not the majority, for sure) of these DSs (not riders) and owners really believed what they are saying! I know it seems crazy or incredibly na?ve when you look at the facts objectively, but in fact we all do it all the time, e.g.:
"Sure I can finish this report on time" (even though somewhere inside you know it requires 36 hrs of work in the next 24 hrs)
"I can catch that bus coming in 5 minutes" (even though you don't even have underpants on and its a 4 minute walk to the busstop). And so on . . .
 
If Lavenu was serious about anti doping he would have fired Betancur long ago.
Instead Lavenu knows all about whats going on (note: doesn't necessarily facilitates or push doping) and just hopes to hell some of his riders performs in top races.

Lavenu doesn't belong in a clean-ish sport (I'm not talking about cleans here).
 
Anyone want to try explaining why Mr. Mondory got a press release, instead of the new "update a document buried on our website" doping announcement method? Any ideas?

How long did the hidden form practice last, 3 months?
 
Jun 4, 2010
85
0
0
DirtyWorks said:
Anyone want to try explaining why Mr. Mondory got a press release, instead of the new "update a document buried on our website" doping announcement method? Any ideas?

How long did the hidden form practice last, 3 months?
low profile rider positive + circ report = easy opportunity for chest beating from UCI

... but really this is how it should be for all cases not just the "easy" ones.

...jeez - pro cycling makes you a cynical b*stard!
 
May 19, 2010
1,899
0
0
DirtyWorks said:
Anyone want to try explaining why Mr. Mondory got a press release, instead of the new "update a document buried on our website" doping announcement method? Any ideas?

How long did the hidden form practice last, 3 months?
Lately there have been statements about provisional suspensions for World Tour and (Pro) continental riders. (But no statements about Ulissis and Benedettis sanctions.)

There was a glitch in September, no statement for Maxim Iglinskiy, Ilya Davidenok or Matteo Rabottini. Maybe the clerk was on vacation?

The "no statement, only pdf update" system didn't last very long. They sent out a statement about JTL's sanction.

UCI statements for
Mauro Santambrogio
Valentin Iglinskiy
Victor Okishev
Artur Fedosseyev
 
May 19, 2010
1,899
0
0
Libertine Seguros said:
There is a new EPO test available - how much it's being used for cycling I do not know, but it is in use in XC skiing and biathlon. It's what led to the November and December positives of Aleksandr Loginov and Serguei Sednev, retesting old samples from athletes who were on the suspicious list when the new test became available.
The biathlon retest positives didn't seem to come from a new test, more that WADAs "The Technical Document on Harmonization of Analysis and Reporting of Recombinant Erythropoietins and Analogues by Electrophoretic Techniques" was revised last autumn.

The IBU president said that the lab had labeled five samples as "atypical findings" and those samples had been stored for retest.

The acceptance and identification criteria applicable to the Confirmation Procedures when using electrophoretic techniques are defined. Since now only one method (i.e. IEF or SDS-PAGE or SAR-PAGE, as applicable) is established for confirmation procedures of ESAs, the reference to the co-application of two different confirmation methods or to the reporting of the sample as an Atypical Finding (which was applicable when more than one method was applied and the method?s acceptance criteria were met for only one of them) has been removed.

https://wada-main-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/resources/files/WADA-TD2014EPO-Summary-Modifications-EN.PDF
It might just be a little easier to declare some samples positive for EPO after TD2014EPO came into effect 1 September 2014.

Apart from biathlon the only other sports listed with atypical findings for EPO in the 2013 WADA testing report, sports, are athletics (1 in marathon and 1 not specified) and road cycling (1), all in competition.

https://wada-main-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/resources/files/WADA-2013-Anti-Doping-Testing-Figures-SPORT-REPORT.pdf p. 14

According to the 2013 Lab report only the Paris (2) and Cologne (5) labs had atypical findings for EPO. The retested biathlon samples were almost certainly handled by the Cologne lab. (The IBU president wouldn't reveal the name of the lab...)

https://wada-main-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/resources/files/WADA-2013-Anti-Doping-Testing-Figures-LABORATORY-REPORT.pdf page 8
 
Yeah it's funny that the day after a report comes out saying that the biggest problem with the UCI has been shifting goalposts and a lack of standards applied equally, they decide to ignore their 'new' way of releasing information to opportunistically put out some info that they're 'tough on doping' and distract from the fallout. Although I guess it's one of the only times in which publicising a doping case has a positive result on the cost/benefit analysis, so it'd be hard to turn down. On the plus side, maybe catching this guy will be the tipping point to change the estimate to 19%-89% of the peloton doping.
 
skidmark said:
Yeah it's funny that the day after a report comes out saying that the biggest problem with the UCI has been shifting goalposts and a lack of standards applied equally, they decide to ignore their 'new' way of releasing information to opportunistically put out some info that they're 'tough on doping' and distract from the fallout. Although I guess it's one of the only times in which publicising a doping case has a positive result on the cost/benefit analysis, so it'd be hard to turn down. On the plus side, maybe catching this guy will be the tipping point to change the estimate to 19%-89% of the peloton doping.
Well, it is probably the last doper left and the UCI wanted to go out with a big sendoff.

Dave.
 
Sep 6, 2014
283
0
0
@NL_LeMondFans said:
That's the trick. I'm not reading someone "talking the anti-doping talk". What I read is an angry young man letting his frustration be heard.

Anger and frustration can lead to stupid decisions.
Anger and frustration also leads to the dark side young skywalker! :D
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY