Most memorable doped perfomances?

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burning said:
I might add a few more riders to this list. :p

Stapleton specials - Sinkewitz, Gerdemann, EBH (I know that Sky destroyed him), Greg Henderson, Goss, Cav, Velits, Rabon, Monfort, Ciolek. Nearly all of these guys lost a step or two after leaving Stapleton teams. Seriously, what was happening on those teams?
Gerald (Ciolek) was squeaky clean. Never had the focus though, always party with the wrong people (hear me Stauffi?).
 
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shalgo said:
Regarding Perdiguero, of whom GuyIncognito writes:

"Oh boy that Volta Catalunya he won. Bunch sprint? Win. TT? Win. Mountains? Win. Up to that week he'd been about the level Jesus Herrada is now, a good unspectacular rider."

That result was unbelievable, but there are two things that moderate it somewhat. First the competition there was weak: the two other riders on the final podium were Karpets and Laiseka. Second, his previous results were well above the level of a Jesus Herrada: wins at the Classica a los Puertos, GP Indurain, Vuelta a la Rioja, top ten in Milan-San Remo and the Giro di Lombardia. Earlier that spring, he had finished 2nd in the Setmana Catalana, 2 seconds behind Purito but ahead of Garzelli, Contador, Mayo, Basso, Leipheimer, etc, while finishing in the top 6 on every stage. The following season he was top ten in both Amstel and LBL.
Sorry, but a rider like Perdiguero had no business finishing on the podium of major short stage races. Apart from Rioja which was 3 categories below Setmana Catalana, I don't think he ever featured in the overall standing of a stage race before 2004.

Edit: ok, he finished 5th in Poland and 7th in Langkawi. Still, hardly amazing stage racing pedigree to suddenly win a HC race.
 
Plenty of options though, covering various types of terrains, cycling cultures and suspicion levels. That kind of one-two isn't that strange. After all, sure Chaves didn't lose much to the bunch on the climb, but he is already somebody we know is a world class climber. And Simon Yates didn't spring out of the group any more surprisingly than, say, Damiano Cunego on Aitana in 2009. It's not like either of them are unproven, maybe the others were just too tame for their own good waiting for future stages, à la 2012, or maybe they weren't and it was a ridiculous show of strength. Time will tell. Pozzovivo, López and maybe Pinot were perhaps less active than we might expect, but Bennett has mostly been a follower-type to date, Carapaz is unproven, Dumoulin is perhaps best suited to tempo, and Froome is clearly below his best, and they didn't exactly seem to be chasing Yates especially hard either even despite Froome only just about following (again, perhaps a harbinger of 2012 when Scarponi said they had seen Hesjedal suffering at the back a few times early in the race and didn't attack him as they assumed he'd fall away, and paid for it when he rode himself into form.

Aleksandr Vinokourov/Andrey Kashechkin, 2006


Leonardo Piepoli/Juan José Cobo, 2008


Leonardo Piepoli/Gilberto Simoni, 2007


Mirsamad Pourseyedi/Amir Kohladouz, 2013


Amaro Antunes/Raúl Alarcón, 2017


Serge Pauwels/Omar Fraile, 2017


Óscar Sevilla/Sergio Luís Henao, 2010


Ion Izagirre/Alejandro Valverde, 2014


Since Gewiss and Mapei managed to get three up there it was kind of special, makes it almost a shame LA-MSS couldn't drop Garzelli cos it meant Vicioso had to actually sprint there in Gijón. The other big shame is that CSF never did a similar 1-2 in 2008 (they did do a 1-2 in the Passo Fedaia stage, but Sella was floating far too easily for even his teammates to get close to him).
 
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Libertine Seguros said:
Since Gewiss and Mapei managed to get three up there it was kind of special
Mapei had the strongest rider in the race and he didn't even make that top 3!
Ballerini had a succession of punctures that dropped him minutes behind. Yet all by himself he was tearing into the gap that the front 3 had. Easily stronger than the 3 put together.

Lefevere panicked that his golden boy Museeuw might not win and told Ballerini to stop working. The excuse was that he was bringing the sprinter Zanini on his wheel. Ballerini countered that he could easily drop Zanini on the next cobbled section but of course Lefevere wouldn't allow him to even try. Museeuw must win, after all.

Lefevere insists Squinzi ordered it. Tafi and Bortolami are adamant that was not the case. Based on his past behaviour and statements, I'm inclined to believe literally everyone over Lefevere.

Also, you missed one of the many many Saunier 1-2s. Piepoli-Ricco on Tre Cime.
And we almost had another at the Basque Country with Cobo and Gil, until Gil crashed and hurt himself.
 
Feb 21, 2017
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Excellent history LS & GI! Re. the 1-2, really the only things I found suspect were Chaves' ability to hold off the entire peleton out front (having Haig up there probably helped a lot, granted), and then Yates' brutal jump around 1.5k to go. Both legit issues of possible concern though, I suppose.
 
Some more obscure ones as well (probably for the best not to remind people of these ones):

Juan Carlos Rojas / César Rojas, 2016


César Rojas / Juan Carlos Rojas, 2014


Juan Carlos Rojas / César Rojas, 2014


Amir Kohladouz / Ghader Mizbani, 2013


Mirsamad Pourseyedi / Ghader Mizbani, 2013


Amir Kohladouz / Ghader Mizbani, 2013
 
Since all performances are doped I might as well just go with the most memorable performances I've seen.

- Greg Lemond, 1989 Tour de France, stage 21 TT, Champs-Élysées. World record performance to win the Tour de France by 8 seconds!
- Floyd Landis, 2006 Tour de France, stage 17, Morzine. Best performance in the past 50 years!
- Alberto Contador, 2009 Tour de France, Stage 15, Verbier. The defining moment for the best GT rider of his generation.
- Mark Cavendish, 2009 Tour de France, Stage 21, Champs-Élysées. Given a tremendous launch from Mark Renshaw and takes off like a rocket. A bunch sprint turns into a solo breakaway as he wins by miles.
- Fabian Cancellara, 2010 Tour of Flanders. Infamous attack at Muur gains him an instant 30-second lead. Great encore a week later at Paris-Roubaix!
- Alberto Contador, 2012 Vuelta a Espana, Stage 17, Fuente De. Epic solo attack from 50km out! Valverde is able to close ground but Rodriguez cannot keep up and costs him the race.
- Chris Froome, 2013 Tour de France, Stage 15, Ventoux. A truly electric performance! Vicious 1000+ Watt acceleration leaves everyone behind. Great encore performance two years later, in 2015 Tour de France, Stage 10 (La Pierre Saint-Martin)
- Vincenzo Nibali, 2014 Tour de France, Stage 5, Arenberg Porte du Hainaut (the cobblestone stage). An epic team performance from Team Astana propels Nibali into the driver's seat. To be followed by an encore performance in Stage 18 (Hataucam).
- Vincenzo Nibalii, 2016 Giro, Stages 19-20. The comeback of comebacks! The best comeback in a Grand Tour in the last 30 years (since Floyd Landis' comeback was stricken from the record books).
 
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DanielSong39 said:
Since all performances are doped I might as well just go with the most memorable performances I've seen.

- Vincenzo Nibali, 2014 Tour de France, Stage 5, Arenberg Porte du Hainaut (the cobblestone stage). An epic team performance from Team Astana propels Nibali into the driver's seat. To be followed by an encore performance in Stage 18 (Hataucam).
One of my favorite performances ever. I wish that that Tour wasn't so stacked with MTFs and had all the big names in top form and finishing it, because it would have made this stage more memorable and influential. Astana was incredible here. How has Fuglsang not won Paris Roubaix, seeing how he performed that day?
 
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spiritualride said:
DanielSong39 said:
Since all performances are doped I might as well just go with the most memorable performances I've seen.

- Vincenzo Nibali, 2014 Tour de France, Stage 5, Arenberg Porte du Hainaut (the cobblestone stage). An epic team performance from Team Astana propels Nibali into the driver's seat. To be followed by an encore performance in Stage 18 (Hataucam).
One of my favorite performances ever. I wish that that Tour wasn't so stacked with MTFs and had all the big names in top form and finishing it, because it would have made this stage more memorable and influential. Astana was incredible here. How has Fuglsang not won Paris Roubaix, seeing how he performed that day?
Astana broke all the big names.
- Chris Froome had a dodgy wrist and couldn't keep up in stage 5, even before the crashes
- Contador took one risk too many and crashed in stage 10
- Porte and Valverde collapsed trying to keep up
- The rest raced tactically among themselves and tried to move up in the standings through attrition

Basically Astana took all the what-if's out of the equation that year and broke the top contenders both mentally and physically.
 
Re: Re:

spiritualride said:
DanielSong39 said:
Since all performances are doped I might as well just go with the most memorable performances I've seen.

- Vincenzo Nibali, 2014 Tour de France, Stage 5, Arenberg Porte du Hainaut (the cobblestone stage). An epic team performance from Team Astana propels Nibali into the driver's seat. To be followed by an encore performance in Stage 18 (Hataucam).
One of my favorite performances ever. I wish that that Tour wasn't so stacked with MTFs and had all the big names in top form and finishing it, because it would have made this stage more memorable and influential. Astana was incredible here. How has Fuglsang not won Paris Roubaix, seeing how he performed that day?
Well Fuglsang and Nibali still got dropped by Boom, who regularly tries to win Roubaix and hasn't even made the podium.
 
Re: Re:

DanielSong39 said:
- Chris Froome had a dodgy wrist and couldn't keep up in stage 5, even before the crashes
- Contador took one risk too many and crashed in stage 10
Froome crashed out before the cobbles, Contador crashed on a straight road while taking no risks whatsoever.
 
Contador crashed on the Petit Ballon descent. Which is actually quite narrow and tricky with rough road surface as I've seen in multiple Vosges pictures and videos. He must have been a bit behind at that moment as well. Because in the coverage you see the peleton led by Astana turn left from the Petit Ballon descent into the street that ascends the Col du Platzerwasel. Shortly after you see supossed live pictures from a crashed Contador further up the road.
 
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staubsauger said:
Contador crashed on the Petit Ballon descent. Which is actually quite narrow and tricky with rough road surface as I've seen in multiple Vosges pictures and videos. He must have been a bit behind at that moment as well. Because in the coverage you see the peleton led by Astana turn left from the Petit Ballon descent into the street that ascends the Col du Platzerwasel. Shortly after you see supossed live pictures from a crashed Contador further up the road.
If i recall correctly, he was reaching for something in his pocket as he hit a pot hole and thus crashed
 
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infeXio said:
staubsauger said:
Contador crashed on the Petit Ballon descent. Which is actually quite narrow and tricky with rough road surface as I've seen in multiple Vosges pictures and videos. He must have been a bit behind at that moment as well. Because in the coverage you see the peleton led by Astana turn left from the Petit Ballon descent into the street that ascends the Col du Platzerwasel. Shortly after you see supossed live pictures from a crashed Contador further up the road.
If i recall correctly, he was reaching for something in his pocket as he hit a pot hole and thus crashed
Yes, Contador hit a pothole while putting food from his musette into his pockets.
 
For me, it is Froome on Mt. Ventoux 2013 -- not for its greatness, but for its ridiculousness. I realize this thread might be intended to be restricted to performances in which doping was confirmed through a positive test or later admission by a rider -- which would technically exclude Froome's performance that day -- but come on. :)
 
JosephK said:
For me, it is Froome on Mt. Ventoux 2013 -- not for its greatness, but for its ridiculousness. I realize this thread might be intended to be restricted to performances in which doping was confirmed through a positive test or later admission by a rider -- which would technically exclude Froome's performance that day -- but come on. :)
Any ridiculous performance is welcome in this thread regardless of proof. We consider the performance itself the proof! :D
 
Re: Re:

GuyIncognito said:
GuyIncognito said:
Oh boy, I can think of quite a few blatant ones
Maybe if I can be bothered I'll type them out tomorrow
Every single case on this list caused disbelief. Every one staggered me. Every performance here made me audibly ask "WTF?" Be warned, all this is from memory so many of the dates/etc are likely to be wrong
Deep breath

Basso - From top 10 GC contender at Fassa to Armstrong's main contender at CSC, to that ridiculous thing at the 2006 Giro. Even Simoni felt compelled to call him an "alien". When else have you seen such a thing? 2000 VAM at Monte Bondone? Nearly tying Ullrich in a 50km flat windy TT? Beating Zabriskie? Come on now...

Jose Enrique Gutierrez - 1,88m 78kg and from one day to the next suddenly climbing with Simoni.

Riis - From bland basic domestique for the flat stages at 28 to Tour winner at 32 with the highest w/kg ever recoded on a mountain finish

Pecharroman - Anonymous for years until suddenly he's toying with a talented field at the Euskal, then dropping even Heras at Catalunya (boredly commenting that he expected an even bigger gap!) and then disappears forever.

Kashechkin - Vinokourov's pet project to create a clone of himself

Rumsas - He would've beaten Armstrong in that Tour TT if his bike hadn't broken. Hell, he won a monument.

Perdiguero - Oh boy that Volta Catalunya he won. Bunch sprint? Win. TT? Win. Mountains? Win. Up to that week he'd been about the level Jesus Herrada is now, a good unspectacular rider.

Mayo - That April 2003 to June 2004 period was hilarious to watch. Then Armstrong called the UCI to rein it in and never again...

Aitor Gonzalez - Yet another sudden transformation

Colom - Suddenly discovered new powers in his 30s, beating Contador on the climbs. If he hadn't tested positive he'd have probably contended for GTs

Wiggins - At 29 he goes from a nobody who couldn't climb a speedbump and celebrated finishing only a few minutes behind in TTs, to outclimbing the best and winning TTs by minutes. Pull the other one.

Leipheimer - Another one who suddenly realized he had talent at nearly 30

Hincapie - From sprinter to classics rider to climber? What? Kelly and Jalabert did it before, but they actually had quite some climbing talent as youngsters. Hincapie was a pure sprinter, whole different kettle of fish.

Horner - Not good enough to hold a pro contract in europe at 28, wins the Vuelta at 42? Doing the same time up Angliru in the wet that peak Contador did in the dry?

Kim Andersen - The record holder for positive tests. In a time when almost nobody tested positive and nobody cared and the suspension was usually "you're relegated to the back of the bunch on that stage, try not to dope for the next stage". Not even booted from the race, much less suspended. In those days this guy tested positive so many times that eventually he was given a long term suspension. In the eighties!

The entire 2008 CSF Navigare squad - Sella climbing like Pantani to come back from 24 minutes down on GC to 2 before the TT. Priamo winning a stage. Baliani in every break

Chioccioli - Career bottom of top 10 climber is suddenly Charly Gaul, winning queen stages solo from 50km out, winning 60km flat TTs

Furlan - That 3 year stretch there was something else. Then he fell off a cliff

Gabriele Colombo - Still the fastest ascent of the Poggio ever. Even with a tailwind modern riders can't come close. Also promptly fell off a cliff like most on this list

Frattini - Went on a tear for a brief time, then faded to obscurity

Ugrumov - Another career bottom of the top 10 climber, 8th in the Giro here, 9th in the Vuelta there. Then in his 30s he's suddenly putting Indurain against the ropes. Not just the 93 Giro, but especially the 94 Tour's Alps where he does exactly what Sella would do 15 years later. He put over 3 minutes into Indurain in the Morzine time trial after days of being in breaks, what on earth?

Pascal Herve - That day on the Izoard would've been funny if it wasn't so shocking. He wasn't a bad climber, but was more of a punchy guy for short climbs. We're all riveted watching Pantani vs Armstrong when 36 year old Pascal catches them, goes "oh hi there" and drops them.....drops....Pantani and Armstrong....in the mountains

Dufaux @ Romandie 98 - Braking for corners going up a mountain isn't even remotely normal

Since we're discussing Festina. I know they're an easy target, but I remember a mountain stage in 97 when the group was down to 15 riders or so and every Festina was still there except for the one who was sick, Laukka, who until then had been climbing with the top 5 (another one hit wonder who later didn't do anything elsewhere)

The Saunier squad over a few years (Cobo, de la Fuente, Zaballa, Piepoli, Riccò, Perdiguero, Gil, Marchante) - Where do I even begin?

Froome - Just edges out Pecharroman and Armstrong for the most ridiculous transformation the sport has ever seen. This out of contract guy who Sky are letting go because he is simply terrible at everything, suddenly becomes the best rider on the planet. Just overnight. From getting dropped by the sprinters at the Tour of Poland to thrashing everyone at the Vuelta. A modern miracle, no doubt.

Marcelino García - 1998 early season. Never to be repeated.

Sergey Kolesnikov - Those 2006 results, eh? For 6 months as a 19/20 year old, wins basically every race, then does nothing for the rest of his career.

Mikhail Ignatiev - Like Kolesnikov and to a lesser extent Moreno Moser, Ignatiev started his pro career like a bat out of hell. Was rumoured to be called to attention over his blood values. Fell off a proverbial cliff.

Francesco Ginanni - See Ignatiev. This one took arguably even further.

W52 these last few years (Veloso, Alarcon) - Put them in the World Tour, they'd win the whole thing

Nozal - If in 2008 he was caught on EPO and wasn't riding for toffee, what on earth was he on in 2003??? He won the TT by 1m20s on some of the world's best who were loaded with EPO.

Fran Perez - That 2003 early season was funny as hell. Went down the wrong road and lost the win? No problem, just drop everyone again the next day

De Bonis - All day in the break. Gets caught. Drops them again to win. Truly Gerolsteiner's test mule for the 2008 Tour

Santi Perez - From mediocre climber to best climber in the race to winning a fast flat TT. Screw drugs, how is it even physically possible?

LA MSS circa 2003 and again in 2008 - Shades of Gewiss 94. The way they toyed with the field in Asturias

Europcar 2011 (Kern, Voeckler) - Kern did nothing before or since in his career, but that Dauphiné he won in the mountains and finished 6th. Also won the french TT championships by 2 minutes on Péraud, Coppel, etc. Then Voeckler would've won the Tour if not for a tactical blunder on Alpe d'Huez.

Gerolsteiner - Schumacher and Kohl may have been obvious, but Fothen was the prototypical fast donkey and let's not ignore Lang

Gonchar 2006 Tour - As ridiculous as Landis was, he couldn't come within a minute of Gonchar in either TT

Wesemann Amstel 2006 and Cancellara Worlds 2009 - Two guys unsuited to such hilly courses who both were hilariously strong those days and both threw away easy wins by being tactically stupid. Those two performances were so far beyond believable I can only laugh

Cancellara July 2008 - "Oh look, I can suddenly climb mountains for the first and only time never to be repeated". Dropping climbers on the Croix-de-fer...

Jaskula - 3rd place in a stacked Tour de France field. Unrepeated again.

Halupczok - Barely any results in the amateur ranks until the time the first guys get on EPO. Suddenly he's the best amateur in the world and world champion. Turns pro. Immediately up there fighting for the Giro win as a neo-pro when he suddenly and mysteriously quits the race. Returns to anonymity. By the end of the season he's retired at age 22. Shortly after that he's dead of a heart attack

The entire Cofidis team at the 98 Tour - If Casagrande hadn't crashed out he'd have won that Tour. Bet on it. He was flying. Rinero and Julich weren't nearly on the same level and finished 5th and 3rd. Bobby freaking Julich finished 3rd. Hell, a nothing rider like Rinero still has the record for the fastest climb of the Tourmalet.

Luttenberger - Another shooting star. Wins the Tour de Suisse, 5th at the Tour de France, then....nothing. Just another one in the line of Carrera's Pantani clones like Zaina or Poulnikov

Garcia Quesada - Prototypical Fuentes special

Mercatone Uno - Especially at the 98 Giro final TT. Sprinters and climbers beating the specialists in a TT. That day Pantani really went all out on the EPO and screw the consequences. Then came the blood sample switching story

Murilo Fischer - Look at his 2005. Just look at it.

Jonathan Tiernan-Locke - The question "Where did Pecharroman go?" was finally answered. He was reborn as an englishman with an unpleasant personality

Lotto 2011 - Vdb takes the only win of his career, Vanendert not only learns to climb but wins a major Tdf mountain stage, Gilbert has the most ridiculous season anyone's likely to see anytime soon which he of course won't ever come close to repeating

Clement L'Hottelerie - That one early season madness. Then nothing. Then positive.

Johnny Hoogerland - He was all over every kind of race. Then was tested 3 times in a week, realized they were on to him, and never performed again. As the team doctor later said, he was pumped to the gills on doses obscenely large even for that team.

Andrey Zintchenko - Mediocre roleur, then wins 3 stages in one Vuelta, mountains included.

Melchor Mauri - After several grand tours with a best finish of 71st he won the Vuelta by gaining minutes on Indurain during TTs and defending in the mountains. Then the rest of the world caught up and he never threatened a GT podium again. Let that sink in, gaining minutes in Indurain in TTs. Indurain won the Tour de France that year.

Mauro Gianetti - At age 30 his palmares is nothing. Then EPO comes along and along with several other good results he ends his career with an Amstel win and a Liége win plus a Worlds silver. His career and life almost ended by doping with too much PFC and being rushed to the hospital with a flatlining heartbeat

Andrea Ferrigato - From mediocre he suddenly moves up about 5 levels in performance to win classics for half a season and almost win the World Cup based on that one season alone. Then at the end of the season the UCI institutes the 50% red blood cell limit and he goes back to being anonymous

Frank Vandenbroucke - In one season he won Het Volk, would've won Paris-Nice if not for of a wind split, 2nd in Flanders again only due to bad luck with a crash, won LBL, 7th in Roubaix (a guy who weighed only 65kg!!!) and was the strongest rider in the Vuelta, leading to among other things the infamous day on Navalmoral. Then he finished with the elite front group in a hilly world championships riding with two broken wrists. All this while missing a chunk of the season to a doping investigation.

It was pants on head *** how strong he was. Years later his Cofidis teammates explain why: He and his friend Phillippe Gaumont went much further than anyone else dared with drug use. They reaped a huge performance advantage from it but their bodies couldn't take it. A year later they couldn't perform anymore and now they're both dead of heart attacks at young ages.
After reading this post, I looked at wiki for more info about Halupczok but it says 'The autopsy has shown that he has not died of a heart attack.' and
'Professor Romuald Lewicki from Zakład Medycyny Sportowej WAM in Lodz (Institute of Sports Medicine) claims that Halupczok's cardiac arrhythmia was genetic because his father and son suffer from the same condition.'
I am curious about it so just asking, is the heart attack thing your assumption or was it on the news?
Then again there aren't any references to these sentences there.

Excellent list btw.
 
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GuyIncognito said:
It's been years so I can't recall any sources, but it was reported as a heart attack back then.
Looking at the wikipedia edit history, that's been changed recently. It used to say

https://ipfs.io/ipfs/QmXoypizjW3WknFiJnKLwHCnL72vedxjQkDDP1mXWo6uco/wiki/Joachim_Halupczok.html

In fact, just google "Joachim Halupczok death" and google replies with "heart attack"

This may be due to some confusion between the terms "heart failure" and "heart attack"
Ah, thanks. Probably one of the first users of EPO and his death is looking like because of EPO.
Dying at 26 is way too young. :(
 

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