Music! What are you listening to now?

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escheator said:
Can't go wrong with Clapton. Anyone heard his new "Clapton & Friends" release? Could be very good.....

We turned on the German public Culture channel the other night at random and stumbled on a Hugh Laurie New Orleans Jazz concert. We now have 2 of his CDs...... love it!
 
Jun 18, 2012
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Libertine Seguros said:
So very true, mind you I think they really went downhill when Steve Hackett left, the first two after PG's departure weren't too bad, but that was indeed the start of the descent into cr4pness.

You may not be able to access it, but there was a fine documentary on the BBC last week, Genesis, together and apart, which featured them talking. Very apparent that despite his undoubted talent and the fact that Genesis wouldn't have been Genesis without him, Tony Banks is a right bell-end.

I'm going to see PG in December on Back to Front.
 
On Every Street made me love Dire Straits. Gradual tempo increase like in Stairway to Heaven.


I bought an LP of A Trick of the Tail by Genesis, first with Phil Collins and I found it very good, even better than the Gabriel era.

The reason why they became so terrible is that prog rock was no longer fashionable and they had to adapt to new genres, in the late 70's/80's: disco, punk, etc. All that crap. So did Yes and to lesser extent, Pink-Floyd.

Maaaaaaaarten said:
Maurice Ravel - Tocatta from le Tombeau de Couperin
hmm haven't heard it but usually as much as I love the impressionists in paintings, I don't really like them in music. Ravel's Bolero I find the themes lovely but the piece is too repetitive for me. ;)
 
Oct 23, 2011
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Echoes said:
hmm haven't heard it but usually as much as I love the impressionists in paintings, I don't really like them in music. Ravel's Bolero I find the themes lovely but the piece is too repetitive for me. ;)
I agree about the Bolero, but a lot of the impressionist music is very different. The famous pieces from Debussy and Ravel, like the Bolero, or Clair de Lune or Rêverie are a bit more accessible for a larger audience, than most of their music and therefore they have become more famous. They use more conventional melodies and chords and a lot of the more unconventional harmonies and melodies still sound quite peaceful, dreamy and relaxed. However, Debussy and Ravel also have much more modern pieces that were very much avant garde for their day, moving towards atonality, not shunning dissonance and using very unconventional and sometimes very harsh harmonies, melodies and rhythm's.

Some examples of impressionist music that is a bit more avant-garde for their day:

Claude Debussy - Ce qu'a vu le vent d'ouest
Claude Debussy - Feux d'Artifice
Ravel - Scarbo (from Gaspard de la Nuit) (this is considered one of the most difficult, most technically demanding pieces to play on the piano btw)
Ravel - Valses Nobles et Sentimentales

So concluding, though the more experimental pieces probably won't receive attention from a large audience, there is certainly more to impressionist music than the Bolero or Clair de Lune. :)
 

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