National Football League

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Jul 14, 2009
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I am predicting that San Diego goes undefeated, wins the super bowl and Joey Bosa is the MVP and gets honored as the best player in the NFL. Also I predict that the macerena will make a world wide comeback as the most popular song and dance. Also people will start using fax machines like crazy. Invest in fax machines!!!!!
 
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fatandfast said:
I am predicting that San Diego goes undefeated, wins the super bowl and Joey Bosa is the MVP and gets honored as the best player in the NFL. Also I predict that the macerena will make a world wide comeback as the most popular song and dance. Also people will start using fax machines like crazy. Invest in fax machines!!!!!
Actually I thought that was all pretty obvious ! You forgot to say that Richie Porte will win the Tour.
 
Sad and glad news all wrapped into one: ex-Lions and Bears QB from the early 90's Erik Kramer, who had a good 10-year NFL career, survived a suicide attempt 9 months ago. I do not recall hearing about this, but over the past 9 months Erik has been in and out of several hospitals where he had surgeries to repair the damage. The sad part is obvious, but the good news is he has not lost any of his short-term memory, cognitive brain functions, body functions, AND has not suffered any of the depression he was feeling that led him to his suicide attempt. Adding to that, players and friends have reached out to him and he is presently rebuilding his relationships.

His ex-wife claims he became a different man than the one she married because of all the concussions he had as a player, but Erik does not recall having any concussion symptoms worth reporting. But he was no stranger to depressing events. Besides his divorce, he tragically lost his 18-year old son Griffin, who at the time was a HS QB, to a drug overdose in 2011.

Through the experience, Erik says what he has learned from this is that "I should be alive". That is a good lesson for anyone suffering from depression as he did.

READ the full article of his story by Dave Birkett in the Detroit Free Press here:
http://www.freep.com/story/sports/nfl/lions/2016/05/21/erik-kramer-detroit-lions/84657892/
Good article. So, here is to pulling for Erik Kramer. Never give up.
 
on3m@n@rmy said:
Sad and glad news all wrapped into one: ex-Lions and Bears QB from the early 90's Erik Kramer, who had a good 10-year NFL career, survived a suicide attempt 9 months ago. I do not recall hearing about this, but over the past 9 months Erik has been in and out of several hospitals where he had surgeries to repair the damage. The sad part is obvious, but the good news is he has not lost any of his short-term memory, cognitive brain functions, body functions, AND has not suffered any of the depression he was feeling that led him to his suicide attempt. Adding to that, players and friends have reached out to him and he is presently rebuilding his relationships.

His ex-wife claims he became a different man than the one she married because of all the concussions he had as a player, but Erik does not recall having any concussion symptoms worth reporting. But he was no stranger to depressing events. Besides his divorce, he tragically lost his 18-year old son Griffin, who at the time was a HS QB, to a drug overdose in 2011.

Through the experience, Erik says what he has learned from this is that "I should be alive". That is a good lesson for anyone suffering from depression as he did.

READ the full article of his story by Dave Birkett in the Detroit Free Press here:
http://www.freep.com/story/sports/nfl/lions/2016/05/21/erik-kramer-detroit-lions/84657892/
Good article. So, here is to pulling for Erik Kramer. Never give up.
That's enough suffering for one person. More than enough.
 
Dec 7, 2010
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fatandfast said:
I am predicting that San Diego goes undefeated, wins the super bowl and Joey Bosa is the MVP and gets honored as the best player in the NFL. Also I predict that the macerena will make a world wide comeback as the most popular song and dance. Also people will start using fax machines like crazy. Invest in fax machines!!!!!
Don't just pick the obvious - go out on a limb next time. :D
 
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Alpe d'Huez said:
I honestly don't see how the Chargers are going to get past RGIII and the Browns in the NFC Championship, let alone the Kelly-Kaepernick led 49ers in the Super Bowl.

That story about Kramer was a little too hard to read.
Yes if San Diego don't do what everyone expects them to do it has to be the Browns and 49ers for the Superbowl ! You know the NFL fans demand it and need it !
 
Thanks for that link, I can't say I'm surprised. Maybe the only surprise is that Congress made a note of it, and that it leaked. Big props again to the Fainarus for digging this up. Along with Lance Williams (Game of Shadows with Mark) these are some of the few sports investigative journalists left on the planet. And props to ESPN for employing them for this. While the brothers have freelanced and worked for the SF Chronicle, this gives ESPN some needed cred in an industry where they are called the four-letter network by their peers, often for broadcasting garbage, and hiring loud mouthed idiots while being enamored with what Howard Cosell called jockocracy.
Steve Fainaru and Mark Fainaru-Wada of ESPN's Outside the Lines obtained the 91-page congressional report, which details the NFL's improper strong-arming efforts. According to the report, the NFL was displeased with the choice of Boston University's Dr. Robert Stern and pulled its $16 million contribution when the NIH refused to change its selection.

"It's one of the most troubling and disturbing reports I've seen," NFLPA Executive Director DeMaurice Smith said Monday on SportsCenter, via the report. "It reaffirms the fact that the league has its own view about how they care about players in the NFL."
The league of course denied it in a statement, but the wording was vague and talked about their efforts and money put into it. But the article goes on to say that it's really tax payer money that is paying for everything so far.
"They wanted to look like the good guy, like they were giving money for this research," U.S. Rep. Frank Pallone Jr. told OTL. "But as soon as they found out that it might be somebody who they don't like who's doing the research, they were reneging on their commitment, essentially."
This is ugly all on it's own, even if only partly true, but I'm reminded of two things. One was when Mark Cuban said the NFL was getting too big for it's britches, and "pigs get fat, but hogs get slaughtered". I don't think I'd want to spend more than 5 minutes talking to Cuban if I met him, but he's a very sharp guy, knows his business, and he's starting to look more right by the day.

Next, this once again backs up what I said about Roger Goddell. The next CBA negotiation will get nowhere if his powers aren't curbed. The NFLPA will fight that to the bitter end. And they're going to get wide support from the fans. Anyone who saw the last two drafts noticed that every time Goodell came on stage he was booed. Every single time. Nearly all the players hate him, he's been very uneven in his autocratic punishment, he's at the top of the heap denying brain trauma from his sport, and now for fighting research, and the fans are waking up to this and dislike him as well for his abuse of power. How long will the owners put up with this? And keep in mind, I was one of the people praising Goodell at the last CBA for pulling things through and protecting the shield. That was a very tough situation, he kept his cool and worked the phones and rooms along with key owners and NFLPA and their lawyers and the league didn't miss a game. The money from those decisions has been big, but boy what a nasty five years it's been.
 
Yes, thanks for that link. I actually saw ESPN's Fainaru/Wada report via May 23 Tweet from SEA WR Doug Baldwin, who in light of the report was critical of the league (Rog). The ESPN link which includes a pretty good video explaining the problem is: http://espn.go.com/espn/otl/story/_/id/15667689/congressional-report-finds-nfl-improperly-intervened-brain-research-cost-taxpayers-16-million. One in my immediate family works in CA in concussion protocols at the collegiate level, and knows of the NFL's committee members for head/neck/spine injuries, and says Ellenbogen (mentioned in ESPN report) is a UW grad and the committee members are researchers, volunteers for the NFL committee (paid tho?), and "independent" and wired to be true to science/health/safety for the most part.

But the NFL wanting to award the concussion study contract to their internal committee members would be like if I were a contract specialist for the federal government who awarded a contract to one of my family members. If the Feds discovered I had done that I'd lose my job and be facing jail time. The current NFL position is too much of a conflict of interest, and hurts the cred of the NFL towards player health and safety. If the NFL wants to improve cred in that area they'd best go along with the NIH awarding the contract to the Boston U researchers.

OFC, the NFL retort about conflicts is they aim that gun at the NIH & BU researchers saying the selection of the BU researchers to conduct the study is a conflict of interest there because those researchers are actually concerned about player safety "and might do anything to sway the results towards the interest of the players" (in quotes is only my translation). Okay, so let's assume there is some conflict of interest with the selection of the BU researchers, and then compare that against the obvious conflict of interest the NFL has wanting its own committee members to do the study. The NFL conflict of interest is far, far worse than the hypothetical NIH's conflict of interest (b/c NFL's is based on affiliates who have direct connection to the NFL, whereas BU fellas are simply concerned about health and safety and by definition should not even be considered a conflict of interest). Personally, I do not believe conflict of interest is involved in the NIH's selection of the BU researchers to do the study.

Stepping back a bit, I have felt the NFL league officials (Roger & Co.) were previously untouchable. It is clear that Boston U and their researchers are not afraid of the NFL. I think that scares the league's top dogs knowing they will not be able to control or corral BU's researchers like they would their own internal "independent" committee members. Especially knowing the NIH process requires more peer review, something that would probably cause fear for Roger. But the idea of NFL being untouchable or not is going to be interesting to watch. It might come down to that football players, owners, and the game itself survives, but under a restructured league where one person like Roger does not have complete control. Maybe the NFLPA forms a new league with current teams and owners and just says goodbye to Roger, or just fire Roger.

Finally, I just have to say this for the players, but don't have all the facts on player contracts. Do player contracts include a statement about knowingly playing a game that has high risk of injury and players have no legal recourse against the league if permanently injured? If the answer to that is Yes, then the NFL trying to redirect performance of the study to their internal doctors (with high chance for bias) is almost like trying to withhold from the players what all of the risks really are that they would be agreeing to waive by signing their player contracts. To me, NFL doing that would be the lowest form of low by treating players like a piece of meat and blatant unconcern for player safety.
 
Thanks for the insights from the two of you. One thing I have noticed is that the mainstream media is starting to report more on the dangers of the NFL, and what is happening in high schools and colleges. But it's good to know that there are some quality investigative journalists doing good work also. This line of work has taken a hit in recent years on major newspapers because of the disappearing revenues. Investigations cost money and TV and print don't want to fork out for it anymore and conventional journalism is a dying industry. They would rather get the syndicated version cheap or the Wikipedia version. Goodell comes across like a tobacco company executive. Surely some mud has to stick to him.
 
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movingtarget said:
Thanks for the insights from the two of you. One thing I have noticed is that the mainstream media is starting to report more on the dangers of the NFL, and what is happening in high schools and colleges. But it's good to know that there are some quality investigative journalists doing good work also. This line of work has taken a hit in recent years on major newspapers because of the disappearing revenues. Investigations cost money and TV and print don't want to fork out for it anymore and conventional journalism is a dying industry. They would rather get the syndicated version cheap or the Wikipedia version. Goodell comes across like a tobacco company executive. Surely some mud has to stick to him.
I like that comparison to the tobacco exec. But not sure if anything will stick to him now because, under pressure from the congressional report that revealed the NFL tried to strong-arm the NIH, Goodell has apparently tucked his tail between his legs and run, saying he supports "continued and robust support of independent medical research" and that he never considered not honoring a $30 million commitment to the NIH. Riiiight. He's like a little kid who pushes the limits to see how far he can get before the hammer drops.
http://espn.go.com/nfl/story/_/id/15752174/goodell-reaffirms-nfl-concussion-research-role
 
Would Vegas even have a large enough NFL market to support a team? I dunno.

Run Pass Option (RPO) is an interesting trend in football programs at all levels (HS, NCAA, & pro). But first I wondered how football got to this point, even knowing offensive coaches are always trying to get an edge on defenses.

Several weeks ago I posted how one local HS coach, who has a son in the NFL (even if just barely) and who gets his way around to visiting college programs due to lots of spare time being a retired teacher, says that college football programs are “starving” for QBs. A few days later NFL radio aired a segment about the huge talent gap that exists between college QBs and NFL QBs. I chalked that up as interesting. On the heels of that, Bleacher Report posted this article on “Are RPO’s the next big thing to hit NFL offenses?” That got my attention.
http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2642541-are-rpos-the-next-big-thing-to-hit-nfl-offenses

This first question that came to mind was whether or not QB talent level is helping drive the change in HS and college teams to running RPO. There are a lot of interesting facets to RPO offenses. But here are a few facts when it comes to RPO:
- RPO is simpler for offensive line blocking. That is because the OL is ALWAYS run blocking, even when it is a pass. This puts second tier defenders (LBs, CBs, and safeties who occupy pass lanes) at conflict. No longer can these defenders immediate read pass because the O-Linemen heads are not popping up as in traditional drop back pass blocking. The defenders must use other reads, and the undisciplined defender will bite and fill a run gap.
- Because of that, the QB, instead of using full-field reads of the defense, just reads the defender at conflict for the given play. So, many times the play is simpler for the QB to execute to get the ball in the right hands. And often the pass is not long downfield.

And then if the play is easier for the QB to execute, then it is also easier to teach, which is particularly important at the HS and college level where teams only have players a few years. Helping fuel this trend to RPO offenses at the HS and NCAA level is the fact that many defenders are not well disciplined when it comes to executing their defensive role. Many defenders just want to get to the ball instead of performing their role, and find it difficult to learn to trust their teammates. That is part of why RPO in HS and NCAA is successful. That and the fact defensive coaches have to figure out how to stop RPO’s, which is a huge topic itself.

So, will RPO make more headway into the NFL? RPO is not the same as the NFL’s Read-Option that teams like SEA, CAR, and SF have run. RPO is full-scale commitment to a read option on EVERY play. That means there is a pass element to every run play, and a run element to every pass play. And to put defenders into conflict (e.g. do they play pass or read run and fill gaps), the OL tactics are to always run block. The twist to this style of blocking is OL guys cannot go too far downfield to continue their blocks. There is that “illegal man downfield” rule the OL guys can get caught breaking, which is being more than 3 yards downfield. A lineman might get away with being 4 or even 5 yards downfield, but the result is for them to pull up. THAT is the part of the RPO blocking scheme I dislike, which takes away some of the smash-mouth blocking style which is more punishing and more interesting to watch (to me anyway). (Side note – that might be required and end up as a rule change to reduce concussions from blocking in the trenches). At the end of the day, the RPO might become the next big thing in the NFL for the latter reason, but if not for that it might just come and go like wildcat plays. The reason RPO may not last for long in the NFL is for the simple reason that NFL defenders are more disciplined and know more about the game than HS and NCAA players, and NFL defensive coaches will find ways to limit the effectiveness of RPO offenses (e.g. attacking with interior & edge rushers).
 
I think there are more minuses for Vegas. Fans will have to travel a long distance. The local support base probably won't be strong enough, gambling issue is also a big one. it just seems like a weird fit even if they did have the city's blessing and the backing. I think it makes much more sense to re-locate the Raiders temporarily and get the new stadium built locally. Many 49ers fans can't stand their stadium being at Santa Clara.From what I have read the 49ers could have purchased land locally and had opportunities but decided not to. But everyone talks about how much they miss the old ground at Candlestick. Knowing how expensive San Francisco is now I'd say that relocating was the cheaper option and of course often money is the main clincher in a deal.
 
Yup, I think any NFL team in Vegas would be odd fit.

As for the NBA... the Finals are being so horribly officiated, and the games are being played so sloppy I could upchuck. So, here we are in the NFL thread.

NFL guaranteed money paid out per team since January 1 2016: The Iggles lead the way at nearly double the amount paid by the #2 team in guaranteed money payouts since January 1:
- Eagles: $280,254,834
- New York Giants: $140,873,332
- Washington Redskins: $114,366,332
- Baltimore Ravens: $114,366,332
- Jacksonville Jaguars: $103,858,261

Can you believe the top 3 teams in guaranteed money payouts are all in the NFC East? Well, the answer is probably "Yes". But what does that make the Cowboys? THE SMARTEST TEAM IN THE NFC EAST!!!
(Link for the details: http://espn.go.com/blog/statsinfo/post/_/id/119813/eagles-offseason-spending-far-outpaces-rest-of-nfl)

Other news:
- Bolts first round pick Joey Bosa holding out.
- Raves looking to trade 29 year old LT Eugene Monroe. Monroe has been injured much of the past two seasons, and drafted Notre Dame LOT Ronnie Stanley #6 overall. Monroe is in year 3 of a 5-year deal that would pay him $7.7M base in 2016. Releasing Monroe frees up $6.5M cap room but comes with $2.2M dead money per OverTheCap.com. Teams rumored to be interested: 9ers, Bears, Giants, Seahawks & Panthers. For Seattle, projected starting LOT Garry Gilliam and ROT J'Marcus Webb are out with minor injury.
 
Jared Goff having rough time learning Rams offense.
Rams' Keenum getting 1st team reps as designated starter, a bit like Wilson's rookie OTA's in Seattle.
The difference: Wilson did not have much trouble learning the system, and eventually earned 1st team reps.
http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000000670333/article/is-jared-goff-nowhere-near-being-ready-to-start
Looks like Foles is toast and not helping hisself by skipping OTA's. Unwise. Other teams who might be suitors for his services will take note of that. Crazy thing there, Foles just got paid a $6M roster bonus, and HC Jeff Fisher told Foles he's OK with Foles skipping.
 
on3m@n@rmy said:
Jared Goff having rough time learning Rams offense.
Rams' Keenum getting 1st team reps as designated starter, a bit like Wilson's rookie OTA's in Seattle.
The difference: Wilson did not have much trouble learning the system, and eventually earned 1st team reps.
http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000000670333/article/is-jared-goff-nowhere-near-being-ready-to-start
Looks like Foles is toast and not helping hisself by skipping OTA's. Unwise. Other teams who might be suitors for his services will take note of that. Crazy thing there, Foles just got paid a $6M roster bonus, and HC Jeff Fisher told Foles he's OK with Foles skipping.
Not surprised about Goff. But this is the whole argument about going all in for the number one draft pick and if Goff does not turn out to be a top line QB in the NFL it will be seen as a Rams fail for putting all of their eggs in the one basket. But it's early days yet for Goff. 49ers are supposed to be very happy with their rookie QB Driskel. Both the Rams and 49ers had terrible offensive records last year and they had a win each against each other. They are drawn to play in the first game of the new season and the 49ers have a horror schedule especially the first five games or so. I think they would like their chances against the Rams. But the Las Vegas bookies can't see them winning more than two games ! Be interesting to see if Chip Kelly can improve them in his first season.
 

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