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on3m@n@rmy - Having a formal education, even an graduate degree, does not make one smarter. There are more colleges and universities than ever before in this country, the world, and it's easier than ever before to get a degree. But that's a double edged sword, isn't it?

I do agree though that the fact that there is more access, and easier access, to information is going to help the curve of Millennials, and those beyond.

My primary concern, and I think Hitch brought this up, is I don't see the same work ethic and discipline in youths today that I did growing up. It's not as dire as some make it to be, but I do see it. I also see way too many young people who, if we fast forward 50 years are so, are going to look back with regret at the many hours of their life they spent on social media, and how much of their life it was. As Cliff Stoller wrote in Silicon Snake Oil, some 20+ years ago now, "Life in the real world is far more interesting, far more important, far richer, than anything you'll ever find on a screen." I fear we're raising a generation of people who are going to learn this the hard way, and I worry about the ancillary results as a society.
 
kingjr said:
Although you make some valid points I disagree with the notion that millenials are the weakest and dumbest generation. Suffice to say that you'll find someone in every generation who says that about his own. I'll abstain from making a snide remark about spelling and over-reliance on autocorrect features of our generation.
Dumbest maybe you have a point, every generation has dumb people.

But as far as weakest goes its not a case of picking a few bad apples in every generation but about noticing a pretty clear trend that in the US and the West no generation has been spoon fed and had everything given to them as much as millennials. Its not just a matter of perception. Anti depression prescriptions are increasing every year. Why? Because every generation, and ESPECIALLY the most recent ones, are getting weaker.

No generation has faced so little struggle and had as much protection from every little tiny potential problem life can throw at us. And im not just talking about real struggles like War (even the wars the US fought recently were smaller scale and limited to volunteers) or violence (on the decline), which are bad or food (all types of yummy and often unhealthy food available at click of fingers) or health (continously improving obviously). Much of these are bad but do also make people stronger because struggle makes people stronger; http://takimag.com/article/never_trust_anyone_who_hasnt_been_punched_in_the_face/print#axzz4jKWS2Stl
But with social media and internet young people don't even know what its like to be bored and to have to work towards something because when you are waiting at the doctors you just check celebrity news online. When you want sexual relief you look for porn. Television isn't a luxury you watch when the good programmes comes on at 9 but for 20 years now 5000 channels carry constant reruns of all the millenials favourite tv shows, and now you can find it all online too and theres just no need to do anything in life because everything gets given to you. Also the fact that more then ever we are totally seperated from nature - where we ultimately come from as a species and where we still get all our food. Our parents at least had grandparents who lived on farms who they visited in the summer and saw how to raise chickens and how to kill them and learnt practical life skills. Not so much for us.

Does that effect all millenials? Of course not. Theres hundreds of millions accross the west and many of tens of millions are tough normal people. But I feel I do have a good insight into the behaviour of millinials having been part of many social circles accross many different countries and ultimately most of the people in these social circles tend to behave a certain way and demonstrate many of the characteristics I believe are signs of emotional and mental weakness

And certainly I don't think any generation in the past ever had "safe spaces" and trigger warnings.


on3m@n@rmy said:
The Hitch said:
on3m@n@rmy said:
Here is the real truth in response to the ESPN Seth Wickersham article (link posted above) about Seattle's "locker room". [http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2017/06/06/doug-baldwin-seahawks-locker-room-is-different-that-makes-us-great/]
According to WR Doug Baldwin disputes within the locker room are about healthy competition, which makes the team better:
“I know that our locker room is different,” Baldwin said. “We have a lot of vibrant personalities that are not hesitant to share their emotions and their opinions, but that’s what makes us great. And Pete Carroll has embraced that environment, he’s made that environment. We celebrate individuality and he’s done a great job of handling those different personalities and giving us a platform to express ourselves because ultimately he feels that in doing so, that’s how we become the best version of ourselves on the football field.”

Baldwin said the ESPN article that portrayed problems between quarterback Russell Wilson and players on the defense hadn’t caused any problems on the team.

“There was no issues with the article because we’re a family. Yeah, we do argue, we do have disagreements, but at the end of the day, we know what we’re fighting for, we know we’re going in the same direction,” he said.
Some people just don't get that and I'll go out on a limb to say why I think the players get it, beyond Baldwin's explanation that Carroll created this environment. Players today are millenials, who think differently than older generations. First, on the whole millenials are smarter, more educated. That's a stat, a fact. Also, they tend to go with or side with whatever is best for the common good. Self need is generally more suppressed (except when it comes to player contracts, right? Lol). So it is no wonder that there can be diverse differences in opinion while the players still get on well. As Doug said, "going in the same direction". You still have to give credit to coach Carroll for embracing individuality, but the ingredients for that kind of environment are already present in the players.
As a millenial, I 100% disagree with your portrayal of millenials. We are the weakest dumbest ggeneration in some time. Of course that wont necessarily apply to nfl players, who are more likely to come from tougher backgrounds and obviously have better work ethic. But the generation as a whole is pathetic. And what to expect when most of us grow up with everything given to us on a plate and what's more access to all sorts of double edged luxuries through technology that no one has previously had. Most are unable to hold a conversation for 3 minutes without impulsively checking what food their friends posted they are eating on Facebook. STATS, do show that young people are far less likely to actually have real conversations especially with people older than them. The respect for older people is lacking ( a real sign of total ignorance) as many think they have figured out The world by The age of 20 and have nothing to learn from older people cod we are so smart. In fact let's ban all older people from voting seemingly half of millenials were posting after brexit, because how dare a old idea such as democracy stop our great generation from saving the world once and for all ( its easy. Your generations were just too dumb to figure it out). The american university system is being destroyed where free speech no longer exists.
Well, you can certainly disagree. But I will stand behind everything I said about millennials (in the USA OFC as I don't know what the situation is around the world) being smarter and more educated than previous generations in the USA. Here are some research results presented by a US-based research organization) to back up that fact:
Four-in-ten Millennial workers ages 25 to 29 had at least a bachelor’s degree in 2016, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of Current Population Survey data. That compares with 32% of Generation X workers and smaller shares of the Baby Boom and Silent generations when they were in the same age range.

In 2016, almost half (46%) of employed Millennial women ages 25 to 29 had a bachelor’s degree or more, up substantially from 36% of Gen X women workers when they were the same age in 2000. Millennial men in the workforce are also more likely to hold a bachelor’s degree than their Gen X counterparts were as young adults. Among employed men ages 25 to 29, the share of college graduates rose from 29% in 2000 to 36% in 2016 – a considerable increase, but still smaller than that seen among young women.
http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2017/05/16/todays-young-workers-are-more-likely-than-ever-to-have-a-bachelors-degree/

Had you been correct that millennials are weaker/dumber, then I'd just have to give coach Carroll more kudos for making such a diverse Seahawk environment so successful. ;)

As Kingjr said, you do have some valid points about the lacking interpersonal, speaking skills of millennials in face-to-face conversations. But that does not make them weak or dumb. It just means they have not developed those skills, probably because that has been replaced largely by electronic forms of communication. But they could develop those skills if they needed and wanted to.

As for the current millennials, I have two of my own; one daughter, and one son. Both in their early to middle 20's. As a linear-thinking scientific guy, I can vouch that they are both smarter than I am on social issues. Probably because they have lived it by seeing cohorts live it. I must say I have confidence in this millennial generation, primarily because of their resilience. That is my son's observation. He's working on his masters degree in secondary ed counseling, started his internship this Spring at a very low socio-economic school, and just hired on as the Varsity football OL and DL coach. Some of those kids have such bad home environments that they play football so they don't have to go home where they are mentally and physically abused (even by threat of death). Some of the stories would make your heart sink to your stomach, or cry. Yet, in spite of the bad home environments, he says these kids are surprisingly resilient.
Obviously people with bad backgrounds are resilient and tough. And football players especially are tough. These are the people who play with broken limbs and throw their heads into concussions on a regular basis.

the problem is the kids from good homes. They can still be tough of course, many navy seals come from comfortable backgrounds. But as a whole previous generations that came from good organic families still had some toughness to them, probably as a residue of what the parents endured. Far less for generation snowfkalke. When were we supposed to learn practically about the realities of the world, when the computers and television would just tell us them. But besides, Friends, was constantly rerunning and we had to check facebook and play video games as well so there wasnt as much time for that
 
Re:

Alpe d'Huez said:
on3m@n@rmy - Having a formal education, even an graduate degree, does not make one smarter. There are more colleges and universities than ever before in this country, the world, and it's easier than ever before to get a degree. But that's a double edged sword, isn't it?

I do agree though that the fact that there is more access, and easier access, to information is going to help the curve of Millennials, and those beyond.

My primary concern, and I think Hitch brought this up, is I don't see the same work ethic and discipline in youths today that I did growing up. It's not as dire as some make it to be, but I do see it. I also see way too many young people who, if we fast forward 50 years are so, are going to look back with regret at the many hours of their life they spent on social media, and how much of their life it was. As Cliff Stoller wrote in Silicon Snake Oil, some 20+ years ago now, "Life in the real world is far more interesting, far more important, far richer, than anything you'll ever find on a screen." I fear we're raising a generation of people who are going to learn this the hard way, and I worry about the ancillary results as a society.
Yes, thanks alpe, this was also a point I wanted to make. The fact that people finished university doesn't mean they are smart. Its more about access and going through the hoops. I know dumb people that finished university. To be honest I would count myself amongst them, having really done nothing special besides go through the easy hoops that anyone could do, to get my degree.

I'm also 1 of the people who thinks university is overrated. That they charge in the us as much as they do is a scam. I once heard someone say "people complain that they don't have access to a university scholarship but the libraries are free". Damn right. Learning is a lifelong process.
 
Re:

Alpe d'Huez said:
on3m@n@rmy - Having a formal education, even an graduate degree, does not make one smarter. There are more colleges and universities than ever before in this country, the world, and it's easier than ever before to get a degree. But that's a double edged sword, isn't it?

I do agree though that the fact that there is more access, and easier access, to information is going to help the curve of Millennials, and those beyond.

My primary concern, and I think Hitch brought this up, is I don't see the same work ethic and discipline in youths today that I did growing up. It's not as dire as some make it to be, but I do see it. I also see way too many young people who, if we fast forward 50 years are so, are going to look back with regret at the many hours of their life they spent on social media, and how much of their life it was. As Cliff Stoller wrote in Silicon Snake Oil, some 20+ years ago now, "Life in the real world is far more interesting, far more important, far richer, than anything you'll ever find on a screen." I fear we're raising a generation of people who are going to learn this the hard way, and I worry about the ancillary results as a society.

This. Everything else is on point as well. Hats off. Couldn't have said it better.
 
Re: Re:

The Hitch said:
Alpe d'Huez said:
on3m@n@rmy - Having a formal education, even an graduate degree, does not make one smarter. There are more colleges and universities than ever before in this country, the world, and it's easier than ever before to get a degree. But that's a double edged sword, isn't it?

I do agree though that the fact that there is more access, and easier access, to information is going to help the curve of Millennials, and those beyond.

My primary concern, and I think Hitch brought this up, is I don't see the same work ethic and discipline in youths today that I did growing up. It's not as dire as some make it to be, but I do see it. I also see way too many young people who, if we fast forward 50 years are so, are going to look back with regret at the many hours of their life they spent on social media, and how much of their life it was. As Cliff Stoller wrote in Silicon Snake Oil, some 20+ years ago now, "Life in the real world is far more interesting, far more important, far richer, than anything you'll ever find on a screen." I fear we're raising a generation of people who are going to learn this the hard way, and I worry about the ancillary results as a society.
Yes, thanks alpe, this was also a point I wanted to make. The fact that people finished university doesn't mean they are smart. Its more about access and going through the hoops. I know dumb people that finished university. To be honest I would count myself amongst them, having really done nothing special besides go through the easy hoops that anyone could do, to get my degree. I have heard that grades tend to be inflated. I don't know if that is true or not. But even if true I would think the level of effort to get the degree is still significant.

I'm also 1 of the people who thinks university is overrated. That they charge in the us as much as they do is a scam. I once heard someone say "people complain that they don't have access to a university scholarship but the libraries are free". Damn right. Learning is a lifelong process.
Now all of that I can agree with. A degree does not make one smart or smarter. So I stand corrected on that, which is not what I meant in the first place. Still, the degree ends up helping one become more educated. No? Plus, that was a very good point about possibly looking back with regrets, and the point Stoller made.

As for work ethic, that was not part of my original point, so I have nothing to debate on that. Besides, I really have no feel for whether or not work ethic in the workplace is poorer than it used to be. My gut feel though is while there are more universities worldwide, which creates more opportunity to get a degree (hence easier as you say Alpe), it seems logical the level of effort or work required to get the degree is still significant for many fields, so as to not discredit the achievement of getting the degree.

Anyway, all of that discussion is a big rabbit trail from my original point, which I will reword as this (which is just my take on the Seattle situation, which may or may not be correct):
Players today are millennials, who think differently than older generations. First, on the whole millennials are more educated. That's a stat, a fact. Also, they tend to go with or side with whatever is best for the common good. Self need is generally more suppressed (except when it comes to player contracts, right? Lol). So it is no wonder that there can be diverse differences in opinion while the players still get on well. And while coach Carroll should get some credit for the environment that he has helped create, the ingredients for that kind of environment are already present in the players.
 
RE: college education and/or degree. In the USA we push a college degree as the holy grail. To that end, kids are effectively required to go to college. The problem is that many of those degrees are in areas that there are no jobs. What does a History major do if they aren't teaching? I recently watched an evening show that had Boston Whaler on one segment, and they can't get the employees they need to fulfill their boat orders. Before I ramble OT any further, millennials are new creature, but we have set them up for failure.
 
Oct 6, 2009
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Are we allowed to talk about Michael Oher's Instagram post here, or does it have to go in the clinic? (Prescription meds for concussion, not tradtional PEDs)
 
Re:

Beech Mtn said:
Are we allowed to talk about Michael Oher's Instagram post here, or does it have to go in the clinic? (Prescription meds for concussion, not tradtional PEDs)
I don't know why not. We have talked about PED use in football (NFL, college, & HS) here in this thread. I'd like to know more about the Oher situation. It sounds crazy. 10 pill bottles - just for the brain. What the?
http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2714702-michael-oher-deletes-instagram-post-appearing-to-show-pills-all-for-the-brain
Please do tell.
 
Oct 6, 2009
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Guy's been on the concussion protocol for something like 8 months, presumably with very good medical oversight of the situation. I saw some fan's speculation that maybe these are empty bottles he has saved. Hope he's not still having to take that many different things 8 months out. Was more wondering what is a "normal" amount of meds and prognosis, given that concussions are of different severity, and Oher's obviously looks like a pretty bad one.

Not a doctor, but it seems to me like he shouldn't come back to football, although he's been working out in the weight room and trying/hoping.
 
Re: Re:

on3m@n@rmy said:
Beech Mtn said:
Are we allowed to talk about Michael Oher's Instagram post here, or does it have to go in the clinic? (Prescription meds for concussion, not tradtional PEDs)
I don't know why not. We have talked about PED use in football (NFL, college, & HS) here in this thread. I'd like to know more about the Oher situation. It sounds crazy. 10 pill bottles - just for the brain. What the?
http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2714702-michael-oher-deletes-instagram-post-appearing-to-show-pills-all-for-the-brain
Please do tell.
This image does not contain much information. It could be 8 different pills, many pills of 3 types or a combination. Given that drugs are usually measured in dosage per kilogram or something similar, his 300+lb body might require a lot of pills to get to a therapeutic dose.

There is really nothing to see here unless we can see what types and dosages he takes.
 
Re: Re:

on3m@n@rmy said:
Beech Mtn said:
Are we allowed to talk about Michael Oher's Instagram post here, or does it have to go in the clinic? (Prescription meds for concussion, not tradtional PEDs)
I don't know why not. We have talked about PED use in football (NFL, college, & HS) here in this thread. I'd like to know more about the Oher situation. It sounds crazy. 10 pill bottles - just for the brain. What the?
http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2714702-michael-oher-deletes-instagram-post-appearing-to-show-pills-all-for-the-brain
Please do tell.
Well they are for the brain if he's addicted ...............
 
Re: Re:

ToreBear said:
on3m@n@rmy said:
Beech Mtn said:
Are we allowed to talk about Michael Oher's Instagram post here, or does it have to go in the clinic? (Prescription meds for concussion, not tradtional PEDs)
I don't know why not. We have talked about PED use in football (NFL, college, & HS) here in this thread. I'd like to know more about the Oher situation. It sounds crazy. 10 pill bottles - just for the brain. What the?
http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2714702-michael-oher-deletes-instagram-post-appearing-to-show-pills-all-for-the-brain
Please do tell.
This image does not contain much information. It could be 8 different pills, many pills of 3 types or a combination. Given that drugs are usually measured in dosage per kilogram or something similar, his 300+lb body might require a lot of pills to get to a therapeutic dose.

There is really nothing to see here unless we can see what types and dosages he takes.
For sure. I posted that hoping Beech Mtn could add some info, though that is a long shot since the image of the bottles was posted on Instagram by Oher, which he later deleted. Maybe the image was a joke Oher played. Maybe it was not real. Maybe the pills were not for concussion.

I personally know several HS and college players who had to quit the sport on neurosurgeon's recommendation after sustaining serious concussions. The worst possible outcome one neurosurgeon warned of? "You might die if you keep playing". So when I saw that lineup of bottles Oher posted I became a little concerned.
 
Oct 6, 2009
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So did I. And it didn't look to me like he did it as a joke, or that Monroe took it as a joke either, based on his reply.
 
I sometimes wondered why former Seattle RB Curt Warner disappeared from public view after his retirement from the NFL. Warner was undoubtedly the best RB in Seattle history prior to Marshawn Lynch, and he had different talents but as much talent as Lynch. He probably would have been a HOFer had his career not been cut short by injuries (6 surgeries in 8 NFL years, including a serious ACL injury that he never really fully recovered from). So a player so important to and loved by fans to just disappear was curious to me. Turns out, he had good reason in dealing with 2 autistic twins. He has said just keeping his home repaired was a full time job. His name has recently come up as the life of the Warner family is settling down some as the twins have aged, and with news he is writing a book (with writer Dave Boling, formerly with the Tacoma News Tribune) about his experiences raising autistic twins. John Clayton, formerly ESPN, interviewed Curt on June 7. The podcast is a bit over 21 minutes, and covers a lot of history but the discussion on autism starts at minute 18:00 of the podcast. Here is the link to the podcast:
http://sports.mynorthwest.com/category/podcast_player/?a=10019396&sid=1145&n=SCHOOLED+with+The+Professor
Aspergers, a high functioning level of autism, reminds of the movie "The Accountant" starring Ben Afflect. I thought it was entertaining and gave some insight about autism.
 
Jul 4, 2009
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Re:

movingtarget said:
....and there is this....so I guess the question is, is Kaep's non-signing a function of his unpopularity, and at base what is that unpopularity a function of.....did I hear someone say Phil Donahue ? or The Dixie Chicks....?....

San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick was voted the NFL's most disliked player, according to a recent poll conducted by E-Poll Marketing Research.

The poll asked 1,100 Americans which of more than 350 NFL players they disliked the most
https://www.si.com/nfl/2016/09/22/san-francisco-49ers-colin-kaepernick-most-disliked-player

Cheers
 
Re:

movingtarget said:
Strange events with Kaepernick: Last year he wouldn't agree to restructure his contract and take a pay cut to play for the Broncos. With Sanchez getting dumped in the preseason and Lynch in no way ready to start, Keap would have gone head to head with Siemian for the starting job. At the least, he would have been the backup and started the two games that Siemian missed due to injury. But instead he stayed & played for a team that has no chance at all of making the playoffs anytime soon, which he opted out of his contact this year anyway. And now a year later, Elway's changed his tune and isn't sure if Kaep can still play in the league:

http://den.247sports.com/Bolt/John-Elway-not-sure-if-Colin-Kaepernick-can-still-play-in-NFL-52067786
 
Re: Re:

blutto said:
movingtarget said:
....and there is this....so I guess the question is, is Kaep's non-signing a function of his unpopularity, and at base what is that unpopularity a function of.....did I hear someone say Phil Donahue ? or The Dixie Chicks....?....

San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick was voted the NFL's most disliked player, according to a recent poll conducted by E-Poll Marketing Research.

The poll asked 1,100 Americans which of more than 350 NFL players they disliked the most
https://www.si.com/nfl/2016/09/22/san-francisco-49ers-colin-kaepernick-most-disliked-player

Cheers
The problem with a poll like that is that most USAers only know the players in the news. Kaep was in the news a lot, mostly with a negative slant. So the poll isn't out of 350 players, its out of less than 10. Plus, 1,100 is a tiny sample (maybe none of them were actually football fans). I wonder what the poll would look like if you asked 50,000 football fans. Speaking for myself only, I don't dislike him, nor do I care that he took a knee for the national anthem. He's a top 40 QB in the league, but more importantly, I would want him on my scout team.

EDIT: From the linked NYT article: "Last month, he had the 17th best-selling jersey in the N.F.L."
 
Re: Re:

jmdirt said:
blutto said:
movingtarget said:
....and there is this....so I guess the question is, is Kaep's non-signing a function of his unpopularity, and at base what is that unpopularity a function of.....did I hear someone say Phil Donahue ? or The Dixie Chicks....?....

San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick was voted the NFL's most disliked player, according to a recent poll conducted by E-Poll Marketing Research.

The poll asked 1,100 Americans which of more than 350 NFL players they disliked the most
https://www.si.com/nfl/2016/09/22/san-francisco-49ers-colin-kaepernick-most-disliked-player

Cheers
The problem with a poll like that is that most USAers only know the players in the news. Kaep was in the news a lot, mostly with a negative slant. So the poll isn't out of 350 players, its out of less than 10. Plus, 1,100 is a tiny sample (maybe none of them were actually football fans). I wonder what the poll would look like if you asked 50,000 football fans. Speaking for myself only, I don't dislike him, nor do I care that he took a knee for the national anthem. He's a top 40 QB in the league, but more importantly, I would want him on my scout team.
From all the debate and articles I have read about Kaepernick it seems that many of the players and coaches are sympathetic and even the fans seem to be split with quite a lot supporting him but it's a different matter with the team owners and the NFL heavyweights. Shanahan made it clear this year that Kaep wasn't going to be part of his squad and he is a very different type of QB to Hoyer. Kaep himself said he's not simply wanting a starter's job and he would settle for a back up position but with all of the rumors flying around and Kaepernick staying silent for quite a while now about what sort of position he would find acceptable, I don't think he is doing himself any favors and the fact that he also said he was ending his protest when he wasn't getting any offers also just increased the cynicism some people have about his whole political stance. Quite a few people now including NFL pundits and media and former players seem to think he will never play another game in the NFL. He made a huge mistake not taking the Denver job for a sizeable pay cut because at that point the writing was already on the wall at the 49ers with Gabbert starting and Kaep injured and rehabbing and the 49ers were even worse the year after with Chip Kelly. That was the perfect time to go for a fresh start and with Denver having their own QB issues. Elway proved to be right about how much to pay him but he was willing to give him a chance but I don't think Kaep could see past the pay cut plus Chip Kelly was talking about how he was looking forward to signing on with Kaep so he probably thought the new coach was going to be good for him but the problem was the team was worse.

Kaep was hot and cold performance wise but with that offense not many QBs would have done much better. When Jed York decided to wipe the slate clean and replace the GM and the coach and all of the coordinators that was pretty much it for Kaep at the 49ers but by opting out he left it too late and he was copping a lot of the blame for the two win season unfairly or not. The problem was that the games where he did play well, the 49ers still couldn't get the win. I am starting to think now that maybe only early season injuries gets him signed and it won't be a popular signing, someone will have to take a leap of faith and convince their management and it will probably only be a one year contract for not much money. Struggling teams don't need any further distractions and the more successful teams won't risk it. Possibly only a Teddy Bridgewater type situation could see him signed.
 
Re: Re:

Nomad said:
movingtarget said:
Strange events with Kaepernick: Last year he wouldn't agree to restructure his contract and take a pay cut to play for the Broncos. With Sanchez getting dumped in the preseason and Lynch in no way ready to start, Keap would have gone head to head with Siemian for the starting job. At the least, he would have been the backup and started the two games that Siemian missed due to injury. But instead he stayed & played for a team that has no chance at all of making the playoffs anytime soon, which he opted out of his contact this year anyway. And now a year later, Elway's changed his tune and isn't sure if Kaep can still play in the league:

http://den.247sports.com/Bolt/John-Elway-not-sure-if-Colin-Kaepernick-can-still-play-in-NFL-52067786
Kaepernick and his agents haven't handled things well. He parted ways with his previous agent before he opted out. Elways seems to have more doubts than he did 18 months ago.
 
Re: Re:

movingtarget said:
jmdirt said:
blutto said:
movingtarget said:
....and there is this....so I guess the question is, is Kaep's non-signing a function of his unpopularity, and at base what is that unpopularity a function of.....did I hear someone say Phil Donahue ? or The Dixie Chicks....?....

San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick was voted the NFL's most disliked player, according to a recent poll conducted by E-Poll Marketing Research.

The poll asked 1,100 Americans which of more than 350 NFL players they disliked the most
https://www.si.com/nfl/2016/09/22/san-francisco-49ers-colin-kaepernick-most-disliked-player

Cheers
The problem with a poll like that is that most USAers only know the players in the news. Kaep was in the news a lot, mostly with a negative slant. So the poll isn't out of 350 players, its out of less than 10. Plus, 1,100 is a tiny sample (maybe none of them were actually football fans). I wonder what the poll would look like if you asked 50,000 football fans. Speaking for myself only, I don't dislike him, nor do I care that he took a knee for the national anthem. He's a top 40 QB in the league, but more importantly, I would want him on my scout team.
From all the debate and articles I have read about Kaepernick it seems that many of the players and coaches are sympathetic and even the fans seem to be split with quite a lot supporting him but it's a different matter with the team owners and the NFL heavyweights. Shanahan made it clear this year that Kaep wasn't going to be part of his squad and he is a very different type of QB to Hoyer. Kaep himself said he's not simply wanting a starter's job and he would settle for a back up position but with all of the rumors flying around and Kaepernick staying silent for quite a while now about what sort of position he would find acceptable, I don't think he is doing himself any favors and the fact that he also said he was ending his protest when he wasn't getting any offers also just increased the cynicism some people have about his whole political stance. Quite a few people now including NFL pundits and media and former players seem to think he will never play another game in the NFL. He made a huge mistake not taking the Denver job for a sizeable pay cut because at that point the writing was already on the wall at the 49ers with Gabbert starting and Kaep injured and rehabbing and the 49ers were even worse the year after with Chip Kelly. That was the perfect time to go for a fresh start and with Denver having their own QB issues. Elway proved to be right about how much to pay him but he was willing to give him a chance but I don't think Kaep could see past the pay cut plus Chip Kelly was talking about how he was looking forward to signing on with Kaep so he probably thought the new coach was going to be good for him but the problem was the team was worse.

Kaep was hot and cold performance wise but with that offense not many QBs would have done much better. When Jed York decided to wipe the slate clean and replace the GM and the coach and all of the coordinators that was pretty much it for Kaep at the 49ers but by opting out he left it too late and he was copping a lot of the blame for the two win season unfairly or not. The problem was that the games where he did play well, the 49ers still couldn't get the win. I am starting to think now that maybe only early season injuries gets him signed and it won't be a popular signing, someone will have to take a leap of faith and convince their management and it will probably only be a one year contract for not much money. Struggling teams don't need any further distractions and the more successful teams won't risk it. Possibly only a Teddy Bridgewater type situation could see him signed.
If he plays and wins some games all will be forgotten! :D
 
That's a good article.

I posted before I think a solid team with a good PR department could actually make use of him. A team knowing the distraction is coming, can corral that and if he's open to some media coaching, can turn it into at least attention, which likely won't be met with much negative publicity. Put another way, he's ended his protest, and wants to play. Anywhere he goes he's going to sit on the bench as a backup. The cameras will find him all the time, and he'll have microphones stuffed into his face, But since he's a fairly well spoken guy, he can use this to talk about the team, and other players, and mostly divert political issues to others to discuss. If he doesn't like a question asked, he can always answer, "I'm here to play football."

Look what happened when Michael Vick was signed by the Eagles at a cut rate. There were a lot of people protesting. But he focused on football, didn't play great, or terrible, and in the end it all was a wash.
 
Re: Re:

blutto said:
movingtarget said:
....and there is this....so I guess the question is, is Kaep's non-signing a function of his unpopularity, and at base what is that unpopularity a function of.....did I hear someone say Phil Donahue ? or The Dixie Chicks....?....

San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick was voted the NFL's most disliked player, according to a recent poll conducted by E-Poll Marketing Research.

The poll asked 1,100 Americans which of more than 350 NFL players they disliked the most
https://www.si.com/nfl/2016/09/22/san-francisco-49ers-colin-kaepernick-most-disliked-player

Cheers

I remember how 10-15 years ago it was almost treasonous to be critical of conservatives, particularly in regards to the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, and to the gun laws.

Had Kaepernick done this during the Bush years, he would have been slaughtered (not literally), in the media and around the league. He may be getting criticism, but back then he would have been seen as a pariah, kind of like Donahue, as you mentioned and also Cindy Sheehan. Anyone that spoke out against the government then was essentially seen as 'anti-American,' and not just by the conservatives, but by some liberals as well.
 

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