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I agree with all that. He's not even trying to spin it. He could easily find any number of reporters, some former players or coaches, who would have a sympathetic ear, ask pertinent questions, and let him talk without grilling him. Tony Dungee comes to mind. Deion Sanders as well.

I found an article from last month where Kyle Shanahan explains why RG3 isn't getting much interest, and the same theories apply to Kaepernick. [I'm going to edit his quote here, for brevity]

"When you look at all of these quarterbacks...are you going to put a system together that gives them their best chance to be successful? You've got to make sure you tailor an offense that fits his skill set. That's tough to do when a guy's not your for-sure starter because it's not just about him. It's about the O-line, it's about the running backs, it's about the receivers and it's certainly tough to design an offense around a quarterback when he's competing to be your backup."

I think what really hurt RG3 was when last year in Cleveland he said he wanted to be much more of a pocket passer, and that he told Washington that after he was hurt there. But with the Browns, he frequently took off and ran, and often got hit when running. I don't recall Kaep saying he was going to be a drop back pocket QB, but last season he too often scrambled around and ran.

This to me validates Shanahan's theory. Unless your offense is already somewhat close to what can work with this QB (Kaep to Seattle?), why would you take them? And for this reason, where is RG3 to go? Somewhere where you're ready to have him injured after playing just a few games?

http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/news/kyle-shanahan-explains-why-robert-griffin-iii-is-having-trouble-finding-nfl-work/
 
That makes sense Alpe. Its probably best to have your starter and back up be similar in style and skills. As with everything though, there are exceptions: ie: Cowboys were built for Romo, but easily shifted to Dak.

That also reminds me of a commentary that I heard last year about Maziel. They were discussing how to make him successful in an offense, and one of them suggested having beer and strippers in the huddle. :lol:
 
Why should Kaepernick have to “help himself”? Do other QBs seeking jobs make statements or give interviews? Why the double standard? He has a more than adequate track record of play in the NFL, play that for the most part has been longer and better than that any backup QB with a job can claim, why isn’t that enough?

And does anyone seriously think it would make any difference if he did give an interview? Are owners going to say, oh, he’s a great guy, I never knew that before, I guess I don’t care about the pledge to the flag any more, let’s hire him? Sort of like Pete Carroll, who as a coach had to game plan against Kaepernick more than half a dozen times, suddenly discovering, on the basis of one tryout, that he was actually too good to be a backup? When everyone passing on Kaepernick is rationalizing his decision with chickensh!t excuses, what would be the point in his making any effort to talk to anyone?

I also think the notion that he’s a poor fit for most teams because he isn’t a classic pocket passer is another weak excuse. Michael Vick, who did far, far worse than not standing for the flag, was not a pocket passer, and he got another chance. Kaepernick is not at his best in a classic offense, but he’s still better at that than many of the guys who have actually been hired as backups. Put him into a system designed around whoever the starter is, and he will be adequate. I don’t recall Harbaugh’s being concerned that Kaepernick couldn’t back up Alex Smith. On the contrary, when Kaepernick got his first start after Smith went down with concussion, Harbaugh didn’t treat him gently with a lot of running plays, he had him throwing downfield from the get-go. And when Kaep became established as the starter, there was no problem with Smith backing him up. When Smith was traded, the team acquired other backups who didn’t have Kaep’s particular skill set.

What Kaepernick needs to succeed are a couple of very good receivers. When both Crabtree and Davis were healthy, he was great with the 49ers. When one of them was out, he struggled. He isn’t good at progressions, that’s been well documented, and then he panics and starts running. But when he has a couple of good receivers who he can count on, he’s reasonably comfortable in the pocket and thrives.

The bottom line is we all know that if Kaepernick hadn’t protested by sitting at the pledge before games, he would have offers as a backup, and no one would be talking about his deficiencies as a pocket passer. All backup QBs have deficiencies, that’s why they’re backups. You can make the comparison to RGIII, but he never played well after his rookie season, and constantly got injured from running. And in fact, RGIII did get a job at Cleveland, at a time when his track record and future prognosis were quite a bit worse than what Kaepernick’s are now.
 
Merckx index said:
Why should Kaepernick have to “help himself”? Do other QBs seeking jobs make statements or give interviews? Why the double standard? He has a more than adequate track record of play in the NFL, play that for the most part has been longer and better than that any backup QB with a job can claim, why isn’t that enough?

And does anyone seriously think it would make any difference if he did give an interview? Are owners going to say, oh, he’s a great guy, I never knew that before, I guess I don’t care about the pledge to the flag any more, let’s hire him? Sort of like Pete Carroll, who as a coach had to game plan against Kaepernick more than half a dozen times, suddenly discovering, on the basis of one tryout, that he was actually too good to be a backup? When everyone passing on Kaepernick is rationalizing his decision with chickensh!t excuses, what would be the point in his making any effort to talk to anyone?

I also think the notion that he’s a poor fit for most teams because he isn’t a classic pocket passer is another weak excuse. Michael Vick, who did far, far worse than not standing for the flag, was not a pocket passer, and he got another chance. Kaepernick is not at his best in a classic offense, but he’s still better at that than many of the guys who have actually been hired as backups. Put him into a system designed around whoever the starter is, and he will be adequate. I don’t recall Harbaugh’s being concerned that Kaepernick couldn’t back up Alex Smith. On the contrary, when Kaepernick got his first start after Smith went down with concussion, Harbaugh didn’t treat him gently with a lot of running plays, he had him throwing downfield from the get-go. And when Kaep became established as the starter, there was no problem with Smith backing him up. When Smith was traded, the team acquired other backups who didn’t have Kaep’s particular skill set.

What Kaepernick needs to succeed are a couple of very good receivers. When both Crabtree and Davis were healthy, he was great with the 49ers. When one of them was out, he struggled. He isn’t good at progressions, that’s been well documented, and then he panics and starts running. But when he has a couple of good receivers who he can count on, he’s reasonably comfortable in the pocket and thrives.

The bottom line is we all know that if Kaepernick hadn’t protested by sitting at the pledge before games, he would have offers as a backup, and no one would be talking about his deficiencies as a pocket passer. All backup QBs have deficiencies, that’s why they’re backups. You can make the comparison to RGIII, but he never played well after his rookie season, and constantly got injured from running. And in fact, RGIII did get a job at Cleveland, at a time when his track record and future prognosis were quite a bit worse than what Kaepernick’s are now.
He shouldn't have to help himself but the situation he is in is unique as far as the politics and media attention goes. I doubt that even Brady had the media spotlight on him as much as Kaep did last year in a team that went 2-14. He doesn't have the injury issues that RGIII has had or Romo before he retired and I 'm surprised that a team like the Jets didn't show interest even the Cardinals have taken Gabbert as a back up or he will be competing with others for a back up job. I still think it's possible he could find a position but some seem adamant that he has played his last game in the NFL which is unfair when you compare him to most of the back ups and one or two of the starters. But it seems that Chip Kelly who was also a casualty from the 49ers last season could also struggle to find another position in the NFL.
 
movingtarget said:
Merckx index said:
Why should Kaepernick have to “help himself”? Do other QBs seeking jobs make statements or give interviews? Why the double standard? He has a more than adequate track record of play in the NFL, play that for the most part has been longer and better than that any backup QB with a job can claim, why isn’t that enough?

And does anyone seriously think it would make any difference if he did give an interview? Are owners going to say, oh, he’s a great guy, I never knew that before, I guess I don’t care about the pledge to the flag any more, let’s hire him? Sort of like Pete Carroll, who as a coach had to game plan against Kaepernick more than half a dozen times, suddenly discovering, on the basis of one tryout, that he was actually too good to be a backup? When everyone passing on Kaepernick is rationalizing his decision with chickensh!t excuses, what would be the point in his making any effort to talk to anyone?

I also think the notion that he’s a poor fit for most teams because he isn’t a classic pocket passer is another weak excuse. Michael Vick, who did far, far worse than not standing for the flag, was not a pocket passer, and he got another chance. Kaepernick is not at his best in a classic offense, but he’s still better at that than many of the guys who have actually been hired as backups. Put him into a system designed around whoever the starter is, and he will be adequate. I don’t recall Harbaugh’s being concerned that Kaepernick couldn’t back up Alex Smith. On the contrary, when Kaepernick got his first start after Smith went down with concussion, Harbaugh didn’t treat him gently with a lot of running plays, he had him throwing downfield from the get-go. And when Kaep became established as the starter, there was no problem with Smith backing him up. When Smith was traded, the team acquired other backups who didn’t have Kaep’s particular skill set.

What Kaepernick needs to succeed are a couple of very good receivers. When both Crabtree and Davis were healthy, he was great with the 49ers. When one of them was out, he struggled. He isn’t good at progressions, that’s been well documented, and then he panics and starts running. But when he has a couple of good receivers who he can count on, he’s reasonably comfortable in the pocket and thrives.

The bottom line is we all know that if Kaepernick hadn’t protested by sitting at the pledge before games, he would have offers as a backup, and no one would be talking about his deficiencies as a pocket passer. All backup QBs have deficiencies, that’s why they’re backups. You can make the comparison to RGIII, but he never played well after his rookie season, and constantly got injured from running. And in fact, RGIII did get a job at Cleveland, at a time when his track record and future prognosis were quite a bit worse than what Kaepernick’s are now.
He shouldn't have to help himself but the situation he is in is unique as far as the politics and media attention goes. I doubt that even Brady had the media spotlight on him as much as Kaep did last year in a team that went 2-14. He doesn't have the injury issues that RGIII has had or Romo before he retired and I 'm surprised that a team like the Jets didn't show interest even the Cardinals have taken Gabbert as a back up or he will be competing with others for a back up job. I still think it's possible he could find a position but some seem adamant that he has played his last game in the NFL which is unfair when you compare him to most of the back ups and one or two of the starters. But it seems that Chip Kelly who was also a casualty from the 49ers last season could also struggle to find another position in the NFL.
It is truely a puzzling situation for Kap. But I agree with movingtarget's assessment.

As for Kap's visit to Seattle, Seattle actually did not work him out. It was just a visit where he and the Seattle organization discussed some things. Seattle knew prior to that meeting that he was better than just a backup. Nothing has been said by Seattle exactly what was discussed. Carroll simply said it was just a chance to learn some things about Kap, and that he's a starter in this league. My GUESS is Seattle wanted to find out if he'd be willing to backup Wilson indefinately, considering current backup Boykin has had multiple off field issues. Less likely but still possible is Carroll was doing Kap a friendly favor to try and initiate some interest in Kap by other teams, but I really doubt that was Seattle's motive for the visit. Nice try by Seattle to see if he'd be a willing backup, but I can almost guarantee Kap wants to be a starter.

I also agree with MI the political reason (Kap sitting for the NA) is mainly why he's not getting offers now.
 
Re:

Back to Oher's concussion...
Beech Mtn said:
Guy's been on the concussion protocol for something like 8 months, presumably with very good medical oversight of the situation. I saw some fan's speculation that maybe these are empty bottles he has saved. Hope he's not still having to take that many different things 8 months out. Was more wondering what is a "normal" amount of meds and prognosis, given that concussions are of different severity, and Oher's obviously looks like a pretty bad one.

Not a doctor, but it seems to me like he shouldn't come back to football, although he's been working out in the weight room and trying/hoping.
It sounds like it's becoming more likely his playing days are over. http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2017/06/19/still-recovering-from-a-concussion-michael-oher-may-soon-get-cut/
http://www.charlotteobserver.com/sports/nfl/carolina-panthers/article156865999.html
 
Re: Re:

on3m@n@rmy said:
Back to Oher's concussion...
Beech Mtn said:
Guy's been on the concussion protocol for something like 8 months, presumably with very good medical oversight of the situation. I saw some fan's speculation that maybe these are empty bottles he has saved. Hope he's not still having to take that many different things 8 months out. Was more wondering what is a "normal" amount of meds and prognosis, given that concussions are of different severity, and Oher's obviously looks like a pretty bad one.

Not a doctor, but it seems to me like he shouldn't come back to football, although he's been working out in the weight room and trying/hoping.
It sounds like it's becoming more likely his playing days are over. http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2017/06/19/still-recovering-from-a-concussion-michael-oher-may-soon-get-cut/
http://www.charlotteobserver.com/sports/nfl/carolina-panthers/article156865999.html
Concussions are being taken more seriously in most sports now which can only be a good thing. A concussion this bad will probably be career ending. I remember the shocking post race interview with Chris Horner after a Tour stage about five years ago when the interviewer asked him about his crash and Horner didn't even remember crashing and completed the stage on auto pilot. Even during the interview he was confused and disoriented. Just as well there were no mountain descents that day.
 
Merckx index said:
Why should Kaepernick have to “help himself”? Do other QBs seeking jobs make statements or give interviews? Why the double standard? He has a more than adequate track record of play in the NFL, play that for the most part has been longer and better than that any backup QB with a job can claim, why isn’t that enough?

And does anyone seriously think it would make any difference if he did give an interview? Are owners going to say, oh, he’s a great guy, I never knew that before, I guess I don’t care about the pledge to the flag any more, let’s hire him? Sort of like Pete Carroll, who as a coach had to game plan against Kaepernick more than half a dozen times, suddenly discovering, on the basis of one tryout, that he was actually too good to be a backup? When everyone passing on Kaepernick is rationalizing his decision with chickensh!t excuses, what would be the point in his making any effort to talk to anyone?

I also think the notion that he’s a poor fit for most teams because he isn’t a classic pocket passer is another weak excuse. Michael Vick, who did far, far worse than not standing for the flag, was not a pocket passer, and he got another chance. Kaepernick is not at his best in a classic offense, but he’s still better at that than many of the guys who have actually been hired as backups. Put him into a system designed around whoever the starter is, and he will be adequate. I don’t recall Harbaugh’s being concerned that Kaepernick couldn’t back up Alex Smith. On the contrary, when Kaepernick got his first start after Smith went down with concussion, Harbaugh didn’t treat him gently with a lot of running plays, he had him throwing downfield from the get-go. And when Kaep became established as the starter, there was no problem with Smith backing him up. When Smith was traded, the team acquired other backups who didn’t have Kaep’s particular skill set.

What Kaepernick needs to succeed are a couple of very good receivers. When both Crabtree and Davis were healthy, he was great with the 49ers. When one of them was out, he struggled. He isn’t good at progressions, that’s been well documented, and then he panics and starts running. But when he has a couple of good receivers who he can count on, he’s reasonably comfortable in the pocket and thrives.

The bottom line is we all know that if Kaepernick hadn’t protested by sitting at the pledge before games, he would have offers as a backup, and no one would be talking about his deficiencies as a pocket passer. All backup QBs have deficiencies, that’s why they’re backups. You can make the comparison to RGIII, but he never played well after his rookie season, and constantly got injured from running. And in fact, RGIII did get a job at Cleveland, at a time when his track record and future prognosis were quite a bit worse than what Kaepernick’s are now.
My thinking is that he would be a better fit in a team that took advantage of his mobility through their O scheme. Every QB will do better in an offense that is built around their skill set.

I already typed this above somewhere, I don't care about his taking a knee for the pregame ritual, I think he is still a top 40 (if he get his mojo, top 20) NFL QB, and I would want him on my scout team (he probably wouldn't do that but...).
 
jmdirt said:
Merckx index said:
Why should Kaepernick have to “help himself”? Do other QBs seeking jobs make statements or give interviews? Why the double standard? He has a more than adequate track record of play in the NFL, play that for the most part has been longer and better than that any backup QB with a job can claim, why isn’t that enough?

And does anyone seriously think it would make any difference if he did give an interview? Are owners going to say, oh, he’s a great guy, I never knew that before, I guess I don’t care about the pledge to the flag any more, let’s hire him? Sort of like Pete Carroll, who as a coach had to game plan against Kaepernick more than half a dozen times, suddenly discovering, on the basis of one tryout, that he was actually too good to be a backup? When everyone passing on Kaepernick is rationalizing his decision with chickensh!t excuses, what would be the point in his making any effort to talk to anyone?

I also think the notion that he’s a poor fit for most teams because he isn’t a classic pocket passer is another weak excuse. Michael Vick, who did far, far worse than not standing for the flag, was not a pocket passer, and he got another chance. Kaepernick is not at his best in a classic offense, but he’s still better at that than many of the guys who have actually been hired as backups. Put him into a system designed around whoever the starter is, and he will be adequate. I don’t recall Harbaugh’s being concerned that Kaepernick couldn’t back up Alex Smith. On the contrary, when Kaepernick got his first start after Smith went down with concussion, Harbaugh didn’t treat him gently with a lot of running plays, he had him throwing downfield from the get-go. And when Kaep became established as the starter, there was no problem with Smith backing him up. When Smith was traded, the team acquired other backups who didn’t have Kaep’s particular skill set.

What Kaepernick needs to succeed are a couple of very good receivers. When both Crabtree and Davis were healthy, he was great with the 49ers. When one of them was out, he struggled. He isn’t good at progressions, that’s been well documented, and then he panics and starts running. But when he has a couple of good receivers who he can count on, he’s reasonably comfortable in the pocket and thrives.

The bottom line is we all know that if Kaepernick hadn’t protested by sitting at the pledge before games, he would have offers as a backup, and no one would be talking about his deficiencies as a pocket passer. All backup QBs have deficiencies, that’s why they’re backups. You can make the comparison to RGIII, but he never played well after his rookie season, and constantly got injured from running. And in fact, RGIII did get a job at Cleveland, at a time when his track record and future prognosis were quite a bit worse than what Kaepernick’s are now.
My thinking is that he would be a better fit in a team that took advantage of his mobility through their O scheme. Every QB will do better in an offense that is built around their skill set.
Yeah but many teams with some form of West Coast O-scheme already have their QB-1 or hopeful heir-apparent (Colts' Luck, Eagles' Wentz, Chiefs' Smith/ Mahomes, Giants' Eli M, 9ers' want Cousins or 2018 draftee, Raiders' Carr, Skins' Captain Kirk, Falcons' Matty Ice, Raves' Flacco, Bills' Tyrod Taylor, Jags' Bortles, Fins' Tannehill, Browns' Osweiller/ Kizer, Bears' Glennon/ Trubisky, Broncs' Siemian/ Lynch, and Texans' Deshaun Watson). There are only a few teams with that kind of scheme that need a QB starter. Jets maybe but fans have flooded the team with letters saying they don't want Kap there. The Bills or Houston possibly, or Miami to give Tannehill a run. But in Buffalo or Miami he would have to come into both of those places initially as a backup. In fact, at this point I think any place he goes he will have to come in as a backup. He just needs a place where he can legitimately compete for the QB-1 job. I get the feeling time is running out for him to get that kind of opportunity, but maybe not. I also think because of accuracy issues on deep routes the best scheme for him is a West Coast style using short to intermediate routes involving the TE but not one that's a vertical passing scheme like Atlanta. Frankly he does not have a lot of choices. A strong running attack would help him. That's partly why people thought Seattle would be a good fit once they get their o-line issues worked out, or Dallas could be a good fit as a backup (replacing Kellen Moore).
 
I feel the same way. I'd likely vote no.

Along with DeShone Kizer, I think Patrick Mahomes has the most long-term NFL potential taken this draft. No QB in this draft is going to be ready to start week one (though a few may be asked to). No QB this draft is as ready as Jared Goff was last year (and we saw how ready he was). So you have to look, think and plan long term. There is no way either Mahomes or Kizer are going to be asked to do anything this season. Maybe not next season either. Both are going to sit, watch, and learn.

A perfect situation with both. Especially Mahomens, playing behind a very respectable starting QB in Smith, with a highly experienced coach in Reid, for a very stable team/management/system in KC. Kizer has all the tools, but the Browns, even with their new longer term rebuilding thinking, are still a question mark.

I was a little surprised Brad Kaaya dropped to the 6th round and Detroit, but he does have real potential.

As to Kaeprnick, I think I've said all I can about him at this point.

Massive contract for Derek Carr. But bigger ones for more players are to follow.
 
That was a good write-up, but I have to say it also focused too much on, or didn't seem to acknowledge in some teams, that the players make it happen as much as the coaching staff. A good example would be that some coaches succeed with some teams, and fail with others. Still, it's interesting to see what some teams employ, and to what success.

As to Jeff Fisher, one would think he'd be looking at retirement, but with the way the coaching carousel goes in the NFL, he could be back. I mean, there are plenty of 4-12 teams who would love to have a 7-9 year or two. :)
 
Re:

Alpe d'Huez said:
That was a good write-up, but I have to say it also focused too much on, or didn't seem to acknowledge in some teams, that the players make it happen as much as the coaching staff. A good example would be that some coaches succeed with some teams, and fail with others. Still, it's interesting to see what some teams employ, and to what success.

As to Jeff Fisher, one would think he'd be looking at retirement, but with the way the coaching carousel goes in the NFL, he could be back. I mean, there are plenty of 4-12 teams who would love to have a 7-9 year or two. :)
I agree with what you say about the article. Sometimes I think these writers are under a timeline and as result don't do the complete job on a story that they'd like to do. Example, read "Every Teams Riskiest Offseason Moves" by Gagnon of Bleacher Report. EVERY TEAM - that is a tough one to accurately nail and be current on each team's personnel situation.

Regarding Fisher, he says he wants to return to the sideline. Some think he will. I think he will but not as a HC, at least not at first. He needs someone over him to control discipline.

-----
New stuff -
Saw Richie Incognito on Fox's 'The Herd with Colin Cowherd'. There was no discussion about Richie's career etc (you know, no discussion for his 1-year bullying ban). But they discussed how the new CBA is ruining offensive line play. Some of the things Richie said I had noticed. Here is a brief synopsis (sorry could not find the video - the show is on their website, but not the segment with Richie):

- OLine play is highly technical in so many aspects including pad position, hand position, that it takes much time to master various aspects. No surprise so far.

- The CBA has limited the amount of time players can spend in the weight room, training facilities, in pads practicing to the extent it making it harder for new players coming out of college to get up to speed.

- Back in the day (Richie's coming out of college), Richie said the college career was a grind (he was a Husker). He said the general progression of a college lineman in his day was to Red Shirt as a freshman, play special teams as a RSF and sophomore, be a backup player by junior season, then hopeful starter by senior season. But today, OLine players are not redshirting, they are playing sooner, are sometimes leaving following their college junior year, and as result are younger (mentally and physically), meaning less mature, less physically developed, are now entering the NFL well behind the learning curve, then asked to play catch up under a CBA system that limits development. Some of this we may have noticed.

- ALL of that Richie says is ruining offensive line play in the NFL.

I would think that is exacerbated as seasoned veterans retire. No wonder Tom Cable has tried to convert defensive linemen to play offensive line. IMO, I think if I needed an OLineman, I'd rather draft one who actually played the position in college and therefore has SOME knowledge and skills developed. Other than that, Incognito was a very intelligent and articulate person.
 
Rule #1: never give the opponent more motivation by making stupid statements.

So, what does KC cornerback Marcus Peters do? He says:
Chiefs Will Beat 'Dog S--T' out of Marshawn Lynch, & the Raiders.
http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2720893-marcus-peters-says-chiefs-will-beat-dog-s-t-out-of-marshawn-lynch-raiders
And its not even training camp yet. Too bad for KC Oakland won't forget the comment.

How do I think Lynch will do in Oakland? In his 4-5 years in Seattle, Lynch recorded 2 Beast Quake runs (vs. Saints & Cards). With this Raider OL, he could get that many explosive runs every couple of games. Most RBs production tails off after age 29. Lynch is 31, but he is not like most RBs. I think his production will be aided, not just by the Raider personnel, but the blocking schemes they use. Seattle ran mostly inside zone (vertical displacement of defenders) and some outside zone (lateral displacement of defenders getting the RB to the edge). Oakland does those, plus Counter Trey and Duo (2 double teams). As a result of personnel and scheme, I think he will have more opportunity to rack up explosive plays in Oakland than he did in Seattle. Murray had those chances, but was too easily brought down. Well, enough talk. Watch the video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SZ16E8Ub-6Q&feature=player_embedded
I pity KC.
 
I can also easily see Lynch getting plenty of rest in games, and throughout the season. Enough playing to stay in football shape, but not asked to do so much he gets banged up. That's the goal.

Imagine it's the 4th quarter of a game late in the season and he's healthy. Everyone on your D is tired, and he's put in the game having only played a few downs so far...
 
Completely agree with those great points there Alpe. He won't get as many touches as he did in Seattle, will be more rested at the end of games, and having Lynch (completely healthy or not) in the 4th quarter is like having a nuke in your arsenal. He played with some nagging ab and back pain in Seattle, so has proven he can play with pain and deliver.

Now the only unknown about platooning Lynch is to see how that affects his running. Lynch, like many RBs, is a back who gets into a rhythm with more touches. So it will be interesting to see if fewer touches reduces his production. But fewer touches may result in him running more angry, as if he needs more of that, right.

As to angst, he is already one of the angriest runners in the history of the sport. And his running style is infectious to offensive linemen, motivating them to play more angry. When he dragged a pile of tacklers in Seattle you'd often see his linemen plow into the pile pushing him even further. So it will be interesting to see how his blockers respond.
 
Re:

The Hitch said:
Haven't decided if I will watch NFL this season.

I loved it so much but that Pats Superbowl win is going to be so hard to get over.
I understand that. Many times I have had that awful feeling. Although I never got to the point where I said no more, probably because it's too much in my blood.

But I would encourage you to keep watching. A couple of things help me ease the sting of a loss. First is to find something positive about the winner. Anything. And usually it comes down to being happy for if only just one player on the winning team, or a fan of the winning team. Secondly (and this is the hardest because it is contrary to society), is to realize that it is more about the journey than the prize. The journey is who you go through it with, the experiences you have together, and the bonds you make with people. But society says the Winner's prize is all that matters. Even to the point of "win at all cost".

Relating the journey versus the prize to sports cars, the journey is the blue car model. You know not real flashy. The prize model is the red car model. But that is a whole separate topic that actually differentiates some college football programs from others. And differentiates the principles taught in developing young men. This is largely why I think football is so valuable.

But some say you can't be successful using the blue car model yet John Wooden was a blue car coach who was very successful. And then success depends on how its measured isn't it. The prize or the journey. There are a number of books on this topic if you want to find out more. One is "Make the Big Time Where You Are" by Frosty Westering, who got a lot of his ideas from coach Wooden.

Cheers bud.
 

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