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State of the Peloton 2024

Page 12 - Get up to date with the latest news, scores & standings from the Cycling News Community.
Yeah, completely absurd...except every other **king.year. one of us is making a ridiculous post, for god*damn sure.

yeah like, I understand its dumb to compare the speeds of grand tours because the routes are all so different, but Roubaix has had the same exact...last 100k? for forever. you can compare. especially when it's 8km/hr difference in 14 years. that's not negligible. that's absurd.
 
Blood doping is extremely potent. The only reason to not blood bags and EPO would be for a new product that worked as a substitute.
Yep, even smaller amounts of blood transfusions have a large impact for an endurance athlete:

 
Cancellara's fastest ever Roubaix is 5:45:33...20 minutes behind Mathieu...that places him 107th, and finishing ahead of only 4 people who finished inside the time limit, today. What.In.The.Actual.F**k.
There’s a lot of variables at play. But I think there’s enough of a trend it’s clear something has changed significantly in the last few years. Track and field records seem to be getting smashed more frequently now as well, but maybe not to this degree.
 
Cancellara's fastest ever Roubaix is 5:45:33...20 minutes behind Mathieu...that places him 107th, and finishing ahead of only 4 people who finished inside the time limit, today. What.In.The.Actual.F**k.
In prior generations, Once a lead group forged a gap they tended to take it easy for stretches between cobbled sectors (thus slower overall). When Cancellara launched his 50 km in P-R, Boonen was eating a sandwich.
A more useful comparison would be the time each rider (of a comparison group) took to cover one or more of the toughest sectors. This would be more like comparing climbing times, but as with ascents there are still variables like wind, weather, drafting to take into account.
 
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In prior generations, Once a lead group forged a gap they tended to take it easy for stretches between cobbled sectors (thus slower overall). When Cancellara launched his 50 km in P-R, Boonen was eating a sandwich.
A more useful comparison would be the time each rider (of a comparison group) took to cover one or more of the toughest sectors. This would be more like comparing climbing times, but as with ascents there are still variables like wind, weather, drafting to take into account.
I understand all of this, but I do not believe that the raw data can be so easily dismissed, particularly because I'm not comparing Canc or Boonen to Mathieu...I'm comparing them to Joey Rosskopf who finished 107th...and in a similar time. I'm going to guess that Rosskopf didn't ride full gas once getting dropped like a rock, earlier in the race.
 
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I will caveat to this extent (I wrote this in another thread), but I do think tire size and pressure plays a significant role. Tubeless tires running at the right pressure give you grip and comfort that is light years ahead of the size and pressures that Canc and Boonen were running. Someone mentioned Mathieu cornering, thus carrying momentum, and that is so much easier on the right tires, and pressures. No doubt about that...but still, Joey Rosskopf (no disrespect to Mr. Rosskopf in any way).
 
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I understand all of this, but I do not believe that the raw data can be so easily dismissed, particularly because I'm not comparing Canc or Boonen to Mathieu...I'm comparing them to Joey Rosskopf who finished 107th...and in a similar time. I'm going to guess that Rosskopf didn't ride full gas once getting dropped like a rock, earlier in the race.
actually everybody dropped was riding full gas untill the finish to keep up appearances that it was indeed tailwind from helicopter, better waifu pillows and tires pumped with fairy farts that make every race a record breaking event

its funny when EPO got introduced into peloton, people noticed that cycling became suddenly faster and we see the same thing happening now, current generation isnt just a bit faster, they Bob Beamon over elite cyclists from just 10 years ago who were already plenty suspiscious on their own, doesnt matter whether its a classic,TT or a mountain stage

tinfoil hat on

only thing that advanced since pandemic is covering the doping practices and even then cycling just caught up to professional football,basketball,athletics etc. because they figured out its much more lucrative to keep everything under wrap

tinfoil hat off

i probably dont even need that tinfoil hat anyway
 
I understand all of this, but I do not believe that the raw data can be so easily dismissed, particularly because I'm not comparing Canc or Boonen to Mathieu...I'm comparing them to Joey Rosskopf who finished 107th...and in a similar time. I'm going to guess that Rosskopf didn't ride full gas once getting dropped like a rock, earlier in the race.
Sorry if I wasn’t clear, I’m not trying to dismiss the significance of ever increasing speeds in various races. I was just trying suggest why there might be SUCH a big different in elapsed time in P-R from the Boonen/ Cancellara days. And I could be wrong about it anyways :)