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The official Egan Bernal is the new Egan Bernal thread

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Re:

Red Rick said:
It's not just he's 22. He's Colombian who are generally notorious early bloomers. Quintana didn't get any better after he was 23, and Bernal's rise was faster than that.
Yeah, but early bloomer is not early peaker. Colombians are characterized as early bloomers in Europe because only those who do well early end up racing in Europe, and local journeymen-come-contenders rarely make the jump up later in life as it is a far harder transition to make later in life for myriad reasons.

But the most illustrious Colombian cyclists hit their peaks reasonably late. Cochise Rodriguez broke the hour record at 28 and had his best European results at the '74 Giro when he was 32. Lucho Herrera was 26 when he won the Vuelta and 30 when he snagged his last polka dot jersey. Whereupon he seemed to get hit by the same quick generational turnover that brought out other stars of the era, including Fignon and LeMond. Speaking of which, Santiago Botero was on the cusp of his 30th birthday when he had his annus mirabilis, winning the world time trial title and standing on the figurative fourth step on the champs elysees. Rigoberto Uran's literal podium showing, the brightest 2nd place of his ilustrious string, took place well after his 31st birthday last year. And say what you will about Quintana, but he hasn't yet seen spring come for the thirtieth time himself, so any judgment on his career seems less than definitive. Meanwhile, for Edouard Louis Joseph of Meensel-Kiezegem, his 30th spring was his last competitive one, having won his 11th and final grand tour shortly after his 29th birthday.

Geraint Thomas will be the unquestionable leader for Ineos going into this summer, having thoroughly won his place after nearly a decade of service, where he stood out for his loyalty, deference and bonhomie as much as for his results. The defending British champion on a British team with a British sponsor, anything less would be flatly out of the question at this junction. Extending him as many olive branches as possible is by far the wisest course of action for young Egan, who has been given nearly every opportunity at Ineos, and made the most of most of them so far. But Sky made a name for itself via their relentless focus on first place, and everyone working there, Geraint Thomas foremost amongst them, is well acquainted with the cutthroat nature of the team and the sport. Brailsford certainly knows that a 32-year old with one GT top 10 on his palmares is hardly a guarantee of victory, and the Tour is the only race that matters to him. So Bernal will likely once again find himself given the opportunity to exceed expectations, or, by now, if the professionals are anything to go by, to meet them odds-on. I expect him to continue to avoid reiterating that unpleasant fact to the one man who could most easily find himself in a position to help or hinder his attempt to prove it.
 
Re: Re:

carton said:
Red Rick said:
It's not just he's 22. He's Colombian who are generally notorious early bloomers. Quintana didn't get any better after he was 23, and Bernal's rise was faster than that.
Yeah, but early bloomer is not early peaker. Colombians are characterized as early bloomers in Europe because only those who do well early end up racing in Europe, and local journeymen-come-contenders rarely make the jump up later in life as it is a far harder transition to make later in life for myriad reasons.

But the most illustrious Colombian cyclists hit their peaks reasonably late. Cochise Rodriguez broke the hour record at 28 and had his best European results at the '74 Giro when he was 32. Lucho Herrera was 26 when he won the Vuelta and 30 when he snagged his last polka dot jersey. Whereupon he seemed to get hit by the same quick generational turnover that brought out other stars of the era, including Fignon and LeMond. Speaking of which, Santiago Botero was on the cusp of his 30th birthday when he had his annus mirabilis, winning the world time trial title and standing on the figurative fourth step on the champs elysees. Rigoberto Uran's literal podium showing, the brightest 2nd place of his ilustrious string, took place well after his 31st birthday last year. And say what you will about Quintana, but he hasn't yet seen spring come for the thirtieth time himself, so any judgment on his career seems less than definitive. Meanwhile, for Edouard Louis Joseph of Meensel-Kiezegem, his 30th spring was his last competitive one, having won his 11th and final grand tour shortly after his 29th birthday.

Geraint Thomas will be the unquestionable leader for Ineos going into this summer, having thoroughly won his place after nearly a decade of service, where he stood out for his loyalty, deference and bonhomie as much as for his results. The defending British champion on a British team with a British sponsor, anything less would be flatly out of the question at this junction. Extending him as many olive branches as possible is by far the wisest course of action for young Egan, who has been given nearly every opportunity at Ineos, and made the most of most of them so far. But Sky made a name for itself via their relentless focus on first place, and everyone working there, Geraint Thomas foremost amongst them, is well acquainted with the cutthroat nature of the team and the sport. Brailsford certainly knows that a 32-year old with one GT top 10 on his palmares is hardly a guarantee of victory, and the Tour is the only race that matters to him. So Bernal will likely once again find himself given the opportunity to exceed expectations, or, by now, if the professionals are anything to go by, to meet them odds-on. I expect him to continue to avoid reiterating that unpleasant fact to the one man who could most easily find himself in a position to help or hinder his attempt to prove it.
Froome's gonna be back next year.

Froome and Thomas will still be British next year. And the year thereafter. And the year after that one.

If Bernal sits pretty and Thomas wins, Thomas will be the double defending champion next year, and Bernal will only have a podium or other random top 10 to claim leadership.

I've seen plenty comparisons to Contador. I have a rough idea about what he'd do.

I mean what are they gonna do? Not send him to the Tour next year? That's the best he can hope for if he can't be a protected rider anyway

Lastly, last year they sent him to the Tour to be a dom instead of letting him have a crack at the Vuelta. This year, same thing again. Even before Froome crashed out. Yeah Bernal is really gonna get his own chance by waiting for it.
 
Re: Re:

Valv.Piti said:
spalco said:
I don't like this comment:
I'm just 22 years old so I think that I have a lot of Tours in front of me."
It's not wrong per se of course, but Quintana or Andy Schleck probably thought that too at some point. If you got the chance to win the Tour you must grab it with both hands.

I hope he's cutthroat enough to fulfill his potential.
Yep, you MUST take any opportunity to win. Strike when the iron is hot. You never know with crashes, sickness, new prodigies, clinic stuff etc etc. There are way too many variables in cycling and especially when it comes to a race like TdF, stuff happens.
You never know with life, simple. As you said, you must take any opportunity to win, which applies to not just cycling but everywhere.
 
Re: Re:

Red Rick said:
carton said:
Red Rick said:
It's not just he's 22. He's Colombian who are generally notorious early bloomers. Quintana didn't get any better after he was 23, and Bernal's rise was faster than that.
Yeah, but early bloomer is not early peaker. Colombians are characterized as early bloomers in Europe because only those who do well early end up racing in Europe, and local journeymen-come-contenders rarely make the jump up later in life as it is a far harder transition to make later in life for myriad reasons.

But the most illustrious Colombian cyclists hit their peaks reasonably late. Cochise Rodriguez broke the hour record at 28 and had his best European results at the '74 Giro when he was 32. Lucho Herrera was 26 when he won the Vuelta and 30 when he snagged his last polka dot jersey. Whereupon he seemed to get hit by the same quick generational turnover that brought out other stars of the era, including Fignon and LeMond. Speaking of which, Santiago Botero was on the cusp of his 30th birthday when he had his annus mirabilis, winning the world time trial title and standing on the figurative fourth step on the champs elysees. Rigoberto Uran's literal podium showing, the brightest 2nd place of his ilustrious string, took place well after his 31st birthday last year. And say what you will about Quintana, but he hasn't yet seen spring come for the thirtieth time himself, so any judgment on his career seems less than definitive. Meanwhile, for Edouard Louis Joseph of Meensel-Kiezegem, his 30th spring was his last competitive one, having won his 11th and final grand tour shortly after his 29th birthday.

Geraint Thomas will be the unquestionable leader for Ineos going into this summer, having thoroughly won his place after nearly a decade of service, where he stood out for his loyalty, deference and bonhomie as much as for his results. The defending British champion on a British team with a British sponsor, anything less would be flatly out of the question at this junction. Extending him as many olive branches as possible is by far the wisest course of action for young Egan, who has been given nearly every opportunity at Ineos, and made the most of most of them so far. But Sky made a name for itself via their relentless focus on first place, and everyone working there, Geraint Thomas foremost amongst them, is well acquainted with the cutthroat nature of the team and the sport. Brailsford certainly knows that a 32-year old with one GT top 10 on his palmares is hardly a guarantee of victory, and the Tour is the only race that matters to him. So Bernal will likely once again find himself given the opportunity to exceed expectations, or, by now, if the professionals are anything to go by, to meet them odds-on. I expect him to continue to avoid reiterating that unpleasant fact to the one man who could most easily find himself in a position to help or hinder his attempt to prove it.
Froome's gonna be back next year.

Froome and Thomas will still be British next year. And the year thereafter. And the year after that one.

If Bernal sits pretty and Thomas wins, Thomas will be the double defending champion next year, and Bernal will only have a podium or other random top 10 to claim leadership.

I've seen plenty comparisons to Contador. I have a rough idea about what he'd do.

I mean what are they gonna do? Not send him to the Tour next year? That's the best he can hope for if he can't be a protected rider anyway

Lastly, last year they sent him to the Tour to be a dom instead of letting him have a crack at the Vuelta. This year, same thing again. Even before Froome crashed out. Yeah Bernal is really gonna get his own chance by waiting for it.
I think he was just being political.
 
Aug 6, 2015
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3,045
Guys. Looking at this years TdF strength of field I think Ineos can succesfully ride whole race with two protected riders. I really don't think Bernal will be forced to work or sacrifice himself for Thomas. And he if he'll end up being stronger than G. he will likely win GC.
 
Re: Re:

Red Rick said:
carton said:
Red Rick said:
It's not just he's 22. He's Colombian who are generally notorious early bloomers. Quintana didn't get any better after he was 23, and Bernal's rise was faster than that.
Yeah, but early bloomer is not early peaker. Colombians are characterized as early bloomers in Europe because only those who do well early end up racing in Europe, and local journeymen-come-contenders rarely make the jump up later in life as it is a far harder transition to make later in life for myriad reasons.

But the most illustrious Colombian cyclists hit their peaks reasonably late. Cochise Rodriguez broke the hour record at 28 and had his best European results at the '74 Giro when he was 32. Lucho Herrera was 26 when he won the Vuelta and 30 when he snagged his last polka dot jersey. Whereupon he seemed to get hit by the same quick generational turnover that brought out other stars of the era, including Fignon and LeMond. Speaking of which, Santiago Botero was on the cusp of his 30th birthday when he had his annus mirabilis, winning the world time trial title and standing on the figurative fourth step on the champs elysees. Rigoberto Uran's literal podium showing, the brightest 2nd place of his ilustrious string, took place well after his 31st birthday last year. And say what you will about Quintana, but he hasn't yet seen spring come for the thirtieth time himself, so any judgment on his career seems less than definitive. Meanwhile, for Edouard Louis Joseph of Meensel-Kiezegem, his 30th spring was his last competitive one, having won his 11th and final grand tour shortly after his 29th birthday.

Geraint Thomas will be the unquestionable leader for Ineos going into this summer, having thoroughly won his place after nearly a decade of service, where he stood out for his loyalty, deference and bonhomie as much as for his results. The defending British champion on a British team with a British sponsor, anything less would be flatly out of the question at this junction. Extending him as many olive branches as possible is by far the wisest course of action for young Egan, who has been given nearly every opportunity at Ineos, and made the most of most of them so far. But Sky made a name for itself via their relentless focus on first place, and everyone working there, Geraint Thomas foremost amongst them, is well acquainted with the cutthroat nature of the team and the sport. Brailsford certainly knows that a 32-year old with one GT top 10 on his palmares is hardly a guarantee of victory, and the Tour is the only race that matters to him. So Bernal will likely once again find himself given the opportunity to exceed expectations, or, by now, if the professionals are anything to go by, to meet them odds-on. I expect him to continue to avoid reiterating that unpleasant fact to the one man who could most easily find himself in a position to help or hinder his attempt to prove it.
Froome's gonna be back next year.

Froome and Thomas will still be British next year. And the year thereafter. And the year after that one.

If Bernal sits pretty and Thomas wins, Thomas will be the double defending champion next year, and Bernal will only have a podium or other random top 10 to claim leadership.

I've seen plenty comparisons to Contador. I have a rough idea about what he'd do.

I mean what are they gonna do? Not send him to the Tour next year? That's the best he can hope for if he can't be a protected rider anyway

Lastly, last year they sent him to the Tour to be a dom instead of letting him have a crack at the Vuelta. This year, same thing again. Even before Froome crashed out. Yeah Bernal is really gonna get his own chance by waiting for it.
There is probably less than a fifty fifty chance of Froome being competive in next years TDF
 
Escarabajo said:
Red Rick said:
Froome's gonna be back next year. Froome and Thomas will still be British next year. And the year thereafter. And the year after that one. If Bernal sits pretty and Thomas wins, Thomas will be the double defending champion next year, and Bernal will only have a podium or other random top 10 to claim leadership. I've seen plenty comparisons to Contador. I have a rough idea about what he'd do. I mean what are they gonna do? Not send him to the Tour next year? That's the best he can hope for if he can't be a protected rider anyway Lastly, last year they sent him to the Tour to be a dom instead of letting him have a crack at the Vuelta. This year, same thing again. Even before Froome crashed out. Yeah Bernal is really gonna get his own chance by waiting for it.
I think he was just being political.
Arked said:
Guys. Looking at this years TdF strength of field I think Ineos can succesfully ride whole race with two protected riders. I really don't think Bernal will be forced to work or sacrifice himself for Thomas. And he if he'll end up being stronger than G. he will likely win GC.
Yeah, that was the gist of my argument on that point. I think Red Rick is underrating the role Bernal be given anyway. I seriously doubt that they"ll make him work, at least until the Tourmalet. If he shows he's better than Thomas then nothing need be said. Even more so if he is as good as he might really be, and properly lights it up. On the flip side, they won't force Thomas to work for him unless he falls far of the pace anyway. And if Thomas proves to be stronger then that's pretty much that as well. Why not show respect to someone who has thoroughly earned it? Particularly within your team, with someone you seem to get along with? I don't get it.

del1962 said:
Red Rick said:
Froome's gonna be back next year.

Froome and Thomas will still be British next year. And the year thereafter. And the year after that one.

If Bernal sits pretty and Thomas wins, Thomas will be the double defending champion next year, and Bernal will only have a podium or other random top 10 to claim leadership.

I've seen plenty comparisons to Contador. I have a rough idea about what he'd do.

I mean what are they gonna do? Not send him to the Tour next year? That's the best he can hope for if he can't be a protected rider anyway

Lastly, last year they sent him to the Tour to be a dom instead of letting him have a crack at the Vuelta. This year, same thing again. Even before Froome crashed out. Yeah Bernal is really gonna get his own chance by waiting for it.
There is probably less than a fifty-fifty chance of Froome being competitive in next years TDF
This, exactly. If Thomas and Bernal are neck and neck at the head of affairs, staring at into the mist on the Tourmalet as Poels finally yields, their rivals scattered across the mountain below...then wake up Sir Dave, and have a flat white. The reality is that Bernal was already handed lone leadership coming into this Giro. Froome will be 35 coming into next year and recovering from a massive injury. Thomas will be 34, with possibly only that brilliant Tour win on his GT palmares to show for it. If Egan does win the Tour this year, then what? Who has a chance to be the main man in the best grand tour racing team on earth -again, assuming he is all that he might be- if he just keeps his head down and lets his legs do the talking?
 
Jungle Cycle said:
Robert5091 said:
So will Bernal be used to chase down GC attacks uphill or will it be stick together and grind out a high pace?
Hope he'll chase attacks and then counter... as soon as #6... why not?
I would not be surprised if G has occasional problems in the mountains so Ineos have to decide what to do, but this year they might be lucky as the GC contenders all seem to be either coming from the Giro, or have poor form. That Fuglsang is talked about as a podium contender says a lot.
 
Re: Re:

jaylew said:
I disagree with this. Geraint has already shown decent form this year in Romandie and in Suisse before going out and I don't see any reason why that would be an absolute prerequisite for winning the Tour anyway. Other guys have done it without looking great beforehand. Just off the top of my head, I'm sure Sastre didn't do much before he won.
Sastre had relatively low number of victories but he had five top-10s in Tour as well as in Vuelta including few podiums.
 
Re: Re:

Finn84 said:
jaylew said:
I disagree with this. Geraint has already shown decent form this year in Romandie and in Suisse before going out and I don't see any reason why that would be an absolute prerequisite for winning the Tour anyway. Other guys have done it without looking great beforehand. Just off the top of my head, I'm sure Sastre didn't do much before he won.
Sastre had relatively low number of victories but he had five top-10s in Tour as well as in Vuelta including few podiums.
did not do much in 2008 before the Tour
 
Re: Re:

roundabout said:
Finn84 said:
jaylew said:
I disagree with this. Geraint has already shown decent form this year in Romandie and in Suisse before going out and I don't see any reason why that would be an absolute prerequisite for winning the Tour anyway. Other guys have done it without looking great beforehand. Just off the top of my head, I'm sure Sastre didn't do much before he won.
Sastre had relatively low number of victories but he had five top-10s in Tour as well as in Vuelta including few podiums.
did not do much in 2008 before the Tour
Bingo.

Arredondo said:
Great rider. Will be good for him to learn under the guidance of Torres.

He should fight for the podium in a GT in 5 years.
Will he beat Arredondo's prediction by two years? This was the first response in this thread.
 
Re:

TourOfSardinia said:
Ominous
the Italian press (Gazzetta) claiming "Bernal made in Italy: :D
https://www.gazzetta.it/ciclismo/tour-de-france/04-07-2019/bernal-made-italy-sicilia-piemonte-va-caccia-tour-340587373373.shtml
In the print version there are two cute photos of him on the beach in Sicily
and with IIRC an Italian horse
not a donkey
;)
Translated with DeepL

Bernal made in Italy: from Sicily and Piedmont on the hunt for the Tour

The Colombian climber lived in Italy for two years: his first swim in the sea was in Catania. "If Thomas is stronger than me, I'll have no problem helping him. I arrive in France with confidence".

Talent-

Vladimir, Massimo and Paolino are three of Egan Bernal's Piedmontese friends. In mid-June they went to visit him at the Giro di Svizzera: they greeted him and brought him meliga pasta (in Piedmontese dialect means cornmeal), which he is fond of. This is just one of the many little secrets of the Egan Bernal "made in Italy" that from Saturday in Brussels will go hunting for the yellow jersey of the Tour and that today, with the other 175 colleagues, will parade for the presentation (17.30-19.15) in the Grand Place, the heart of the capital.

Etna and tarts-

The yellow jersey? Isn't it too early? But no. The time categories of the champions are not the same as those of the common mortals and it's not so strange that the Colombian of Team Ineos is also considered by the bookmakers as the main favourite of a Tour without Froome and Dumoulin, despite being only 22 years old and just a great lap behind him, just last year's Tour. The predestined make a mockery of the deadlines, if anything they are capable of anticipating the future. Bernal, the superfine climber, has already won important races (California 2018, Paris-Nice and Tour de Suisse 2019), overcoming - even - falls and accidents, the last of which excluded him at the last moment from the Giro (broken collarbone). And there will be many fans stationed in the Boot - including islands - who will cheer for him. Bernal's Italy is not just a slogan. You can't just guess from the excellent Italian he speaks. It's something more.

Determination-

The sharp bends of Etna and the beach of Catania, where he bathed in the sea for the first time. That's how his Italy started. Bernal - originally from Zipaquirà, 2,650 meters above sea level in the department of Cundinamarca - arrived after the World Junior Mountain Bike Championship in Andorra (2015) with the bronze medal around his neck on a flight from Barcelona to Catania and slept at the home of Paolo Alberati, who initially acted as his attorney. "He loved the tarts my wife Valeria makes. Egan is a wonderful guy. I was lucky to meet a guy with his immense talent, but I didn't make him strong. He was born there, and it could mark an era in cycling. As for the first steps in the world of the great (2016-2017), it is known that Bernal was weaned by Gianni Savio's Androni-Sidermec. Piedmontese Savio, Piedmontese - from Pertusio - Giovanni Ellena, the good sports director who followed him most closely. Egan, who was born on January 13 as Marco Pantani, was based for a long time at the hotel-restaurant Buasca, in a hamlet of San Colombano Belmonte, before moving to an apartment in Cuorgné. The ascent of Ceresole Reale-Lago Serrù was one of his favourites. Vladimir Chiuminatto founded a fan club that now has more than 250 meters and has crossed the borders of Canavese: at the end of each year, the members send - executing the will of their darling - an economic aid to the "Fundaciòn Mezuena", where the first mentor Pablo Mazuera weaned the boys who want to engage in sport. "Once Egan came to my house with his girlfriend Xiomara - says Chiuminatto - and prepared us a Colombian dinner. Also at the end of 2018 Bernal returned to Cuorgné, to the Margherita cinema, for an evening with those who adore him.

Now Bernal resides in Andorra but the contact with Piedmont keeps him also thanks to his manager, Giuseppe Acquadro from Biella: "Not only the strictly cycling skills. He also has an extraordinary intelligence. He has always shown himself determined to get to the top. But he knew well that it would not come all and immediately, he should and must make many sacrifices. Since he is aware of this, he is able to apply himself with dedication and commitment". Thomas, reigning champion, will be at his side at the Tour. Bernal is ready: the road will define the hierarchies. And a nice piece of Italy has no doubt as to who to support.
 
Re:

AlexNYC said:
Well, we know now he’s not messing around (or maybe this has been Ineos’s plan all along)
To me, reading between the lines of what Ineos have been saying in the last few weeks its been clear that they have limited belief or confidence in Thomas this year.....but i guess politically and from a PR point of view its difficult to come out and say that and at least on the face of it not support the defending champion, he deserves that much at least....but i think Bernal is the real leader, and yes a couple more results like this in the early stages should make things much less complicated.
 
I wouldn't read into it that much yet. Thomas lost 5 seconds on Bernal, but in reality, it was just a 1 second gap between the two of them. Could have been Thomas got held up by someone, got boxed in, and had to bridge a small gap... Could be a moment of weakness, or the finish not suiting him as much... It's a three week race, one second doesn't mean much, especially considering Thomas might improve more (than Bernal) further down the road, since he didn't have the full TDS as prep.
 
Lovely old-school tactical move today by Ineos to give Egan five seconds over most of his GC rivals...and it appears nobody has figured it out yet because there is no widespread internet outrage. A marginal gain to be sure, but a gain nonetheless. :)
 
oldcrank said:
Lovely old-school tactical move today by Ineos to give Egan five seconds over most of his GC rivals...and it appears nobody has figured it out yet because there is no widespread internet outrage. A marginal gain to be sure, but a gain nonetheless. :)

Pinot was in that group as well. I think one or two others as well. Not marginal gains, normal for a stage finish like this.
 
Ha ha. Like I said nobody has figured it out. He certainly wasn't the first, but I remember someone who looked much like Shane Sutton successfully doing it for a team mate in a domestic week-end "stage race" many years ago. Ah, the good old days. What's old is new again. :surprised:
 
oldcrank said:
Ha ha. Like I said nobody has figured it out. He certainly wasn't the first, but I remember someone who looked much like Shane Sutton successfully doing it for a team mate in a domestic week-end "stage race" many years ago. Ah, the good old days. What's old is new again. :surprised:

On the other hand, I'd also go with Valverde not being in that group that gained the handful of seconds as more proof that he's really not racing for GC. It was a smart move on the part of those who did get on the right side of the time cut.
 

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