the Viking, Magnus "De" Cort thread

Squire said:
So, the stage winner has a 'De' in his name...
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So, I figured winning two GT stages would qualify you for a hype thread. :D
Anyway, this guy seems to be going places.

He had his breakthrough in the 2013 Tour of Denmark and was quickly offered a contract by Garmin. However, he chose to stay on the continental circuit for another year, before signing with Orica. At this year's ToD he, like last year, rode for the National team, having been sent there - at least in part - by Orica in order to 'get back to his winning ways', a plan I gotta say worked out pretty well.
 
I thought he could do more for my fantasy team at the beginning of the year. Can't complain about the two GT stage wins, but I expected a little more versatily.

How are you expecting him to develop?
 
Feb 20, 2016
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Good talent - should be a great classics rider ala Degenkolb/Kristoff maybe. Certainly not a pure sprinter (I hope).

Don't know how he handles distance though, but winning 2 stages of the final 4 in a very hard Vuelta sure is promising.
 
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Thepirateisgood said:
Good talent - should be a great classics rider ala Degenkolb/Kristoff maybe. Certainly not a pure sprinter (I hope).

Don't know how he handles distance though, but winning 2 stages of the final 4 in a very hard Vuelta sure is promising.
Tenth in Plouay last year, no worries :)


First heard of him after he won MTF finish in junior Peace Race. Clearly a big talent, especially for cobbles. Not every rider can right away be there with the best on cobbles like Moscon or Benoot but I think Cort will join the club in a year or two. With no Matthews in team he should've more chances to sprint in the biggest races next year. If we compare his ToD pefromances in 2015 and 2016 it's easy to notice that he improved both on hills and time trial. Two stage wins in Vuelta proves his talent. One could be a lucky shot but not two.
 
Oct 10, 2015
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Re: Magnus "Maggie" Cort

Think he's a rider with a heap of upside, his 2 stage wins were impressive but it's the work he did on the other days that showed what a good quality rider he is. Think he will shape up as a good classics type rider and GT Dom/stage hunter. He certainly made the right choice of teams to start out his Pro career as OBE are good at developing young riders and giving them time to do so.
 
Seen as a classics rider especially on cobbles - So think PR, MSR, GW, AGR - He's a touch quicker in the sprints than Matthews, and you would think he could get quicker - He'll be an excellent sprinter for the Giro and the Vuelta.

Rode most of the cobbled races this year but was given little freedom by OBE - He also rode the Eneco Tour in 2015 showing promise, and had good finish in a stage - Unsure whether he will ride the Eneco tour this year, but is on the startlist for the Primus Classic on Saturday.
 
Oct 10, 2015
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WheelofGear said:
Orica has so many puncheurs. Ewan, Cort, Mezgec, Matthews, Gerrans, Albasini.
Well Ewan's not a puncheur, I wouldn't call Mezgec one either and Matthews is out the door
 
Sorry to interrupt the thread here, but can you help me, and the commentators and sites that list riders, out a bit here?
I'm sure it has been raised before, but I am never confident with Danish three pronged names.

I'm guessing (option A) from the name you give the thread that the principle surname/family name/means of identifying him among several Manguses (Magni?) is "Cort", and that Nielsen is an addition that can be used in formal settings (comparable to the Spanish maternal surnames, eg Contador Velasco.

Or is it B): his surname is Cort Nielsen, but it is not too much of a faux pas to abbreviate that to Cort in some informal circumstances or as a shorthand (equivalent to commentators sometimes calling Tao Geoghegan-Hart as "Geoghegan")?

Or C), is it analogous to the Russian practice whereby the familiar form would be to call him Magnus Cort, but Magnus Nielsen is more formal (eg Vladimir Putin is Vladimir Vladimirovitch to his friends)? And if this is the case, where does the division fall between intimacy and disinterest?

Or D (I don't think it is this, but included for completeness) his given names are Magnus Cort, but more like Jean-Christophe Peraud, and less like Christopher Clive Froome, it is normal practice to give both names.

It may, of course, be none of the above.

Part of my confusion arises from the inconsistency in the way that Anglopone media present these names to us:

Chris Juul-Jensen is presented as a hyphenated surname, but with for example Jesper Juul Andreasen, Juul is shown as a forename (could this be due to a an unaware Dublin registrar, similar to Anglo-Turkish footballer Colin Kazim-Richards being given a double barrelled surname by a registrar who did not recognise Kazim as a Turkish given name?)

Some trinomials are recognisable (or maybe Anglos simply assume they are) as two forenames (Lasse Norman Hansen, Mads Frank Hansen, and non-cyclist Hans Christian Andersen)

Some seem, because of known relationships, to be two family names (the brothers Soren and Asbjorn Kragh Andersen), but sometimes known family relationships suggest the opposite (Bjarne Lykkegard Riis and his son Thomas Nybo Riis)

Sometimes we consistently get either the third or all three names (Bak, or Lars Ytting Bak, but never Lars Bak or Ytting Bak: similarly for Chris Anker Sorensen), but sometimes we are normally given a name structure that seems familiar to Anglophones, and then read an additional surname occasionally (Michael Morkov Christiensen), and sometimes we are given either the second, or both second and third, names as surnames (Michael Valgren Andersen, Michael Carbel Svendgaard),

We poor ignorant anglophones get easily confused, you see....
 
Jun 22, 2014
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Heh, with Portuguese riders we have the weird matter of seeing most races list them by their full names, as in Rui Alberto Faria da Costa and shorter variations. Whereas any Portuguese national will always refer to them as simply Rui Costa or André Cardoso as you would for most other countries - though family name comes last as opposed to Spanish style (Alberto Contador Velasco).

As for Cort, Wikipedia lists him as Magnus Cort and a search for Cort lists it as a surname in multiple countries. Goin' with Magnus Cort. His sprint in Madrid was magnificent. Hope to see him against a proper sprinting field soon. :)
 
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claude cat said:
He had a pretty solid Paris Roubaix this year IIRC.
Didn't he ride with Hayman in the breakaway for a long time?
He certainly was, don't know if he had a mechanical that caused him to drop off but he was certainly there for a long time and that got my notice.

Was interested to see how he fared at this Vuelta, maybe less so for results but to see what his chemistry was with the rest of the team. This was answered in spades with the "Maggie, you F'n legend" from Yates after his 1st stage win as well as the BSPs AND his responses after his wins.

His stage wins were great but it was his rides as part of those two major "set piece operations" by the team which ticked even bigger boxes for me. Not only is the guy quick enough to win high level but he's potentially a very significant asset to the team going forward. He's seen as a cobbles prospect but he can certainly climb well enough which suggests that you could potentially add MSR, Amstel to his one day program. Furthermore, he's shown that you can take him to a GT and be a fully productive member of a GC plan.

Its highly likely he's going to be receiving some offers come 2nd half of 2017 but I doubt OBE are going to be letting him go without a fight. With the extra cobbles races on the WT next year, they may give him protected rider status at at least a couple and barring injury, he should going to at least one GT. A couple of years ago, OBE may've been seen as just a good "mid range"team with strong niche capacities; now you can arguably say they ARE, or are close to being, one of the "major" teams. Would he be better off (other than maybe $$$wise) elsewhere would be the question he and his manager would have to consider.
 
Aug 13, 2011
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RedheadDane said:
Hugo Koblet said:
Where does "Maggie" come from? "Concort" is much cooler :D
It's what they call him on the team. Apparently "Magnus" is too hard to pronounce. When they try they do it with a hard 'g', silly anglos. :p
lol, no. It's just how Australians give each other nicknames by shortening either a persons first or last name, placing an emphasis on lengthening a vowel.

Just like Simon Gerrans is referred to as Gerro in the team.

There's much more to it than that. Such a nickname is only used by mates or members in a tightly knit sporting team. Sometimes a nickname can have more than one meaning or role (sorry this is hard to explain), but only those involved in giving the nickname will fully understand all nuances involved in the nickname.

Not all names can be shortened so some times we use the persons name in another language as a nickname, so a person with the first name such as Peter might be called Pedro or Panioti.

Sometimes a person gets a nickname that has nothing to do with their name, but has more to do with their personality or role with in a team, or group of friends. An example would be Neil Stephens nickname being The Sheriff which will can be shortened to just Sheriff in certain situations.
 
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Armchair cyclist said:
In Denmark you can only have one last name and several first names. So Nielsen is his last name and Magnus Cort are his first names (like Christopher Juul Jensen: Jensen is the last name, and Christopher Juul are his first names). However, many don't know this and incorrectly assume that Cort Nielsen are his last names and use Cort as his principal last name and leave out Nielsen (like Alberto Contador Velasco is usually just called Alberto Contador).

Many secondary first names in Denmark aren't names you would use as a principal first name. For instance, Cort is not a name you would use as a principal first name - you would never meet some one in Denmark just named Cort Nielsen.

In Denmark, he's also referred to as simply Magnus Cort which I guess is part ignorance and part convenience. There's a better flow in "Magnus Cort" than in "Magnus Nielsen" and the latter is a fairly common name in Denmark (or at least it could be), so it's easier to identify him by using Magnus Cort.

Magnus Nielsen was also the name of a very famous person in Danish history and myth (he was the son of a Danish king Niels - Nielsen comes from "son of niels") as he killed a competitor for the crown Knud Lavard (who was actually Magnus' cousin) which sparked a civil war that lasted for three years.
 
This is still pretty inconsistent. I just can't figure out any general rule here:

Michael Morkov Christensen
Lars Ytting Bak
Michael Valgren Andersen
Rasmus Christian Quaade
Jonas Aaen Jorgensen
Trols Ronning Vinther
Mads Würtz Schmidt
Lasse Norman Hansen

etc.
 
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Bye Bye Bicycle said:
This is still pretty inconsistent. I just can't figure out any general rule here:

Michael Morkov Christensen
Lars Ytting Bak
Michael Valgren Andersen
Rasmus Christian Quaade
Jonas Aaen Jorgensen
Trols Ronning Vinther
Mads Würtz Schmidt
Lasse Norman Hansen

etc.
Many of those are still wrong, at least in terms of what name they should be referred to. They should all be referred to the last name in their name: ie. Michael Mørkøv Christensen, Michael Valgren Andersen etc. In Danish - and international media - they are, however, often referred to in a technically wrong way, for instance Michael Valgren, Mads Würtz, Lasse Norman etc.
 
Feb 20, 2016
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Isn't it simply, for the most part - mothers surname, fathers surname (or mothers-mothers, fathers-fathers in some cases).

Rasmus Christian seems like two forenames.
Lasse Norman could be both I guess and so on.

I like Maggie, but as a fan I'm not sure if you should go about taking his autograph by shouting Maggie!

Well, most danes have a good sense of humour so don't think it will be much of a problem.

The use of Cort I guess is only because Nielsen is such an usual name, so it's not properly identifyable.
 
Re: Re:

Hugo Koblet said:
Bye Bye Bicycle said:
This is still pretty inconsistent. I just can't figure out any general rule here:

Michael Morkov Christensen
Lars Ytting Bak
Michael Valgren Andersen
Rasmus Christian Quaade
Jonas Aaen Jorgensen
Trols Ronning Vinther
Mads Würtz Schmidt
Lasse Norman Hansen

etc.
Many of those are still wrong, at least in terms of what name they should be referred to. They should all be referred to the last name in their name: ie. Michael Mørkøv Christensen, Michael Valgren Andersen etc. In Danish - and international media - they are, however, often referred to in a technically wrong way, for instance Michael Valgren, Mads Würtz, Lasse Norman etc.
No. They are referred to in media and everywhere by other people by the name that distinguish from others called Christensen and so on. There are no general rules.

The reason that Cort is used for the last names Cort Nielsen, Valgren for Valgren Andersen or Holm for Holm Sørensen is the same as with Spanish names. There are a lot of people in Spain with names like Fernandez and Gonzalez and a lot of people in Denmark with the same names. To distinguish the first family name is used.

Hyphenated names exist independently of this. Oh, it's Juul-Jensen and 'Juul' is not a first name anyway. Also 'Norman' is his first family name like the above, not a first name. But 'Anker' in Chris Anker Sørensen's name is his second first name. So it's correct to label him 'Sørensen' if you want to go by his last name. Then with Bak I guess since neither of his family names are very common he or his family has chosen to 'Bak' most.
 
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Thepirateisgood said:
Isn't it simply, for the most part - mothers surname, fathers surname (or mothers-mothers, fathers-fathers in some cases).

Rasmus Christian seems like two forenames.
Lasse Norman could be both I guess and so on.

I like Maggie, but as a fan I'm not sure if you should go about taking his autograph by shouting Maggie!

Well, most danes have a good sense of humour so don't think it will be much of a problem.

The use of Cort I guess is only because Nielsen is such an usual name, so it's not properly identifyable.
Yes, this is correct. Many danes have a forename and two surnames (although only one is officially a surname).

And yes, the use of Cort is because Nielsen is such a common name, which is the explanation for most other Danish riders who are referred to by their second forename:

For instance, Andersen is the 5th most common surname in Denmark, Nielsen the most common, Hansen the 3rd most common, Christensen the 6th most common.
 

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