The "Where did you ride your bike today?" Thread...

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wheresmybrakes said:
Starting to up the mileage in my legs in preparation for the Velo Birmingham 100 miler. I've been getting in 50+ miles in recently but I've been having problems with my toes and feet getting numb. I've tried changing the saddle to a more narrower one and trying slightly different height positions to no avail, also the shoes are a half size too big which gives me plenty of room so it's not as though my feet are squashed in the shoes. Has anyone else come across this problem before? It normally starts to get numb after about 30 miles or so which means every now and then I have to either unclip a foot at a time and wiggle my leg to get some of the blood flow going or stop and walk around for a minute or so. Any advice would be great.
If your shoes are too big there's a possibility that your foot is moving forward and squashing into the end of the shoe. Make sure the strap closest to your leg is done up well enough so your foot won't move forward.

Are you using road or MTB cleats?
 
I was doing okay the last two weeks with o/a 230 km and 4300 m of climbing. Was pretty much bonking hard on my first 3h+ ride of the year though, the last climb (Königstuhl from the southeast) with 7.9 km @ 5.6 % was pure horror, although the gradient seems nice to just roll up there the middle section is actually quite a bit steeper, the steepest ramps are something like 15 %, that's only very short though.
Unfortunately my spring motivation was hampered now by a stomach virus but I hope to return to the road for the weekend.
 
Well, I did my "Ringaden Ride", a slightly extended version.
First of all, I had to actually get to the south-end, so I went out to Viborgvej, down to Ringaden, and out to the end.
Then I decided I might as well continue out to the stadium.
Finally, when I got to the other end, I didn't realise/forgot that Dr Margrethes Vej becomes Grenåvej in that intersection, so... I almost* ended up in Grenå, but hey! Haven't we all done stuff like that?
(Then I turned back, and went down to my parents, who live near the university.)






*I'm exagerating(sp?) here, I didn't even make it to Ringvejen.
 
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RedheadDane said:
Well, I did my "Ringaden Ride", a slightly extended version.
First of all, I had to actually get to the south-end, so I went out to Viborgvej, down to Ringaden, and out to the end.
Then I decided I might as well continue out to the stadium.
Finally, when I got to the other end, I didn't realise/forgot that Dr Margrethes Vej becomes Grenåvej in that intersection, so... I almost* ended up in Grenå, but hey! Haven't we all done stuff like that?
(Then I turned back, and went down to my parents, who live near the university.)


*I'm exagerating(sp?) here, I didn't even make it to Ringvejen.
Aw, I should have known, I could have painted RHD on the road and cheered you on as I live just a few hundred metres from Ringgaden (you realise there are two g's there, right (as there also is in exaggerating)) :D

Nice to see you exploit the lovely summer temperatures we are enjoying currently...
 
I'm planning a trip to Vejle in a few weeks.

How many of you guys from Denmark are familiar with the hills in that area? I've been there before but only once. Which hill(s) to you find the hardest?

I remember Højen Skovvej being pretty epic. The surrounding trees give you a lot of oxygen to the brain. But it is not recommended as a descent since there are many holes in the bottom. It's only 1km at 7-8% but it's still going uphill for another k after you leave the forest. When you leave the forest, it's like being in Belgium. You get really close to the rural landscape.
 
Re:

Velolover2 said:
I'm planning a trip to Vejle in a few weeks.

How many of you guys from Denmark are familiar with the hills in that area? I've been there before but only once. Which hill(s) to you find the hardest?

I remember Højen Skovvej being pretty epic. The surrounding trees give you a lot of oxygen to the brain. But it is not recommended as a descent since there are many holes in the bottom. It's only 1km at 7-8% but it's still going uphill for another k after you leave the forest. When you leave the forest, it's like being in Belgium. You get really close to the rural landscape.
The hardest: Gl. Kongevej (especially if you take the first part on Chr. Winthers Vej, which is the steepest street in Denmark).

The most spectacular: Munkebjerg which is also very hard and has a few hairpin bends.

The most famous: Kiddesvej. Not as hard but still quite steep and with a lot of inscriptions on the road from PNDR it has a nice vibe.

And there are more but I haven't been riding there that many times.
 
wheresmybrakes said:
Starting to up the mileage in my legs in preparation for the Velo Birmingham 100 miler. I've been getting in 50+ miles in recently but I've been having problems with my toes and feet getting numb. I've tried changing the saddle to a more narrower one and trying slightly different height positions to no avail, also the shoes are a half size too big which gives me plenty of room so it's not as though my feet are squashed in the shoes. Has anyone else come across this problem before? It normally starts to get numb after about 30 miles or so which means every now and then I have to either unclip a foot at a time and wiggle my leg to get some of the blood flow going or stop and walk around for a minute or so. Any advice would be great.
Cleat position!!!!

Move cleats back. Should be such that pedal spindle is slightly (ie a few mm) behind ball of big toe
 
Re: Re:

tobydawq said:
RedheadDane said:
Well, I did my "Ringaden Ride", a slightly extended version.
First of all, I had to actually get to the south-end, so I went out to Viborgvej, down to Ringaden, and out to the end.
Then I decided I might as well continue out to the stadium.
Finally, when I got to the other end, I didn't realise/forgot that Dr Margrethes Vej becomes Grenåvej in that intersection, so... I almost* ended up in Grenå, but hey! Haven't we all done stuff like that?
(Then I turned back, and went down to my parents, who live near the university.)


*I'm exagerating(sp?) here, I didn't even make it to Ringvejen.
Aw, I should have known, I could have painted RHD on the road and cheered you on as I live just a few hundred metres from Ringgaden (you realise there are two g's there, right (as there also is in exaggerating)) :D

Nice to see you exploit the lovely summer temperatures we are enjoying currently...
Well… English is hard!
And so is spelling the name of a road I ride along about twice a week… :eek:
Anyway, dunno whereabout near Ringgaden you live, but if you were anywhere near Grenåvej, and saw some idiot almost falling over... then that was probably me…
 
Re: Re:

tobydawq said:
Velolover2 said:
I'm planning a trip to Vejle in a few weeks.

How many of you guys from Denmark are familiar with the hills in that area? I've been there before but only once. Which hill(s) to you find the hardest?

I remember Højen Skovvej being pretty epic. The surrounding trees give you a lot of oxygen to the brain. But it is not recommended as a descent since there are many holes in the bottom. It's only 1km at 7-8% but it's still going uphill for another k after you leave the forest. When you leave the forest, it's like being in Belgium. You get really close to the rural landscape.
The hardest: Gl. Kongevej (especially if you take the first part on Chr. Winthers Vej, which is the steepest street in Denmark).

The most spectacular: Munkebjerg which is also very hard and has a few hairpin bends.

The most famous: Kiddesvej. Not as hard but still quite steep and with a lot of inscriptions on the road from PNDR it has a nice vibe.

And there are more but I haven't been riding there that many times.
Thanks! Excluding the tunnel, Munkebjerg seems to be on a quite broad road compared to the narrow nature of the Vejle climbs.

The Østengård hill is another 1 km climb about 8%. Those hills are comparable to the worst climbs in AGR. They are a bit shorter but steeper than those in Amstel. You could make a great hilly Ardennes-ish classic in that region if you wanted to.

The Danes almost deserve a WT race with all the strong newcorners and old legends. It could be placed as a warm-up up race to the Ardennes after Roubaix but before Amstel.

All the teams not racing Brabantse Pijl could be racing the Vejle Classic. But it shouldn't end on Kiddesvej. That would ruin the signature stage of the Tour of Denmark. You could make the finish flat so the climbs would be raced more aggressively. Perhaps with that muro-climb (Gl. Kongevej) you talked about as the last hill.
 
Yeah, Munkebjerg is actually not in Vejle, you have to ride six kilometres on a beach road (it's called Strandvej in Danish, but as I write this I realise that the term beach road in English probably sounds like it's not asphalted which isn't the case at all) until you get there. And yes, it's quite a broad road but a peloton would get really constricted at the buttom due to the narrow tunnel.

I think a one-day race in this region would be fantastic but it can't collide with the Brabantse Pijl because all the people who want to ride such a race that day do it in Belgium.
 
Yes, you are correct. Placing it in the autumn season might be a better choice. There is more space on the late calender. Perhaps, you could add it somewhere between Hamburg, Bretagne and the Canadian classics. The potential of rain would make it harder.
 
Completed the Velo Birmingham 100 mile bike ride today! Well chuffed. Last 20 miles was a killer but I got round and raised over £400 quid for a local charity that I volunteer at a few days a week. Think I'll wait a while for the next one. :lol:
 
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tobydawq said:
Especially in this lovely wind we apparently will never get rid of.

Did you average 450 watts?
Lmao

I cant afford (or dont really want to spend) that much on stuff that really doesnt make my bike go faster, but I reckon its about 250-270 watts or something like that? No clue. :D
 
Happy for all you who are riding in fresh air with trees and climbs and descents. I have been "riding" in my garage since January. :cry:

I was diagnosed with a sequestered disc fragment from my L4. Had to cease road riding for fear of permanent nerve damage. Waiting for an op to remove the fragment (this month). Since then I have been limited to short but intense trainer / Zwift sessions in my garage that don't put undue pressure on my lumber. Very boring but have kind of got used to it.

According to my Garmin my FTP is higher today than it was in January. Looking forward to getting back on the road I think I might actually climb better based upon the numbers. Two years ago I invested in the Wahoo KicrR for rainy days. But a smart trainer has been a godsend to stay fit whilst I wait for my op. Great technology.
 
I am in quite terrible shape as I have not gone for more than a handful rides this year (I don't think I am even close to 1000 km's this year, which is pretty bad). Nevertheless, I decided to ride 107 km on my own today, because the weather was/is 27 degrees c.

The trip went from the outer city of Copenhagen to Roskilde Fjord and back again from Frederikssund (it forms a triangle if you look at it a map). Unfortunately, I did not really plan for how the wind would be, so I ended up having to ride all the open headwind roads back home, when I was already quite tired. That was brutal...

I am surprised that I managed almost 30km/h, though, as riding in the city will usually take something out of your average speed and considering that I was really done for the last 30km's or so.
 
Arrived Saturday where we did Vaujnay (5 km, 9,5%) and then Pas de la Confession (13 km, 6,5%) which another way up to Alpe d Huez. It was the day before Granfondo Vaujany where we did Col de La Morte, Col d' Ornon, Pas de la Confession-Alpe d' Huez-Col de la Sarenne (1500 metres of altitude gain) and then Vaujany. That race was 175 km long and was ridden in blazing hot temperatues. I had cramps beginning at Alpe, then Sarenne and was just totally finished at Vaujany. Without a doubt the most brutal 5 km I have ridden.. ended up clocking in at 7 hours and 20 minutes, which is a decent time all things considered. That last climb was a total battlefield, all of us were totally ***. My Garmin was at 45 degrees in the sun at the bottom of Vaujany, in the middle of the day, after 170 km and 3500 metres of altitude gain. Insane experience. Loved it and hated it.

Croix de Fer and Alpe d' Huez then today. First time on both these climbs, have climbed Alpe two times, both not from the classic Bourg d Oisans-side. Croix de Fer is fantastic, L' Alpe is just mythical and super, super hot, especially in the middle of the day. The first two kilometres are pretty brutal. Thats 100 km for you on a rest and recon ride before Marmotte next Sunday. 2700 altitude gain, but with low heart rate.

Tomorrow we are gonna ride Les Deux Alpes and Alpe d Huez again (we live at the top). Thats a bit under 2000 altitude gain, but again it will be slow.

Then we are gonna ride another race, this time only 40 km, but Alpe d Huez, descend from Confession down to the bottom of Vaujany. Will be super hard, 1700 altitude meters and pretty high gradients. Friday just a time trial on Alpe d Huez, I want to go absolutely all out there since me and my friend have a bet. Trying to go under 55 min. Dno if I can do that.

Sunday is the big test, Glandon, Telegraphe-Galibier and Alpe d Huez. Hopefully won't be 35 degrees that day like at the Vaujany Granfondo.

This is an absolutely amazing experience for me. Really love climbing, especially really long marathons climbs like Croix de Fer/Glandon. 2 hours of cycling porn really. Amazing stuff.
 
That sounds amazing, Valv! Glandon, Galibier, Alpe is a proper Queen stage. Keep us updated whether you won your bet ;)
I hope to make it to the western Alps later this year in september. So far my season has been going well and I managed to build some decent endurance. My climbing is still shitty though, just way to heavy. My hardest training climbs have something like 420 m of elevation (Weißer Stein and Königstuhl in the medium mountain range Odenwald) and I've never ridden something longer, so the Alps are definitely gonna be something.
Tomorrow 110 km with 1700 m of climbing on the schedule, finally a long ride again after all that heat discouraged me.
 
I lost. Literally with *** 5 seconds. 13,8 km, 55 minutes...

So far I have climbed:
Col de la Morte
Ornon
Pas de la Confession (West Alpe)
Alpe d' Huez
Col de la Sarenne (East Alpe)
Col de la Bérarde
Glandon/Croix-de-Fer
Vaujany (5 km, 7 km in the next race, a little above Vaujany, same climb).

.. only Gaiibier left now. Would be fun to climb Chamrousse as well, but oh well, maybe next time.

I loved Croix, obviously, but also Sarenne. They are kinda similar if you go all the way down from the main road from Sarenne and the 'easy' Croix de Fer-side. Ornon is boring, Col de la Morte was great, West Alpe is somewhat easy, Alpe d Huez is just boring by knew (have climbed it 5 times). But still, hella hard. Unfriend people who say its not really hard, just a known climb. Bérarde was fun as well.
 
Today I rode from my hometown to Brixen, a small climb at the start, then Furcia and right after that Erbe from Zwischenwasser, probably the hardest side. Over 2,200m of altitude gain and the funny thimg is that I suffered a lot more on the easier but irregular Furcia, I just prefer regular climbs, even if they are steeper.
 
Aug 8, 2019
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Today I rode up Lookout Mountain in Golden, Colorado. I started in Denver, so I had about 10 miles to ride to the foot of the mountain and about 5 or 6 miles of climbing. This is my fourth time on my bike after a five-year hiatus. I had a great, if slow, ride!

I was released from prison a short time ago. I spent five years living in a 7" x 10" cell with limited access to a gym and walking track and absolutely no access to any type of cycling equipment.

To feel the thrill of cycling like I did as a teenager while I am in my 50's is complete joy. I saw many other riders on the climb and had good chats with a few of them. There is nothing like the sweet freedom that cycling offers.
 

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