Todays idiot masters fattie doper

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Mar 18, 2009
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spetsa said:
That is funny, just last evening while the wife and I were out for dinner and a couple Left Hands minding our own business a "cycling community aquaintance" approached me at the bar to tell me about his recent "race" where he broke 15 hours and attributed it to the new gels that he used.
Question: How do you know if someone at your party did a triathlon?
Answer: He'll tell you.
 
Aug 6, 2009
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Remember the guys who didn't play sports in high school or college because they weren't good enough? And due to a monumental sense of entitlement, seethed with impotent rage all the way into adulthood because they couldn't deal with someone, anyone being "better" than they were at anything?

Well, they are the ones wreaking havoc on our sport with their type-A idiocies and pent-up frustrations.

Everything has to be a competition. Everything has to be a race. Everything has to be about "personal best".

"I need a carbon fiber bike that is 30 grams lighter and that much stiffer to help me climb". How many times has anyone heard that in a high-end bike shop?

These are the cats who are driving the PED market in the states, which consists of three pipelines-

1) Anti-aging clinics.

2) Latin America.

3) Home-grown drugs from domestic labs, which have no quality control and are usually dispensed via word of mouth between hard-core body builders.

Get into the right pipeline, and that plastic medal and $20 gift card to Blimpie's can be yours at the next CAT-5 circuit race.
 
Aug 3, 2010
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Berzin said:
Remember the guys who didn't play sports in high school or college because they weren't good enough? And due to a monumental sense of entitlement, seethed with impotent rage all the way into adulthood because they couldn't deal with someone, anyone being "better" than they were at anything?

Well, they are the ones wreaking havoc on our sport with their type-A idiocies and pent-up frustrations.

Everything has to be a competition. Everything has to be a race. Everything has to be about "personal best".

"I need a carbon fiber bike that is 30 grams lighter and that much stiffer to help me climb". How many times has anyone heard that in a high-end bike shop?
These are the cats who are driving the PED market in the states, which consists of three pipelines-

1) Anti-aging clinics.

2) Latin America.

3) Home-grown drugs from domestic labs, which have no quality control and are usually dispensed via word of mouth between hard-core body builders.
Or a bigger chain ring because they are spinning out their 53x11.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
slowoldman said:
It is sad and pathetic what ego can do to people. Racing should be a hobby for people my age (46) and I can't comprehend why people can't just enjoy it for what it is. I've said it before and I'll say it again, if you dope to compete against a bunch of old guys you are pitiful.
+1

Racing is a hobby... it's thrilling and I don't remember the last time I (personally) had a result of note.

The only thing I'm real competitive at anymore is beer tasting.:)
 
Oct 11, 2010
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Hooptie said:
You guys are so quick to judge, this straightens everything out :roll eyes:

Statement written by Tony Byatt as a translation service for Roger Hernandez of Miami, Florida, as to reasons for refusal to submit to a post race, in competition drug test:

I was confused as a result of a very long day of competition and just losing a second race to a talented competitor. Passion and temper were both running high.

After thirty years as a competitor in the sport, I always thought that it was the winner that was to be tested. Had I won, I would have gladly submitted but as a second place finisher, I felt that there was some ulterior motive to the test.

It was explained to me that the test was random. However, the transparency to this randomness was non existent. No presentation was made to the riders as to what number or what finisher was to be tested. Once, again, I felt that I was being singled out for undisclosed reasons.

I was concerned that my image could be damaged by a urine test whose testing procedures and laboratory affiliations were unknown to me. In light of all of the recent high profile allegations about drug tests being manipulated in one way or another, I was not sure that a fair test was possible.

I also felt that I had been unjustly selected as the only Hispanic person on the podium. There was a general strangeness to how all of the events passed.

After returning to the hotel and calming down, some of the procedures were explained to me in my own language that I might better understand. Once I understood that the bottles are sealed by me, that I could request split labs or additional samples for independent lab testing, I returned to the velodrome the following morning to present myself for testing. The USADA officials called to see if it would be allowed and the determination was made that I would not be allowed to test, having previously refused. It should be noted that I arrived within 12 hours of the original test request and, to my knowledge, there exists no method of sanitizing a sample in so short a period. For this reason, Janet Bailey, of the USADA asked that I prepare a statement as to my reasons for refusal at the first request. Between the language barrier and my unfamiliarity with the procedures, the culmination of a long, hard day of competition, and a second place performance, I was in no way prepared to submit myself to what I felt was a personal attack.

Respectfully Submitted
LMAO -- that is, without question, the worst explanation I have ever heard
 
Jun 19, 2009
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Berzin said:
Remember the guys who didn't play sports in high school or college because they weren't good enough? And due to a monumental sense of entitlement, seethed with impotent rage all the way into adulthood because they couldn't deal with someone, anyone being "better" than they were at anything?

Well, they are the ones wreaking havoc on our sport with their type-A idiocies and pent-up frustrations.

Everything has to be a competition. Everything has to be a race. Everything has to be about "personal best".

"I need a carbon fiber bike that is 30 grams lighter and that much stiffer to help me climb". How many times has anyone heard that in a high-end bike shop?

These are the cats who are driving the PED market in the states, which consists of three pipelines-

1) Anti-aging clinics.

2) Latin America.

3) Home-grown drugs from domestic labs, which have no quality control and are usually dispensed via word of mouth between hard-core body builders.

Get into the right pipeline, and that plastic medal and $20 gift card to Blimpie's can be yours at the next CAT-5 circuit race.
To be sure there are a large number of "business professionals" that find their large incomes still don't provide the social currency they thought would come with success. They are cycling in droves here and some are like the preceding forumites describe.
I've managed to meet quite a few that were also thoughtful team players and former "fringe sports" guys from soccer, running, skiing (fringe in the US) and they are great dudes. Nice enough and supportive enough to keep me in the sport when my former teammates have fallen by the wayside with injuries and lost will. You really just have to ignore those personalities and deal with the problem of PEDs your own way. We need the federations we pay money to regulate to do the f*cking job, even if our National teams suck. Unfortunately the USOC and sponsors supporting federations (see Mr. Weisel) have other ideas on what is marketable and what isn't.
 
Jul 30, 2009
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spetsa said:
Granted Andrew was only smokin the good stuff and having fun racing his bike. Still doesn't look too good:eek:
When I do all age group events I wish more young dudes got baked off their asses the night before a race...
 
Feb 10, 2010
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Oldman said:
We need the federations we pay money to regulate to do the f*cking job, even if our National teams suck. Unfortunately the USOC and sponsors supporting federations (see Mr. Weisel) have other ideas on what is marketable and what isn't.
How is that going to happen when one of the main guys behind the myth owns USA Cycling? A **tiny** number of people objected to Weisel giving Johnson his job and showing the prior CEO the door when the prior CEO dared to actually do his job and run USAC with some transparency and consistency.

The membership has chosen to let their domestic sport be populated with dopers. They would rather their local sport recreate highschool drama and cast stones at the ones that get caught than fix their federation.
 
Aug 10, 2010
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DirtyWorks said:
How is that going to happen when one of the main guys behind the myth owns USA Cycling? A **tiny** number of people objected to Weisel giving Johnson his job and showing the prior CEO the door when the prior CEO dared to actually do his job and run USAC with some transparency and consistency.

The membership has chosen to let their domestic sport be populated with dopers. They would rather their local sport recreate highschool drama and cast stones at the ones that get caught than fix their federation.
Is it ethical, then, to remain a contributing member in such a corrupt organization? If membership dues support doping, and a person knows that is the case, how can that person ethically remain a member?
 
Apr 9, 2009
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MarkvW said:
Is it ethical, then, to remain a contributing member in such a corrupt organization? If membership dues support doping, and a person knows that is the case, how can that person ethically remain a member?
It sucks but if you want to race you have to buy a USAC license.
 
Feb 10, 2010
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MarkvW said:
Is it ethical, then, to remain a contributing member in such a corrupt organization? If membership dues support doping, and a person knows that is the case, how can that person ethically remain a member?
I'm not a member. I don't do USAC sanctioned events because of the serious problems inside that federation.

If you ride in Oregon or Colorado, the majority of events are done by independent federations. Much of American track racing is now done by independent federations. The bulk of USAC's members are in California. There's at least one independent federation doing events there. All good news.

However, USAC has a Federally sanctioned monopoly on bike racing. The smallest events have costs well below going DIY. (anti-competitive) Even if California racing went independent, they still have the USOC/IOC recognition via the UCI. As it is, the UCI is setting up racing in the U.S. to essentially import the entire UCI production. No domestic racing/racers needed.
 
Oct 25, 2010
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Altitude said:
LMAO -- that is, without question, the worst explanation I have ever heard
Wow, what agony. It took him 12 hours to jam that catheter up his johnson and get some good urine in his system?
 
Oct 25, 2010
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Scott SoCal said:
+1

Racing is a hobby... it's thrilling and I don't remember the last time I (personally) had a result of note.

The only thing I'm real competitive at anymore is beer tasting.:)
Someone asked me recently about how I could stomach competing for so many years and having endured so many painful hours and miles with so few victories. (Myself, I won precisely one event in my career. I was a very consistent 'top 10' guy in my prime.)

My answer: I trained so hard just to experience the satisfaction of "being there". And being there meant the world to me. To be able to hear that "eggbeater" noise go up and down with the accelerations, etc. I took away immense satisfaction if I had succeeded in making it to the last corner in position to potentially win. Coming in 5th in the sprint was an elating experience for me. Perhaps winning might have felt better? Perhaps. But getting to the fitness level (and racing competency level) to BE at that moment in time. That was always worth the effort. I was not addicted to winning. I was addicted to RACING. I loved the race itself. Some of my best memories involve "losing" a sprint, or getting passed on the final climb by riders whom I admire. Because I was THERE. I was doing it. I was experiencing the full deal. And I'd earned the right to be there. Sorta like a minor league player getting invited up to the "show" for a few games.

I suspect that the dopers and narccissists are not living for the race itself. They live for the post-race stories they tell.

And OMG, whoever made mention of that Ironman tatoo. Those guys are all a bunch of extreme "tools". A guy with a kid in my son's kindergarten class is always showing up in clothing that shows-off his ironman tatt. No matter what weather extreme. He has no idea that I used to mix it up with TDF competitors and probably have a lot more stories that I'll never bother to share with him. I'll just be the commoner without the ironman tatt. ;-)
 
Mar 18, 2009
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BotanyBay said:
Wow, what agony. It took him 12 hours to jam that catheter up his johnson and get some good urine in his system?
Give the bro some credit. After all those roids, he is working with some pretty small equipment. It takes time.
 
Aug 10, 2010
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BotanyBay said:
Someone asked me recently about how I could stomach competing for so many years and having endured so many painful hours and miles with so few victories. (Myself, I won precisely one event in my career. I was a very consistent 'top 10' guy in my prime.)

My answer: I trained so hard just to experience the satisfaction of "being there". And being there meant the world to me. To be able to hear that "eggbeater" noise go up and down with the accelerations, etc. I took away immense satisfaction if I had succeeded in making it to the last corner in position to potentially win. Coming in 5th in the sprint was an elating experience for me. Perhaps winning might have felt better? Perhaps. But getting to the fitness level (and racing competency level) to BE at that moment in time. That was always worth the effort. I was not addicted to winning. I was addicted to RACING. I loved the race itself. Some of my best memories involve "losing" a sprint, or getting passed on the final climb by riders whom I admire. Because I was THERE. I was doing it. I was experiencing the full deal. And I'd earned the right to be there. Sorta like a minor league player getting invited up to the "show" for a few games.

I suspect that the dopers and narccissists are not living for the race itself. They live for the post-race stories they tell.

And OMG, whoever made mention of that Ironman tatoo. Those guys are all a bunch of extreme "tools". A guy with a kid in my son's kindergarten class is always showing up in clothing that shows-off his ironman tatt. No matter what weather extreme. He has no idea that I used to mix it up with TDF competitors and probably have a lot more stories that I'll never bother to share with him. I'll just be the commoner without the ironman tatt. ;-)
Thanks for the insight.
 
Apr 10, 2009
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BotanyBay said:
Someone asked me recently about how I could stomach competing for so many years and having endured so many painful hours and miles with so few victories. (Myself, I won precisely one event in my career. I was a very consistent 'top 10' guy in my prime.)

My answer: I trained so hard just to experience the satisfaction of "being there". And being there meant the world to me. To be able to hear that "eggbeater" noise go up and down with the accelerations, etc. I took away immense satisfaction if I had succeeded in making it to the last corner in position to potentially win. Coming in 5th in the sprint was an elating experience for me. Perhaps winning might have felt better? Perhaps. But getting to the fitness level (and racing competency level) to BE at that moment in time. That was always worth the effort. I was not addicted to winning. I was addicted to RACING. I loved the race itself. Some of my best memories involve "losing" a sprint, or getting passed on the final climb by riders whom I admire. Because I was THERE. I was doing it. I was experiencing the full deal. And I'd earned the right to be there. Sorta like a minor league player getting invited up to the "show" for a few games.

I suspect that the dopers and narccissists are not living for the race itself. They live for the post-race stories they tell.
Couldn't have said it better myself.....thanks for putting it into words
 
Mar 18, 2009
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BotanyBay said:
And OMG, whoever made mention of that Ironman tatoo. Those guys are all a bunch of extreme "tools". A guy with a kid in my son's kindergarten class is always showing up in clothing that shows-off his ironman tatt. No matter what weather extreme.
Meet King D0uchebag.



At the New York marathon this portly tool was sporting a homemade sign on his back that said, "I did an Ironman in Florida yesterday." The funny thing is that he was eventually DQed from Ironman for cheating. He used scuba fins and missed the halfway timing mat on the bike. Google the IM Florida Finman story when you want a laugh.

MDot tattoos crack me up every time. I have done a bunch of 100 mile trail running races, I am not that impressed with walking an Ironman in 16 hours, and I have never seen another ultrarunner with the jerkbaggery like a "100" tattoo.

I think your comment about people doing races just so they can tell people they did them is pretty dang accurate. It is the one and done triathletes that do one Ironman and then they are finished with the sport. It's the reason why I think Leadville 100 MTB is such a joke these days. I knw four people who bought MTBs just so they could do Leadville.
 
Bertie said:
Can you support that claim? My claim is racing 5 years in Masters (40-49) and never once seeing any evidence of it, or suspecting anyone else of it. Speaking as I find.
i can. i have been racing longer the you and competed at the highest level masters events. you are kidding yourself.
 
Jul 4, 2009
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usedtobefast said:
i can. i have been racing longer the you and competed at the highest level masters events. you are kidding yourself.
...yup!!!...

Cheers

blutto
 
Aug 3, 2010
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BotanyBay said:
Someone asked me recently about how I could stomach competing for so many years and having endured so many painful hours and miles with so few victories. (Myself, I won precisely one event in my career. I was a very consistent 'top 10' guy in my prime.)

My answer: I trained so hard just to experience the satisfaction of "being there". And being there meant the world to me. To be able to hear that "eggbeater" noise go up and down with the accelerations, etc. I took away immense satisfaction if I had succeeded in making it to the last corner in position to potentially win. Coming in 5th in the sprint was an elating experience for me. Perhaps winning might have felt better? Perhaps. But getting to the fitness level (and racing competency level) to BE at that moment in time. That was always worth the effort. I was not addicted to winning. I was addicted to RACING. I loved the race itself. Some of my best memories involve "losing" a sprint, or getting passed on the final climb by riders whom I admire. Because I was THERE. I was doing it. I was experiencing the full deal. And I'd earned the right to be there. Sorta like a minor league player getting invited up to the "show" for a few games.

I suspect that the dopers and narccissists are not living for the race itself. They live for the post-race stories they tell.

And OMG, whoever made mention of that Ironman tatoo. Those guys are all a bunch of extreme "tools". A guy with a kid in my son's kindergarten class is always showing up in clothing that shows-off his ironman tatt. No matter what weather extreme. He has no idea that I used to mix it up with TDF competitors and probably have a lot more stories that I'll never bother to share with him. I'll just be the commoner without the ironman tatt. ;-)
People ask me similar questions all of the time, and it amazes me how few can comprehend the fact that I simply loved riding my bike. They ask about my greatest memories and expect heroic tales of winning races and how many times I raced against Lance, but hear stories of ridiculous things that happened on 7 hour training rides with friends in the snow or rain. I will get looks of confusion and counter stories of their recent PR at the local TT. I guess it is just the nature of people's thinking in this day and age. Everybody dreams of being a champion, feeling superior in some way.
I don't race at all any more, but am still fit. I find it hard to show up to the local training rides due to the fact that they are attended by people who think sitting in and winning stop ahead sign sprints is training. There are a couple individuals who win the majority of the sprints because only they contest them. These same people could not replicate the feat on race day if their life depended on it, but they still won the sprint. I would pull the group as hard as I could for the last 2k and lead out the sprint from 500 meters and watch a handful of guys come around me at the sign. I would get remarks about my wasted effort. They couldn't even comprehend the fact that in my races, it took that same effort to sit 10th wheel and even be there to contest a sprint or lead out a teammate. I was practicing sprinting, they were practicing winning.
My career was formed because I stumbled across my talent due to my desire to get on my bicycle every day after school as a teenager, not because I wanted to be a bike racer. A few years later I was a 20 year old just beginning to race internationally when Paul Kimmage's book "A Rough Ride" was relatively new and will never forget reading something to the extent that he looked back at the innocence and joy with which his life as a cyclist started and after reflecting on the turns that it took, he questioned why he bothered. I promised myself that I would always know why I bothered, and it is still the reason that I ride a bike.
 
Aug 10, 2010
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spetsa said:
People ask me similar questions all of the time, and it amazes me how few can comprehend the fact that I simply loved riding my bike. They ask about my greatest memories and expect heroic tales of winning races and how many times I raced against Lance, but hear stories of ridiculous things that happened on 7 hour training rides with friends in the snow or rain. I will get looks of confusion and counter stories of their recent PR at the local TT. I guess it is just the nature of people's thinking in this day and age. Everybody dreams of being a champion, feeling superior in some way.
I don't race at all any more, but am still fit. I find it hard to show up to the local training rides due to the fact that they are attended by people who think sitting in and winning stop ahead sign sprints is training. There are a couple individuals who win the majority of the sprints because only they contest them. These same people could not replicate the feat on race day if their life depended on it, but they still won the sprint. I would pull the group as hard as I could for the last 2k and lead out the sprint from 500 meters and watch a handful of guys come around me at the sign. I would get remarks about my wasted effort. They couldn't even comprehend the fact that in my races, it took that same effort to sit 10th wheel and even be there to contest a sprint or lead out a teammate. I was practicing sprinting, they were practicing winning.
My career was formed because I stumbled across my talent due to my desire to get on my bicycle every day after school as a teenager, not because I wanted to be a bike racer. A few years later I was a 20 year old just beginning to race internationally when Paul Kimmage's book "A Rough Ride" was relatively new and will never forget reading something to the extent that he looked back at the innocence and joy with which his life as a cyclist started and after reflecting on the turns that it took, he questioned why he bothered. I promised myself that I would always know why I bothered, and it is still the reason that I ride a bike.
It seems to me that riders that share your attitudes would be more angry at the dopers if doping messed up the quality of the race and less angry about the effect on the results of the race.

Does doping muck with the character of the race itself? How?
 

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