Tour de France 2020 | Stage 20 ITT (Lure - La Planche des Belles Filles, 36.2km)

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Which that I usually enjoy TT's or that I didn't enjoy this one? I have major issues with the horrible coverage of this ITT to start with not mention some unbelievable performances. I won't say more here on the last part.
We can probably all agree the TV production was horrendous.

But we can probably also all agree, that the drama was epic nonetheless?

:cool:
 
Jul 10, 2016
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Im pretty happy that Pog win, he was the only rider that try, that attack, that want the victory. Dont remember one single attack from Roglic, only in the last 500 meters and 2-3 times.
When he was strong, like in Loze, he didnt capitalize it. Also he is thinking in the stage after the croswinds, that he left pogacar go.
I hope that this is a lesson for all and try to capitalize the oportunities when they are there. You need to attack to win.
 
Yes and no. Part of what I was watching we (husband and I) were having a very hard time believing.

I'm happy for Porte to get a podium while leading a team.
With your profile pic and your obsession with Bala I sometimes I forget you are not him so anytime you mention the husband I picture Bala wrapped up on the couch with some big bear dude
 
Didn't think this was possible. Pogacar the complete package then.
To think he had the ability to go as fast as Dumoulin on the flat and faster than anyone else ever did on the PDBF on the same day.

*** me sideways.
TTs at the end of a GT, especially, is always about what you have left in the legs. Sheer TT ability becomes secondary. You start good and gain momentum, you might unlock strength you didn’t thought was there and be able to push on. If it goes in the other way, you might lose it all. It is quite amazing how much the psychological aspects can affect the outcome.
 
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I think it’s less likely that riders will suddenly peak or blossom at age 26 or 27. That was often a direct result of other things that were happening in cycling at the time. For example, comparing it to LA and Ullrich is kind of pointless.

But nothing in my comment precluded the possibility of a yet younger champion coming up in two or three years. It just seems that we are blessed with two or three generational talents all within a few years, so by simple probability, it would appear unlikely. But certainly not impossible.

You should listen to today’s ITV podcast and what David Millar and the others say about the present young generation and why it is blossoming at such an early age that was not possible 12 or even 20 years ago.
I think it’s been touched on in a few places, but a very big factor I think is the power meters and data that we have now (or more importantly, that the teams have access to now) that can tell the DS that “hey, this kid is actually your strongest rider, by a long shot too,” where before a 22 year old who came into the peloton would have to “serve his apprenticeship” and “learn his racecraft” by fetching water bottles and eating wind for an aging team leader pushing for a top 10.

It would have to be a truly out-there generational talent like an Ullrich or Armstrong to break through in that system and get team leadership aged 21 (and additionally, be a German/US rider, with a German/US team, specifically looking for that talent).

Case in point, the ‘83 Tour. Fignon was due to be Hinault’s water boy, until Hinault withdrew. And Roche and Anderson had to give up their own chances working in a French team for a French leader who was injured, and never repeated his performance again.

Transport Pogacar‘s career back to those days, and instead of leadership roles at GTs he might have spent last year and this domming for Dan Martin, Aru and Formolo. But instead, somebody at UAE looked at his data, said “y’know, the kid has something,” and gave him his shot.
 
I think it’s been touched on in a few places, but a very big factor I think is the power meters and data that we have now (or more importantly, that the teams have access to now) that can tell the DS that “hey, this kid is actually your strongest rider, by a long shot too,” where before a 22 year old who came into the peloton would have to “serve his apprenticeship” and “learn his racecraft” by fetching water bottles and eating wind for an aging team leader pushing for a top 10.

It would have to be a truly out-there generational talent like an Ullrich or Armstrong to break through in that system and get team leadership aged 21 (and additionally, be a German/US rider, with a German/US team, specifically looking for that talent).

Case in point, the ‘83 Tour. Fignon was due to be Hinault’s water boy, until Hinault withdrew. And Roche and Anderson had to give up their own chances working in a French team for a French leader who was injured, and never repeated his performance again.

Transport Pogacar‘s career back to those days, and instead of leadership roles at GTs he might have spent last year and this domming for Dan Martin, Aru and Formolo. But instead, somebody at UAE looked at his data, said “y’know, the kid has something,” and gave him his shot.
this.

wow. great analysis.
 
On one hand I'm glad someone finally derailed the train that sucked the life out of the race. On the other hand, that was absolutely out of this world insanity.

The thing I don't get is people defending Roglic's tactics. On the last two mountain stages alone he missed clear opportunities to out more time into Pog. He seemed to ride within himself on both occasions. Who knows, maybe Roglic wasn't as strong as he looked. But Pog was clearly close to his limit on stages 17 and 18. Maybe that made Roglic think he had enough in the tank for the TT.

Realistically though, a gap of less than a minute isn't comfortable. Froome could manage something like that with relative ease because he's been in that situation so many times and knows exactly what to do. Roglic not so much.
 
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