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Tour de France Tour de France 2024 route rumours and announcements

Page 18 - Get up to date with the latest news, scores & standings from the Cycling News Community.
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Well, I think it's a climb so hard that it couldn't help but create gaps larger than SPdBF. Those kind of rankings are always debatable but cyclingcols has this climb as their 2nd hardest in all of France, behind only Telegraphe+Galibier and in front of Col de la Loze. I think an entire km at 11%, at that altitude and after that much climbing could do enormous damage, even if there is an even steeper ramp still to come.
Of course it would do more damage than SPdBF, but compared to climbs of similar difficulty the racing/time gaps would likely be well below average.
 
It's basically Super Planche des Belles Filles on top of the first three-quarters of Val Thorens. So not far off Loze overall, but as an MTF it has the same issue as Super Planche des Belles Filles in that the brutal ramp to the line is a likely deterrent of earlier attacks.
Before the pave both sides and use Tougnete before descending to Meribel to climb Loze, this isn't too much to be excited about. Hope that would be the case, and that they choose other options until this is possible.
 
For what we know it might be harder than the Col de la Loze, though I fear they will only connect Tougnete to Meribel Mottaret in which case the first 6 km starting from Meribel would be rather flat. But even then, Tougnete via Meribel, descending down to Les Menuires before another small climb up to Val Thorens either via the usual route or the new cycling road, would be a wet dream. It's what everyone always wants with the Col de la Loze, using it as the penultimate climb before an easier final climb, but so obvious even the ASO couldn't possibly ignore it.
The wettest dream has to be Tougnete followed by Loze, descending to Courchevel and finishing somewhere like Champagny-en-Vanoise or Pralognan-la-Vanoise. Hell, even the finish this year would be good. Attack already at the last steep part of Tougnete followed by Loze. It could be a carnage we've barely seen before in Tour in modern times.
 
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Of course it would do more damage than SPdBF, but compared to climbs of similar difficulty the racing/time gaps would likely be well below average.
Would you say Col de la Loze gaps were limited because of suboptimal racing?

I know you're talking about them only attacking in the final km, but I'm not entirely sure how much climbing you needto get huge gaps after the peloton gets wrecked. Loze had huge gaps after presumably hours of 5.5W/kg pacing.
 
So we have the first few hilly stages in Italy.

A possible foray into the Alps for a soft climbing stage around Stage 4/5

A couple of days in the Pyrenees- Summit finish on Plateau de Beille.

2 days in Massif Central with uphill finish on Puy Mary.

Heard nothing about Vosges or Jura.

Probably a couple of stages in the high Alps- a lot of speculation about the 2000m+ climbs.

Then the Couillole and ITT on the last weekend.
 
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Were there actually any rumours about Ventoux or was that just people writing they think it would fit in well in a Tour visiting the Alps twice and coming from the Pyrenees the 2nd time?

Concerning Puy Mary, that's probably gonna come before the Pyrenees right?
 
So we have the first few hilly stages in Italy.

A possible foray into the Alps for a soft climbing stage around Stage 4/5

A couple of days in the Pyrenees- Summit finish on Plateau de Beille.

2 days in Massif Central with uphill finish on Puy Mary.

Heard nothing about Vosges or Jura.
If all the rumours so far is more or less accurate, I don't think there will be any room for Vosges or Jura. Right now we have rumours about 2 hilly stages, 3 medium mountain stages (if stage 4 is that) and 2 high mountain stages. You could probably add at least one more mountain stage in the Pyrenees and probably two in the Alps. I don't think there is room for much more. Mayby another medium mountain stage in the Alps (like that to Super-Dévoluy), but no Vosges or Jura.

Concerning Puy Mary, that's probably gonna come before the Pyrenees right?
Stage 9 perhaps?
 
I would say, that after this years edition, the tour did great to place GC relevant stages on viewer friendly days. Many mountain stages were on the weekend. Compare that to the years before, where the GC stages often were during the week. If they continue like they did this year I would suggest Puy Mary as a good spot for stage 9. After two easier northern alps stages 4 and 5 they can bring in 2 flat and one medium mountain day until a very hard week 1 ends on Puy Mary. Pyrenees then on stages 13 and 14 or 14 and 15. Maritime alps starting on stage 18 or 19.

But whatever those easier alps stages in week one might be. Mont Cenis and then a MTF or one or two cat 1 climbs with a decend seems propable, with Mont Cenis not coming too late to make the stage not too hard. Or maybe Sestriere - Montgenevre - Lautaret - Les Deux Alpes. Seems like a great breakaway day.
 
I found an article about the Puy Mary MTF and it said, that hotels in Aurilliac (middle large town 20 km distance or so) has not many hotel rooms left for the night 10th to 11th of July. That is from Wednesday to Thursday. Some even gave out the info, that it is for a sporting event. If this is true Puy Mary MTF likely would be on stage 11.

Link: https://www.lamontagne.fr/aurillac-...-tour-de-france-en-auvergne-en-2024_14354945/
 
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No, northernmost stages will be in the côte d´or departement (region around Dijon). So, basically the northern half of France won´t feature in the Tour. Again.
Unpopular opinion-

There's not a whole lot in Northern France for route design other than sprint stages. Nobody is crying that it's being left out.
Apart from a cobbled stage there's nothing else that creates much excitement for good racing in Northern France.
 
I also wouldn't rule out the Bretagne. I think it could be possible, that after days 4 and 5 in the alps the tour heads north west and finishes the first week on the Mur de Bretagne. In the last years the Mur had an established 3-year-rhythm, so 2024 would be the next time to bring it. THen flat south on day 10 before Puy Mary on stage 11.
 
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I wouldn't rule out Vosges.
Mmmm.... doubt it, even more so if there will be 2 stages in Cantal. In that case we would have:
Stages 1-3 in Italy
Stage 4 light Alpine stage
Stages 5-7 towards Burgundy, stage 5 may be another Alpine stage
Stages 8-9 in Burgundy
Presumably some stages going south or Southwest
Middle of the 2nd week in Cantal
Maybe 1 transitional stage
3rd weekend in the Pyrenees
1 or 2 transitional stages towards the Alps
2 Alpine stages
If we had 1 transitional stage to the Alps, we will have another before the final weekend, if not those 2 Alpine stages will be followed by the already known stages 20 and 21.
 

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