• The Cycling News forum is looking to add some volunteer moderators with Red Rick's recent retirement. If you're interested in helping keep our discussions on track, send a direct message to @SHaines here on the forum, or use the Contact Us form to message the Community Team.

    In the meanwhile, please use the Report option if you see a post that doesn't fit within the forum rules.

    Thanks!

VDB death

Page 3 - Get up to date with the latest news, scores & standings from the Cycling News Community.
Hitting Close to Home

Epicycle said:
Valentino Fois also died at the age of 34 last year.

I'm 34 this year...I think this is why VDB's death is hitting especially hard. Fois's death hit hard, but not quite as hard, but then Gerlach's relapse was a bit more personal (esp. since nearly 15 years ago we were riding around upstate NY and he was being silly [while Marty Jemison tried to be cool] but - mierda, this was a guy I drove to the mall in Middletown) and freaked me out, now VDB is dead.

I have no plans to follow these guys, but trust me, it doesn't matter how much money you have or what country you're intent on spending it in, or running off to, once you've been rumbled for doping, gotten hooked on Stilnox (different brand-name for Ambien, which is zolpidem tartrate), lost continuity on the bike and been passed through the anti-doping meat grinder (if though you probably new most of the risks when you made your choices) - for every guy like Riis or Basso who slither their way back into the top levels of pro cycling, there is also a VDB, Pantani, Fois or JM Jimenez - or maybe the ratio is different. I dunno.

What I would like to know is if anyone has compiled a list of deaths of pro cyclists (Active or Recently Suspended-Retired), date of death, cause of death, circumstances, and retired/suspended? I need this information for a project I'm working on. It's not going to save the world, but it's part of the efforts I'm making to atone for "the past."
 
Aug 26, 2009
38
0
0
Visit site
The end of another road.

stephens said:
I offer my condolences.

Regardless of power output and how he got it, VDB sure looked great on the bike. And that's not something one gets in a syringe. It's a tragedy to lose him. I was looking forward to seeing him make a comeback of some kind.

He was a stylish, classy rider. What's less obvious is that, in an environment where ego too often rules, he showed great generosity to others. But, like many who have also died too young, he couldn't cope with the pressure from people who expected too much of him. He paid a high price for fame.
Let him rest in peace. Please.
 
Mar 18, 2009
1,003
0
0
Visit site
Joe you could try http://www.cyclisme-dopage.com/ In French but their information is as comprehensive as it comes. And I couldn't agree more with your post. Thanks for the view from the inside.

We all know the sport has a very grave problem, but until the UCI stops sacrificing riders - the more fragile the better, apparently - to maintain the myth of 'cleanness' and allow the great doping armadas with their dirty DSes and dodgy doctors to sail on unhindered, not only will we never have a truly clean sport but we'll never have a moral or ethical sport either. Boonen should have gone to rehab not the Tour, Pantani and Jimenez should have had care and support not be discarded by their sport or pushed back on their bikes, and now VDB, dead in a hotel room in Senegal with blood clots in his lungs at the age of 34.

The UCI condone the doping choice as surely as if they'd told riders to go out and do it - they need to start admitting their culpability and putting in place measures to protect riders. If they won't clean up the sport then they need to stop victimising riders to give the impression that they're doing something about the problem. Unfortunately, until Verbruggen and his cronies are out of the sport for good VDB won't be the last.
 
Aug 26, 2009
38
0
0
Visit site
Sacrificial goats

bianchigirl said:
The UCI condone the doping choice as surely as if they'd told riders to go out and do it - they need to start admitting their culpability and putting in place measures to protect riders. If they won't clean up the sport then they need to stop victimising riders to give the impression that they're doing something about the problem. Unfortunately, until Verbruggen and his cronies are out of the sport for good VDB won't be the last.

The 50% haematoctric level is a good example. It's well above the percentage for a healthy athlete, so the UCI is as good as saying: "You can dope up to the 50% level." I'm heartsick of the way individual riders are swatted like wasps when the whole wasps' nest - suppliers, specialist doctors and the rest - should be smoked out.
 
Sad, sad news. RIP VDB.

I remember hearing about his exploits and finally seeing him in action during the 1999 Vuelta where he won a stage, in the mountains I believe. Quite an elegant rider to behold in action with those long limbs. Tragic.
 
Mar 10, 2009
7,268
1
0
Visit site
To anyone in Europe who has access to Canvas, tonight they'll be re-airing VDB's documentary.

See link here

If it's possible for anyone to record it and make it available on the interweb via some kind of file sharing, I think I would be interested...:D
 
Jul 2, 2009
1,079
0
0
Visit site
bianchigirl said:
Joe you could try http://www.cyclisme-dopage.com/ In French but their information is as comprehensive as it comes. And I couldn't agree more with your post. Thanks for the view from the inside.

We all know the sport has a very grave problem, but until the UCI stops sacrificing riders - the more fragile the better, apparently - to maintain the myth of 'cleanness' and allow the great doping armadas with their dirty DSes and dodgy doctors to sail on unhindered, not only will we never have a truly clean sport but we'll never have a moral or ethical sport either. Boonen should have gone to rehab not the Tour, Pantani and Jimenez should have had care and support not be discarded by their sport or pushed back on their bikes, and now VDB, dead in a hotel room in Senegal with blood clots in his lungs at the age of 34.

100% agree and seemed like common sense.

Advertising dollars was the wedge that discarded recovery favoring $

VDB was silk on the bike
SPO2_GDI1A8IBC.1+FSPO2_VANDENBROUCKE.1.jpg


blood clots happen everyday, all over the world
 
It is not surprising, but still shocking. The common age is 34, Fois, Pantani and VDB.

HIs legend will grow just like pantani. Too many people will reflect on his passing and wondered if they could have stopped him from his demise as a person. Too often people who have had demons, dont' get recognized for the good in their life until its too late to receive those accolades.
 
May 31, 2009
19
0
0
Visit site
Rip vdb

I'm still shocked. And Very sad.

Yes, you could expect this, still.

I saw Frank one month ago in a criterium in Izegem. He looked better than ever, enjoying the (still and always lasting attention from the (belgian) public). He looked healthy, full of life... and just, happy...

I thought to myself, he is still very hungry for his sport.

But somehow it is no suprise that he didn't live that long...
We lost our golden boy.

RIP VDB.
 

Dr. Maserati

BANNED
Jun 19, 2009
13,250
1
0
Visit site
Oldman said:
+1. It looks like the future could start now.

I hope so - otherwise this tragedy will just be repeated.

Reading Joe's and Bianchigirls comments earlier it reminded me of an Australian cyclist Jobie Dajka- who was embroiled in a controversy and was asked to comment on a swimmer who at 20 had been removed from the Olympic team:

"I would hope swimming can provide help for him. In my case with cycling, I just got booted."

A year after those comments Jobie was dead at 27.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Black-Balled said:
Last I heard, it was waiting for you to get your tongue out of its bum.

No news from his dog or ChrisE's tongue in bum.

Nothing from Spuds McKenzie or that Alex from Stroh's.